(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Colonial Echo, 1979"

:Office of Student' Financial Aid 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/colonialecho197981coll 



1979 

COLONIAL 

ECHO 

College of William and Mary 



Volume 81. Copyright 1979 by 
Colonial Echo, College of Wil- 
liam and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 
23185. Published by Inter-Col- 
legiate Press, Inc., Shawnee 
Mission. Kansas 66202 




2/Introduction 



LEFT: Outdoor benches provide a pleasant 
place for Joe Cullen to study. 
BELOW: Round and round the carousel ride 
Denise Trogdon and Jay McClure. 




Tunning 
jnt 




turning point was near 
for the College of William 
and Mary. Caught between the 
new and the old, the College had 
to decide which way to turn. 
The choice ahead concerned the 
educational emphasis of William 
and Mary. The school could eith- 
er follow the small college, per- 
sonal approach to education, or 
it could conform to the pressures 
of modern society with its em- 
phasis on impersonal, mass edu- 
cation. A decision had to be 
reached. At the time, its focus 
was clear. Although William and 
Mary had grown in size and had 
become a university with its 
establishment of graduate schools, 
it never lost sight of the indi- 
vidual student. Despite growth 
and modernization, William and 
Mary retained a personal, a 
"college" approach to education. 
It attempted to educate the whole 
person in all areas of life — 
home, work, and play. 

In 1979 a new decade was ap- 
proaching and with it the pos- 
sibility of change. William and 
Mary had to choose between retain- 
ing the personal, individual ap- 
proach to education and adopting 
mass, impersonal methods. Un- 
doubtedly, William and Mary was 
near a "turning point" in its 
development, one that would in- 
fluence its direction for years 
to come. 

LEFT: A deli sandwich and conversation 
occupy Jeanne Lull and Connie Foran. 



Introduction/3 




^^yk 






^- ^ 



t 



^^^ 






vi^pmj|li ^^^^^^^^^H 


"v. 








r^l 


' 1; 










iu' Sf^"^^ 


y 






m^-j^- 




^^IJHiH 


w*- 




i^'-;; 


■•.Sf' 


E 



11 over the William and 
Mary campus, the personal 
"college" atmosphere was evi- 
dent. Looking at the physical 
characteristics of the campus, 
the student saw a small, person- 
al environment with relatively 
small dorms and houses. When 
the student walked into a class- 
room, he found that only a few 
introductory courses required 
large class enrollments. And 
when the student wanted to re- 
lax, he was able to find a vari- 
ety of activities and facilities 
close at hand. 

When the student looked beneath 
the apparent physical character- 
istics of William and Mary, he 
saw even more pertinent indica- 
tions of the personal environ- 
ment offered by the College. 



The dorms were not only small; 
they included residence hall 
staffs hired to create a more 
personal relationship between 
members on the halls and members 
in the dorm. Also, in the class- 
room, many students found their 
professors approachable and help- 
ful. And, in the college com- 
munity at large, extracurricular 
activities were more than a 
chance for technical success; 
they were an opportunity to par- 
ticipate with others as well. 

Thus, the name, the College of 
William and Mary, was quite ap- 
propriate. It described the en- 
vironment it wished to create. 
Although a university, William 
and Mary had maintained a small, 
personal "college" aspect for 
its students. 



6/Introduction 





FAR LEFT: Students indulge in a 
colossal banana split as part of Indian 
Summer Weekend activities. 
ABOVE: The Sunken Gardens is the 
perfect place for a Sunday afternoon game 
of football. 

LEFT: Cape Cod provides Dr. Gerald 
Johnson and his geology students a 
beautiful field of study. 



Introduction/7 






-*j?- 



.:._ ^M 



mmm wmwsm 






/ii'Nf^- 



1 


1 i^ m 


^^^^^^H ^'l^^^H ^^J^ "^ IS 


liMpiP ...:,. 



8/Introduction 




The small size, personal at- 
mosphere, and quiet life- 
style appeared to be timeless 
qualities of both the College of 
William and Mary and the coloni- 
al town that stood next to it. 
Each seemed a reflection of the 
other. Standing in the Col- 
lege's historic buildings or 
on Williamsburg's Duke of Glou- 
cester Street, the William and 
Mary student could well believe 
that the College and Williams- 
burg would always remain the 
same. But this was impossible. 

UPPER LEFT: Time takes a step back- 
ward in Williamsburg's colonial gardens. 
LEFT: Night descends on the Wren 
Courtyard. 



Obviously change had left nei- 
ther the school nor the town com- 
pletely untouched. In Williams- 
burg, it was evident in the ho- 
tels, fast food restaurants, and 
camera carrying tourists that 
had invaded the one-time coloni- 
al capital of Virginia. At Wil- 
liam and Mary change was also 
obvious in its new attitudes, 
goals, and opinions. 

Without a doubt, a transforma- 
tion had taken place in both the 
town and the school. The ques- 
tion was, how important was this 
transformation? Did it reflect 
a deeper, more fundamental change 
in the school and the town? In 
Williamsburg it did. Although 
the town retained its colonial 



character, it was no longer a 
seat of government. Instead it 
was a tourist attraction. At 
William and Mary, the signifi- 
cance of this change was harder 
to measure. It was more dif- 
ficult to assess its importance 
as an indicator of the school's 
shifting goals and emphases. 

To answer such questions, the 
student had to evaluate William 
and Mary's approach to education 
and decide whether it still ful- 
filled the needs of the indivi- 
dual student in all areas of 
life — home, work, and play. Such 
a decision could show what direc- 
tion William and Mary's "turning 
point" had taken or would take 
in the near future. 



Introduction/9 



COLONIAL ECHO 



INTRODUCTION 

HOME 
Lifestyles 
Religion 

WORK 
Administration 
Academics 
Graduates 
Honoraries 

PLAY 
Organizations 
Government 
Media 

Performing Arts 
Greeks 
Sports 

PEOPLE 
Classes 
Index 
Closing 



lO/Contents 





Contents/11 




12/Home 




Ml 
nl 



Iithin the William and Mary 
community, the word "home" 
brought several images to mind. 
To some students, home was a sin- 
gle dorm room that served as liv- 
ing room, bedroom, study, and 
kitchen. To others, it was a 
small house or building shared 
with others of common interest, 
commitment, or friendship. To 
still others, it was an apartment 
that actually possessed some of 
the comforts of home. But what- 
ever the situaiian, home at Wil- 
liam and Mary was an opportunity 
for the individual student to 
create a personal lifestyle. 

As part of this home environ- 
ment the College supplied a wide 
variety of services. For exam- 
ple, a school cafeteria was a- 
vailable for those who had no 
inclination to cook or pay the 
high prices of restaurants. And 
for those who felt adventurous 
enough to cook or eat out, a bus 
service ran to the nearest shop- 
ping center, where stores and 
restaurants were located. 

For the student then, William 
and Mary was a small self-con- 
tained community offering many 
different living arrangements, 
lifestyles, and services. Un- 
fortunately though, times were 
changing. Housing was becoming 
scarce and the cost of special 
services was climbing. The 
question was, would William and 
Mary be able to resist this 
change? 



Home/13 




14/Lifestyles 






,a:;^ 



n looking back over the 
1 academic year 1978-79, 
life at William and Mary surely 
didn't seem greatly changed from 
the previous year. Or the year 
before that. Or the year before 
that. Well, maybe a few distinc- 
tions were to be found in the 
sudden craze of toga parties on 
weekends, the transformation of 
Chandler and Taliferro, the ex- 
citement of Liz Taylor Warner's 
appearance on campus, and the 
community-wide mobilization of 
energies and talents to promote 
the Campaign for the College. 
But beyond these changes and 
occasional distractions, student 



life was characterized by on- 
going struggles with classes, 
diets and roommates; endless 
lines at the caf, the post office, 
and the Bookstore; and the ever- 
present tourists to guide, di- 
rect, and enlighten. 

While all students were plagued 
with such problems and annoy- 
ances, each one still discovered 
that William and Mary offered 
him a unique, new opportunity to 
live his life in the style he 
chose, be it permanent residence 
on Swem Third Floor, faithful 
attendance at the Pub each Wed- 
nesday night, or a balanced mix- 
ture of the two. 



Lifestyles/15 



NAnON 

It was a great year for 
events. The dollar sank 
to new lows on the world's mon- 
ey markets; civil war raged in 
Lebanon and Nicaragua; a tenta- 
tive step was taken towards 
peace in the Middle East; the 
Pope died and yet died again; 
and a tax explosion in Califor- 
nia left debris scattered over 
the entire country. And like a 
plunked stone, the ever-widening 
ripples of these happenings hur- 
ried towards us, shaking founda- 
tions and scuttling living space. 
But they landed with only a gen- 
tle slap, imperceptible to most, 
faintly acknowledged by the few 
who stumbled across newspapers. 

History did take place behind 
our backs. The distractions of 
the moment, if they could be 
called distractions, kept outside 
events outside. The immediate 
loves, hungers, and necessities 
of our lives infected us with a 
near-sightedness that relegated 
the "world event" to a blurred 
play acting. And within a few 
years even the newsworthy will 
have become a dusty, vague mem- 
ory — something that had to be 
superseded. Not until we are 
dead will they have been sifted 
from life and called singular, 
catalogued and measured, their 
effects chased down causal high- 
ways, and their significance "ex- 
plained." Yesterday our minds 
were focused on today; today, to- 
morrow beckons. We lived our 
lives like lives must be lived — 
extended in the future, with a 
glance at the headlines or a 
moment's attention paid to the 
evening news, when time and our 
personal occupations permitted. 

RIGHT: Viewed across an open, grassy 
expanse, the Washington Monument stands 
tall in the distance. 




16AJSA 




USA/17 




ISA^irginia 




STATE 



Vital state issues did not 
dominate the headlines in 
Virginia newspapers during the 
1978-79 school year. Some of the 
"hottest" issues included pari- 
mutuel betting and pay raises for 
state-employed college professors. 
Probably the most publicized po- 
litical event for Virginia was 
the Senate race between Democrat 
Andrew Miller and Republican 
John Warner. 

Campaigning was extensive for 
both men, although their "Virgin- 
ia Experience" and "Virginia 
Philosophy" differed very little. 
Both men espoused a conservative 
ethos, criticizing the other for 
being free-spending. The result- 
ing campaign was often like an 
air stagnation watch on a dog 
day afternoon. 

Neither candidate spoke on the 
William and Mary campus, but both 
sent representatives. Congres- 
sional candidate Lew Puller spoke 
before the Young Democrats on be- 
half of Miller, and Elizabeth 
Taylor Warner addressed a crowd 
at the GOP-sponsored seafood 
fest at Lake Matoaka in September. 

While Warner was the winner in 
22 out of 23 mock campus elec- 
tions across Virginia, including 
a narrow victory at William and 
Mary, the voters had difficulty 
perceiving ideological differ- 
ences between the two men. The 
election was so close that at 
one point, with 96% of the pre- 
cincts reporting, CBS News showed 
Warner leading by only one vote. 
The final outcome was one of the 
closest in Virginia history: War- 
ner won by a mere 5,000 votes. 
While the campaign brought lit- 
tle excitement to Virginia and 
to the William and Mary campus 
in particular, the voters' 
choice surely brought national 
attention to the state. 



Virginia/19 



RIGHT: As graduation nears, senior Susan 
Arnot discusses job prospects with Corpor- 
ate Relations aide Bruce Lindsay. 
BELOW: Smiles are shared between Everett 
Boyd and a friend at a dorm get-together. 





ARE YOU SET? 



College life at William 
and Mary. Does this 
phrase evoke visions of four 
years' shelter in a safe, 
academic refuge far, far away 
from the harsh realities of 
life? Yet is life here really 
such a dreamlike existence? 
Ask most recent W & M grad- 
uates this question and you'll 
receive a loud, vehement 
"Never!" accompanied by a 
woeful tale of the nightmarish 
academic rigors to which he 
had been subjected for the 
past few years. If pressed, 
he will usually also admit 
that these studies have 
been worthwhile; that the 
liberal education he received 
at William and Mary really did 
give him an ability to handle 
the challenges which the working 
life would present him, an aware- 
ness of state and national 
issues, and the confidence to 
deal with them as they affected 
his own existence. 

More often than not, the 
typical student gained this 
confidence outside the class- 



room and beyond the books. 
Just living from day to day 
became a lesson in self- 
sufficiency for the guy who 
was now faced with washing 
his own jeans and balancing 
a checkbook. Those who lived 
off-campus painfully realized 
that nightly meals at Sal's 
and hour-long hot showers 
wreak havoc on a student's 
meager budget. 

From sharing a Hawaiian 
friend's delight in seeing 
her first snowfall, to 
mastering the art of "mixing" 
at fraternity smokers, 
to stifling the impulse to 
choke a thoughtless roommate, 
most developed the maturity to 
deal diplomatically with others, 
enjoyed meeting people, and 
valued the friendships which 
ensued. 

Certainly college life at 
W & M was in ways removed from 
the world beyond. Yet it 
still offered many a valuable 
period of transition and 
preparation for a new life of 
independence. 




ABOVE: Apartment living provides Ed 
Smith with a far more tranquil study 
atmosphere than a dorm ever could. 



20AV&M— A Preparation for USA, VA 




NEW ENVIRONS 



Infinite measures of walk- 
ing and waiting, questions 
and answers, not to mention the 
myriad of names to remember — 
such are the challenges which 
traditionally awaited each year's 
incoming freshmen and transfer 
students. Frequently unsure 
of how they accomplished such 
a feat, most students made the 
adjustment to life at William and 
Mary with capability and con- 
fidence. - 

Orientation Aides, assigned 
to groups of 10 to 12 new stu- 
dents, were expected to act as 
tour guides, social directors, 
and general information centers 
for their charges. Some OA's 
accomplished this in extra- 
ordinary ways, accompanying 
their group on hour-long bus 
rides until all had learned 
the route, or introducing 
them to "Thumper" and the 
unique atmosphere of the 
Cave. And somehow everyone 
seemed to have the great idea 
of introducing the freshmen 
to the pleasures of a deli 



sandwich, resulting in 
traffic jams that flabber- 
gasted the regulars and 
probably delighted the 
owners. Kegs, volleyball 
games and other activities 
were organized so that the 
new freshmen could get to 
know each other and grow 
at ease in the new environ- 
ment which was to become 
"home" for the next eight months. 

Orientation programs included 
various placement tests, present- 
ations, and meetings with ad- 
ministration and faculty, cul- 
minating in the much-dreaded 
arena-style registration pro- 
cess. Students weathered the 
event well, despite the horror 
stories mischievous upperclass- 
men had told them of this har- 
rowing experience. By the close 
of the orientation period, not 
all questions were answered and 
not all the new faces had names, 
but college life was not nearly 
so foreign as it had seemed just 
a week earlier. 



TOP: Mothers would shriek u iriLj, kiif, 
that most student rooms closely resemble 
that of freshmen Barry Long and Luis Navas. 
ABOVE: Freshmen endure the first of 
myriad lines in renting a post office box. 



Orientation/21 



RIGHT: The German House Oktoberfest wel- 
comes autumn with an exuberant mixture 
of song, dance and beer. 
BELOW: Life in a small house means that 
Italian House inhabitants form fast 
and friendly relationships. 





VIVE LA DIFFERENCE! 



Among the variety of life- 
styles William and Mary 
offered students was a wide ar- 
ray of special interest housing. 
Such residences gave students a 
unique opportunity to pursue an 
interest in a foreign language 
and culture in an informal man- 
ner which was found to be more 
informative than sitting in a 
stuffy room in Washington Hall 
fighting sleep by watching the 
cockroaches. 

The German, French, and Span- 
ish Houses occupied adjoining 
units in Botetourt Complex and 
offered similar programs of 
weekly conversation hours, for- 
eign meals, lectures, and films. 
German House residents found 
their Marchenstunde, or fairy 
tale hour, to be especially en- 
tertaining. Stammtisch (going 
to the Cave and speaking German) 
provided many a resident with a 
welcome break from studies. The 
advent of holidays and the change 
in seasons were party occasions. 
Special foods and traditions 



made Yuletide one of the bright- 
est times of the year and spring 
was greeted with the annual 
Botetourt May Day celebration. 

Perhaps the most active of 
the interest houses was the Asia 
House. Faced in the past with 
lukewarm support by the college 
community, the house organized 
more activities than ever this 
year and strove to increase in- 
terest and attendance of pro- 
grams. Swami Agehananda Bha- 
rati, a master of 16 languages 
and a Hindu monk, entranced his 
audience with tales of his years 
in an Lidian monastery and his 
views on Hindu mysticism. The 
final interest house located on 
New Campus was Project Plus. 
Plus housed over 80 individuals, 
all interested in pursuing some 
aspect of this year's theme of 
Creativity. 

The Italian and Russian 
Studies Houses located on 
Jamestown Road were the new- 
est additions to the College's 
range of special interest hous- 



ing. An asti spumanti recep- 
tion in honor of Columbus Day 
added sparkle to the Casa 
Italiana's fall program of 
events. The Russian House 
brought to campus both the 
Yale Russian Chorus and an 
entertaining lecturer from 
ODU who spoke concerning 
Soviet satire, proving that 
the Russians really do have 
a sense of humor. 

Many students mistakenly be- 
lieved that life in a special 
interest house meant living 
with bookish individuals and 
yawning through foreign films. 
Yet these houses offered some 
of the most stimulating pro- 
grams on campus and gave their 
members more advantages than 
most realized. When asked 
why he decided to 
live in the Russian House, one 
guy answered with a twinkle in 
his eye, "Well, it's because I 
like the people. You see, 
there's my roommate and me . . 
and eight girls." 



22/Special Interest Housing 




LEFT: A living room boasting bright Rus- 
sian posters is the setting for easy con- 
versation between Russian House President 
Lalla Shishkevish and Professors Hallett 
and Smith. 

CENTER LEFT: Each Tuesday evening Spanish 
House members concoct and savor a differ- 
ent item of Latin cuisine. 

CENTER RIGHT: Mummy meets grapes at an 
Asia House Halloween party. 
BOTTOM LEFT: Wednesday night forums at 
Project Plus are traditionally followed 
by an informal coffee hour. 
BOTTOM RIGHT: Bygone fads, fashions and 
freaks can be found at the French 
House's 60's party. 




Special Interest Housing/23 



RIGHT: To dance without losing one's 
"attire" is a challenge for Linda Lynch 
and Nancy Conlon at a Hunt-JBT toga party. 
BELOW: A new album offers Bruce Jones 
a brief but welcome respite from studies. 





MAKING IT LIKE HOME 



Perhaps one of the major 
skills acquired at William 
and Mary during four hectic 
years was the fine art of liv- 
ing with a hodge-podge of 
people in unique situations 
and learning to like it, no 
matter what the circumstances. 

At first glance, William 
and Mary's on-campus housing 
seemed to consist of the 
sardine structures found on 
campuses across the nation. 
In reality, the W & M stu- 
dent had considerable freedom 
in choosing his own lifestyle, 
for housing options included 
special interest housing, coed 
dorms, single rooms, doubles, 
apartment living and Greek 
housing. With the renovation 
of Chandler and Taliaferro 
complete, students had access 
to all dorms on campus for the 
first time in years. Upper- 
classmen flocked to the 
spanking-new Chandler and the 
perennially popular lodges. The 
concept of "mixed dorms" 
combining freshmen and upper- 



classmen together in one 
structure was successfully 
effected in Barrett and 
Jefferson. Bryan Complex 
remained coed, and the Terrace 
received its first female in- 
habitants, though limited to 
only those enrolled in the 
graduate schools. While a few 
students were forced to apart- 
ment-hunt, most who desired on- 
campus housing were satisfact- 
orily placed in a much more 
smoothly-engineered room se- 
lection process than seen in 
past years. 

Students rose to the chal- 
lenge of stamping individual- 
ity on their four walls with 
flourish and enthusiasm. 
Posters, plants and stereo 
speakers went up in a flash 
to hide peeling paint and 
ancient plaster in the not- 
so-new dorms. In Landrum, 
a set of four suitemates 
agreed to place their four 
beds in one room of the 
suite, leaving the other 
for a living/dining area. 



Immaculate or chaotic, the 
dorm room became home for 
William and Mary students. 

To add to the feeling of 
"home" and involvement in 
community living, the staff 
of Residence Hall Life cre- 
ated programs tailored to 
suit every need. In ad- 
dition to dorm parties, 
there were area-wide pro- 
jects like JBT's Oct- 
Terrace-Fest, Jamestown 
Road's One-More-for-the- 
Road and the Bryan Complex 
Heart Dance. Speakers on 
security, career planning, 
and income tax forms made 
study breaks more than just 
munch-outs. They became infor- 
mative as well. 

Whether listening to live 
music on Barrett's porch or 
sharing popcorn with the gang 
across the hall, dorm living 
provided an exciting means for 
discovering new people, new 
ideas, and a broader sense of 
self for those in the William 
and Mary community. 



24/Dorm Life 



BELOW: The mood and the music are 
mellow at Old Dominion. 
BOTTOM: Not content with just drinking 
the "trashcan" punch, Diane Herkness want- 
ed to dunk for fruit as well. 




Mix-ups 



Coed freshman housing: a 
definite and exciting 
first at W & M! Over the summer 
the decision was finalized to 
make Taliaferro coed. Forty- 
four men and nine women were 
randomly chosen to inhabit 
the newly-renovated dorm. 
Both the freshmen and their 
parents were called, and 
permission was obtained to 
place the students in the 
unique housing situation 
during their freshman year. 

The response was decidedly 
enthusiastic. Area Coordinator 
Debbie Davis expressed satis- 
faction with the Year's ex- 
periment and felt that the 
dorm's smallness had led 
to strong group rapport and 
cooperation. Residents en- 
thusiastically participated 
in trivia quizzes on Sunday 
nights and generally enjoyed 
the dorm's superb new facil- 
ities, which included game 
tables, an air-conditioned 
lobby, a fireplace, and a newly 
decorated atmosphere. 



Dorm Life/25 



Eating-Atime for food, 



Food. It was a doughnut 
wolfed down between get- 
ting up at 7:45 and making it to 
an 8 o'clock class. Or, it was 
an excuse for going to the caf 
three times a day, more to so- 
cialize than to gluttonize. Of- 
tentimes it was the means, meth- 
od and manner of celebrating 
birthdays, taking a break from 
the books, or just having a good 
time with friends. 

"Foodwise," the noteworthy 
event this year was that more 
people than ever chose to ingest 
the bulk of their daily caloric 
intake at the caf. In its sec- 
ond year of catering service to 
the College, Shamrock had worked 
out the kinks of feeding the W&M 
student body and featured sev- 
eral new meal plan options, break- 
fast and dinner at the Wigwam, 
soft ice cream and special holi- 
day buffets. As a result, the 
food service attracted more board- 
ers than it could handle; over 
one hundred non-freshmen were 
placed on a waiting list until 
Shamrock could accommodate them. 

The majority of upperclassmen 
still cooked for themselves. 
Anyone walking through the halls 
of Monroe or Chandler at 6 p.m. 
could have verified this, as his 
nostrils were teased with a tan- 
talizing array of culinary aromas. 
Cooking provided one with numer- 
ous facts and lessons, such as 
learning a hundred and one ways 
to combine ground beef and toma- 
to sauce, and discovering the 
bargain to be found in buying 
A&P's day-old bread. 

Eating out was popular with 
everyone. McDonald's found a 
formidable rival in the newly 
opened Wendy's, as many students 
opted for a Thick 'n Juicy or a 
Big Mac rather than take their 
chances with the cafeteria's 
Mystery Mound with gravy. There 

TOP: While the food isn't always tops, 
the cafeteria remains a popular place for 
eating, socializing, relaxing. 
RIGHT: Friday afternoons finds the super- 
markets full of students like Kathy Sull- 
ivan doing their shopping for the week. 



was always a line of hungry peo- 
ple waiting when George's opened 
for dinner every evening at five. 
With daily student specials and 
a friendly setting, the small 
restaurant provided plenty of 
good food which was within both walk- 
ing distance and a college student's 
price range. Sal's and Pizza 
Hut vied for the distinction of 
serving the best pizza in town, 
while local delis waged a series 
of price wars, much to the con- 
cern of their patrons. A 15- 
cent hike in the price of a 



deli sandwich became a major 
topic of discussion on campus. 
Special occasions called for 
something more. At these times, 
Sunday brunch at the Cascades 
was a delectable way to celebrate 
a birthday or welcome in the hol- 
iday season. The colonial res- 
taurants were favored places 
when parents came to town and 
for taking a girl out for a spec- 
ial evening lit by the soft glow 
of candles and the last rays of 
the sun striping the polished 
wood floors. 




26/Food 



friendshiD and fun 



LEFT: The task of choosing between a Hot 
Holly and a Hot Chandler is a difficult 
one for Dean Wilson. 
BELOW: The jokes and banter of rowdy 
dinner companions brings forth a broad 
grin from Cathy Sardo. 

BOTTOM: The "millions served" at McDon- 
ald's includes many W&M students tired 
of scrounging for dinner themselves. 




Food/27 



r 



nr^^^ 



! 

t 



hSiWiJLimMfSiKanmiism 



get there from here is to place body, 
books and boxes on a bike and take off. 
BELOW RIGHT: The post office bulletin 
board shows a melange of rides 
offered/needed. 



BELOW: When five husky guys t 
into a 2-door Toyota, someone hi 
in the back, as Dean Wilson and 
Barbour soon discover. 



lis 


IS 






■ 1 


B 


Ul 








w^^Mm": 




li 


^ 







>.\tt Fot Ji TO 
«ll>«5 OCT. 27 .h 




LEXlNGToW .- |THftNI«6IViN& 




XAfeekend escape 



I here were times when 
every W&M student felt 
that, if he spent one more 
weekend amidst books, room- 
mates and tourists, he would 
go bananas. For most Vir- 
ginians, a weekend at home was 
the answer, as family, good 
"food and attention were only 
^veral hours away. The pro- 
mise of seeing one's boyfriend, 
attending an away ballgame or 
taking in a concert gave many 
a reason to visit other state 
schools. 

Finding transportation was 
generally no problem; chances 
were good for grabbing a ride 
with someone heading in the 



same direction as you, and buses 
were conveniently scheduled 
for weekend trips. While most 
out-of-staters had to be 
content with an occasional 
day at Virginia or a week- 
end home with an in-state 
roommate, some took advan- 
tage of the daily train 
northward to visit parents 
and friends. Others found that 
splitting the cost of a rental 
car four ways was even less 
expensive and enabled one to 
leave earlier and stay longer, 
thus getting the most out of a 
student's "down-trodden" 



28/Transportation 




IfCLB giis^ Kevin Braddish a freer, 
[lethod of getting around the 'burg than a 
could. 



WI^IM 





H i ft 

IPCEuiiiMfe 


i^^ 






^^^ 





^''^■^ *»i^^Sr^ 



GREEN-AND-GOLDS run two routes 
around campus to accommodate students liv- 
ing on one end with classes on the other. 



KEEP 
MOVIN' 



ow to get there from here 
» » posed a challenging prob- 
lem to William and Mary stu- 
dents. Although not a large 
school, the college campus often 
proved to be expansive, espe- 
cially when students were forced 
to slough from one class in the 
Wren building to another in 
Morton on a rainy day. Since 
only juniors, seniors, and JBT 
residents were allowed resident 
parking stickers for their 
cars, underclassmen had to 
find other means of trans- 
portation. The Green Machines, 
with the Gold and Green runs 
from Ludwell and JBT, gave 
students easier access to the 
shopping centers and a quick 
means to get to the Caf. 
Other students preferred to 
use bicycles, alleviating 
book-toting problems with the 
every-present backpacks. Short 
jogs from building to building 
appealed to the more athletic 
William and Mary student, 
while many preferred a sedate 
walk, allowing time to stop 
and talk with friends along 
the way. 

Parking spaces were often 
hard to find for those blessed 
with cars, and frustrated stu- 
dents could be seen circling 
the parking lots minutes be- 
fore class, hoping to find 
another car leaving. Illegal 
parking was discouraged, as 
the Campus Police persisted in 
diligently writing out a 
plethora of parking tickets. 
The resurfacing of the Common 
Glory parking lot compounded 
the problem, as that area was 
closed to parking for 
several months. Many upper- 
classmen eventually gave up and 
relied on walking, buses, and 
bicycles to get to class, using 
their cars for weekend trips 
or study breaks at Mr. Donut. 



Transportation/2f: 



New York City it's not! 



For the devoted shopper, 
WilHamsburg was a town of 
both unique opportunities and 
annoying deficiencies. On the 
positive side, it was probably 
one of the few places where, in 
the space of two or three blocks, 
one could purchase a handprinted 
scrapbook in the colonial style, 
a delicately fashioned Russian 
box, or a tricorn hat. Secret 
Santa gifts. Little Sister clues, 
and Christmas presents were all 
easy and fun to shop for in the 
'burg. In short, Williamsburg 
was a town dedicated to the fine 
art of browsing. 

The problems arose when one 
tried to buy anything practical 
or necessary for daily life and 
its activities. For those hail- 
ing from the more cosmopolitan 
areas of the state and the East 
Coast, it was a big and not-too- 
pleasant surprise to discover 
that the nearest shopping mall 
was over a half an hour distant. 
Merchants' Square was oriented 
towards tourism, gift items and 



convenience shopping, and the 
local shopping center, consisting 
of an oversized ten-cent store, 
an undersized department store, 
a pizza parlor, and a second-run 
movie theater, was hardly more 
attractive. Richmond-area and 
other students who lived in ad- 
jacent towns solved this problem 
by going home on a weekend to 
buy a pledge dance formal or get 
a haircut. The rest of us held 
out until the Christmas holiday 
or Spring Break. Actually, this 
strategy had its advantages. 
First, one was assured of a 
better selection at various 
price ranges. One could also hope 
that the folks, in their pleasure 
at having a son or daughter at 
home once again, would spring for 
a new speaker or that pair of 
leather boots you liked. 

RIGHT: A trip to the post office is 
profitable for Kent Gritton and Sammy. 
BELOW: The Campus Center front desk is 
a convenient place to cash checks and 
buy munchies. 





30/School Services 




Shopping/31 



It's more than ticketins 



Officer Stan Clark has been 
a member of the Campus Po- 
lice force since June of 1977. 
Since that time he has become 
a well-known and well-liked 
figure on campus whose main 
desire is to "protect life and 
limb" in a relaxed and educated 
atmosphere. 

Clark noted that the Campus Po- 
lice force is in a unique posi- 
tion because it has all of the 
police powers of a city agency 
placed in a college setting. 
This calls for "... an increased 
awareness and a greater degree 
of discretion from administrators 
and officers alike." According 
to Clark, the individual officer 
must become a part of the acade- 
mic community and develop a spe- 
cial awareness for handling pro- 
blems. Because minor infractions 
can be handled internally with 
college administration rather than 
a judicial court system, the Cam- 
pus Police officer has more al- 
ternatives than his municipal 
counterpart. 

Clark sees service as a major 
aspect of his job. In dealing 
with college students, major of- 
fenses are not very prevalent; 
thus, he is more likely to be 
involved in calls for locating 
missing persons, assisting mo- 
torists, or transporting ill stu- 
dents. Still his major concern 
rests in "protecting life and 
limb," and he feels a definite 
responsibility to make the cam- 
pus as safe and trouble-free as 
possible. 

UPPER RIGHT: In keeping with his unique 
position, Officer Clark provides services 
as well as law-enforcement for the College. 
LOWER RIGHT: A police motorcycle is an 
effective means for Officer Balun to patrol 
the campus and preserve campus security. 
OPPOSITE PAGE: 
RIGHT: Wheel-locking offers campus 
police an effective last resort in dealing 
with those who have left too many parking 
tickets unpaid. 

FAR RIGHT: The maintenance of campus 
security is a full-time job for Sergeant 
Bennett requiring long hours and much 
preparation. 




32/Campus Police 




A NEW VERSATILITY 



Despite the general im- 
pression that the poHce 
force spent an inordinate a- 
mount of time issuing parking 
tickets, the role of the campus 
police was actually a good 
deal more versatile and ser- 
vice oriented. 

In 1975 Director Harvey Gun- 
son implemented a major shift 
in emphasis. The campus secur- 
ity force became a police 
force, with the full rights 
and privileges of a municipal 
police force coupled with its 
responsibility to the academic 
community. 

Since the institution of such 
a police force, there has been a 
marked decrease in crimes against 
the individual on campus; no 
sexual assaults have been re- 
ported on campus within the 
past two years. 

Motor cycle patrolmen with the 
greater mobility and visibility 



they possess in comparison to 
those on foot or in cars, result- 
ed in speedy responses to 
calls from students and staff 
members. A student security 
force supplementing the regular 
force increased the number of 
eyes and ears available. These 
students were assigned to areas 
of concern and were equipped 
with radios to maintain contact 
with the dispatcher. They too 
served to discourage potential 
vandals and offenders. 

Director Gunson said of his 
force, "They are capable, qual- 
ified and efficient." He noted 
that in an academic community 
it is necessary to be responsive 
to the needs of the students 
while maintaining a good rap- 
port with them. "It takes a 
better police officer to wear 
two hats, that of a community 
member and that of a law en- 
forcement officer," Gunson asserted. 



Campus police were a versa- 
tile group responding to a 
variety of needs. They assist- 
ed municipal police in criminal 
matters and responded to pleas 
from students to unlock necessary 
classrooms. In addition they 
offered programs concerning 
assault prevention and alcohol 
and drug abuse. 

Future goals for the campus 
police force included increas- 
ing the level of quality pro- 
fessional service, still with 
an eye to determining how much 
"police" an academic community 
can absorb. While the police 
officers tried to maintain a fa- 
vorable rapport with students 
in a small community with spec- 
ialized needs, their major goal 
remained to provide effective 
police service to the students 
and faculty of the College of 
William and Mary. 



Campus Police/33 



TAKE TIME FOR LIVING 



Despite the numerous, often 
vehement allegations to the 
contrary, it can be easily shown 
that there are a heck of a lot of 
ways to ease up, settle down and 
goof off in this college commun- 
ity. You say you have a free Sat- 
urday afternoon on your hands? 
Take a stroll down Dog Street and 
wander into those shops and col- 
onial homes you've been meaning 
to explore since freshman year. 
Buy hot gingerbread cookies at the 
Raleigh Tavern Bakery. Help out 
a tourist. Browse through the 
used book store on Boundary Street. 
Or pack a sandwich, grab a girl 
and a bicycle, and head for the 
Yorktown beach for lunch. Choose a 
good book (no required reading al- 
lowed) and paddle a canoe out to 
the middle of Lake Matoaka. 

You say it's raining? Then go 
cheer on the Indians at the gym- 
nastics meet. While you're at the 
Hall you can get in a few fast 
games of handball. Or make some 
popcorn and catch an old movie on 
TV. For all you compulsive stud- 
iers who feel guilty unless doing 
something constructive, sew up 
those holes in your socks, write 
a letter home or balance your 
checkbook. If you turn up the 



stereo, even these mundane activi- 
ties might seem almost enjoyable. 

So you can find something to 
do during the day, you say, but 
what about at night? It's tough 
to have a good time in a 17th- 
century town. Not necessarily so. 
Hardly a weekend goes by when 
there isn't a play or concert to 
attend. If you're short on money, 
go to an organ recital at Bruton 
Parish or take in a movie at the 
German House's Foreign Film Fes- 
tival. If partying is more your 
style, there's always the Pub. 
Sure it gets hot and crowded, but 
do you know any better way to 
get into a conversation with that 
cute guy in your volleyball class? 
When all the other places close up 
for the night, remember that the 
Dirty Deli stays open until two. 
If you don't feel like going any- 
where, throw your own party; get 
to know the girls down the hall 
and call up those people you 
never get around to visiting. 

Over 4000 students attend W&M. 
Do you know them all yet? 



RIGHT; Reading on roller skates engrosses 
M.B. Leaf. 

BELOW: Studies are put out of mind while 
Mike Cline and John Paine play backgammon. 





34/Relaxing 



LEFT: A pinball victory evokes a smile 
from Dennis Parker. 

BELOW: Preparations for a night "on the 
town" busy Rich Pierce and Bob Marchbank. 
BOTTOM; Cleared of books, a desk makes the 
perfect sewing area for Nora McGinnis. 




It is not just a game 



Thomas Jefferson would be 
very pleased to see that 
the most indulged-in pastime at 
his old alma mater this year was 
backgammon. It was a very egali- 
tarian sport — anyone could play 
it anywhere, at anytime. With 
only a few elementary rules, it 
was not a difficult game to learn, 
yet the strategies open to the 
more seasoned player made it al- 
ways challenging. This and its 
other qualities made backgammon 



popular to the point of addiction 
with a good percentage of William 
and Mary students. Playing boards 
came small enough that individuals 
were seen openly engaging in a 
game while in line at movie thea- 
ters and furtively playing during 
sorority meetings and Geology lec- 
tures. Dorms held massive back- 
gammon tournaments in the spring, 
and many a student put off an Eng- 
lish paper or a Chem take-home in 
order to win the best out of three. 



three out of five, five out of 
seven, and so on. 

In our parents' time the game 
was bridge. But how many people 
nowadays really know the differ- 
ence between a trump and a trick? 
While fads, fashions and fun times 
changed over the years, the pur- 
pose behind them all remained es- 
sentially the same. Backgammon 
was this year's way of taking a 
break from the studies and relax- 
ing with friends. 



Relaxing/35 



STAYING CLOSE 



In grade school they called 
it "Back-to-School Night," 
and your parents religiously at- 
tended every year. They would 
go to your classroom, squeeze 
long limbs under knee-high desks, 
and attentively listen to the 
teacher praise your spelling prow- 
ess and express misgivings about 
your penmanship. The desks are 
slightly larger these days and 
parents can now chat with faculty 
over a glass of wine, but the 
purpose of Parents' Weekend is 
much the same as it was for grade 
school functions those many years 
ago — to allow parents to become 
familiar with the campus and com- 
munity that have or will become 
their son's or daughter's home 
for several years. 

Held this year on October 6 
and 7, Parents' Weekend presented 
"An Inside Look . . . Our Leaders." 
The program was a joint venture 
between the Parents' Association 
and the College, and activities 
were scheduled by Parents' Assoc- 
iation President Dan Restuccia, 
Student Chairman Jerry Brown and 
Coordinator Nancy Thompson. A 
lecture series featuring remarks 
by four professors, all highly 
regarded leaders in their academ- 
ic fields, was an innovative ad- 
dition to the customary elements 
of the program. Talks were given 



by President Thomas Graves and 
Restuccia, and were accompanied 
by an open discussion in which 
parents and administration could 
pursue matters of campus life and/ 
or academic affairs which inter- 
ested them. 

Other weekend events included 
the traditional reception for 
parents in the Wren Yard hosted 
by President and Mrs. Graves. A 
talent show on Friday evening was 
generally considered the weekend's 
most popular event. Enthusias- 
tically received by all who at- 
tended, it featured individual 
displays of talent as well as a 
program of song by the William 
and Mary Choir. Saturday offered 
families a variety of activities 
to engage in and events to attend. 
Many took advantage of the buffet 
luncheon on Andrews Lawn, the 
home football game followed by 
open houses at residence halls, 
and a big band dance at the Cam- 
pus Center that evening. Fair 
weather persuaded others to pass 
the day shopping, touring CW/ and 
dining in one of the colonial 
taverns. 

The weekend drew over 1200 
parents to the campus and pro- 
vided, as always, a satisfying 
occasion for students to share 
with parents their collegiate 
experiences and activities. 





36/Parents' Weekend 




LEFT: A reception held in the colonial 
Wren Yard enables parents and President 
Graves to exchange views. 
BELOW: A letter home keeps Kate Mor- 
gans and her folks in touch. 
BOTTOM: Songs by Sheila Reed and Steve 
Hopkins are well received by all who 
attended the student talent show. 




It keeps the folks happy 



Once the semester got going 
and you were besieged with 
papers, exams, smokers, and par- 
ties, the first things you shoved 
aside for later were cleaning the 
room, doing laundry, and writing 
home. The first two chores could 
be ignored for only so long; even- 
tually the mass of clothes in the 
comer collected every sock in 
your possession and had to be 
shifted from floor to washing ma- 
chine. But that letter home could 
be postponed indefinitely. When 
five weeks passed and your parents 
stopped sending money for fear you 



had expired, it was a simple mat- 
ter to pick up the phone, dial 
home, and apologize in your most 
placating and obedient tones. 
One could proceed for an entire 
semester in this manner, never 
once putting pen to paper for fa- 
milial reasons. 

Or one could make everyone hap- 
pier by sparing just fifteen min- 
utes a week to dash off a quick 
note home. After all, don't you 
think your parents were just a 
little bit curious as to how 
you had been living your life 
those four years? So, the 



next time your Government profes- 
sor got that glazed look in his 
eyes and threatened to embark on 
another boring tale, you ripped out a 
sheet of paper and started writing. 
It didn't require a great literary 
effort, for your mom would proba- 
bly have been happy to receive a 
copy of your grocery list. And 
your Government teacher would have 
been thrilled to see someone take 
such copious notes. Who knows? 
Maybe next you'd find yourself 
scrubbing that brownie pan that 
had been lying in the sink since 
March. 



Parents' Weekend/37 



BELCW: Proud artists stand behind their 
frosty lady and her furry friends. 
BOTTOM: Colonial residences gain added 
appeal with the snowfall of early February. 
BOTTOM RIGHT: A lacy dusting of snow 
adorns trees and paths in Colonial 
Williamsburg. 



Hey, its 




B 



ut I came down South in 
order to get away from 
snow!" the New Jerseyite protested 
as he picked his way through 
drifts piled several feet high 
and dodged the snowballs winging 
past him. Inconvenient but comic 
was the way in which many viewed 
the strange weather which assailed 
Williamsburg this winter. After 
several uneventful months weather- 
wise, Williamsburg was hit with, 
not one, but two snowstorms with- 
in the space of two weeks. Striking 
unexpectedly, the first 
blanketing was so extensive 
that all classes, for the first 
time since most students could re- 
member, were cancelled. Instead, 
the campus became the setting 
for massive snowball fights and 
careful sculpting of snowmen. 
The hill behind Morton Hall was 
discovered to be the ideal place 
for "traying." Seated on cafe- 
teria trays, cardboard boxes and 
even innertubes one could acquire 
impressive speed and slide for 
long distances — until the bushes 
and building at the slope's foot 
proved to be effective and rath- 
er painful deterrents. 
Hardly were paths shovelled and 




38/Snow 



SNOW! 



roads cleared when the skies 
opened once more. Washington, DC 
suffered its worst snowstorm in 
over 50 years. Here in WilHams- 
burg classes were inexplicably 
held as planned, despite the fact 
that this storm was considerably 
more severe than the first. For 
Dr. Ward of the Government Depart- 
ment, this was the first time in 
eleven years that snow prevented 
him from making it to campus. For 
students living in Landrum and 
Chandler, whose cars were already 
encrusted with the ice, snow and 
slush which plows had mercilessly 
piled on them, this new snowfall 
meant that it would probably be 
March before their cars could be 
unearthed. People dug out the 
ugly boots and galoshes that in 
their adolescence they had sworn 
never to wear again. The preppie 
look now called for "duck shoes" 
over the clogs and topsiders of 
fair weather. 

Thus, as students grew 
accustomed to the inevitable down- 
pours and windstorms to which 
Williamsburg is prone, they quickly 
learned to make the most of the 
uncommon weather of the past 
winter. 



BELOW: Several inches of snow effectively 
silence the artillery surrounding the Wil- 
liamsburg arsenal. 

BOTTOM: The Courthouse Green provides i 
wide expanse for frolicking in the snow. 





Snow/39 




ABOVE: The peacefulness of dawn is mir- 
rored in the face of this soldier during 
the militia's early morning muster. 
RIGHT: Long-necked, white swans lend an 
appropriate touch of majesty to the pond 
and grounds of the Governor's Palace. 





40/Colonial Williamsburg 




LEFT: Set back from the street amidst 
stately trees and an expansive green, 
the Governor's Palace appears awesomely 
grand and impressive. 
BELOW: Williamsburg receives a new per- 
spective when viewed from a horse-drawn 
carriage. 




A blendins of centuries 



There was one thing in par- 
ticular that made the Col- 
lege of William and Mary quite a 
special institution. As a re- 
spected school of higher educa- 
tion it was the focus of academic 
and cultural activity here in the 
community. Yet it was also an 
integral part of Colonial Wil- 
liamsburg, the unique product of 
over 50 years of continuing re- 
storation and reconstruction of a 
town which, in the early years of 
the 18th century, was the capital 
of Virginia and, as such, the so- 
cial, cultural and political cen- 
ter of the colony. The town has 
become a major drawing force for 
visitors from all over the world, 
and justifiedly so. Extending a 
little over one mile from the Col- 
lege's Wren Building to the Capi- 
tol, the colonial area contains 
numerous restored residences, tav- 



erns and public buildings, varied the breaths of a balmy breeze, 

and carefully planned gardens and The townspeople contributed as 
greens; and over 25 craftshops and much to the atmosphere as did 
outdoor craft demonstrations. the cobblestoned streets and 

For the William and Mary student, carriages. The craftsman at 



the most fantastic aspect of Col- 
onial Williamsburg was that every- 
thing (well, virtually everything) 
was FREE. With a current student 
I.D. in hand, one could cheerfully 
join the hordes of tourists in 
exploring the Governor's Palace 
grounds or wandering through the 
"hallowed halls" of the Capitol. 
The town possessed so many corners 
and crannies to be discovered that 
one rarely tired of its attrac- 
tions during four years of residence 
here. The broad Palace Green was 
a fine place for a picnic on a 
lazy weekend afternoon — horses 
clopped by on cobblestoned streets 
and the chimes of the Bruton Par- 
ish bells reached one clearly on 



the cooper's shop explained 
the skill behind barrelmaking 
while stroking his full beard 
of a hue very close to that of 
the cedar curls that glided 
off his knife. At Chowning's 
tavern the balladeer with the 
glint in his eye could be counted 
on to belt out a very bawdy song 
upon request. Better not to 
blush, though, or he was likely 
to include your name in the 
next verse! 

It was surely a special oppor- 
tunity the W&M student had open 
to him, to slip in and out of 
the milieu and lifestyle of col- 
onial Virginia as whim, mood 
or moment suggested. 



Colonial WilIiamsburg/41 



BELOW: A drizzle of rain fails to dampen 
the spirits of those who attended the tra- 
ditional Yule Log ceremony. 
BOTTOM: Yuletide celebrations is 
filled with carols and holiday tales to 
thrill the young ones. 




Good 



No matter how smoothly the 
semester might have gone, 
Thanksgiving vacation was univer- 
sally regarded as an opportunity 
to escape the collegiate atmos- 
phere and reacquaint oneself with 
the comforts and pleasures of 
normal, everyday life — home- 
cooked meals, sleeping late, read- 
ing a book without highlighter 
in hand. In a few all-too-short 
days, however, the break was 
over and we had to return. And 
to what were we returning? Myriad 
papers to finish, volume upon 
volume to read and finals to 
take, all amidst the rainy, 
dreary, winter weather only Wil- 
liamsburg can sport. 

Yet it was difficult to sink 
too abysmally into those post- 
Thanksgiving blues for, while De- 
cember meant that exams were loom- 
ing closer, the first bright 
hints of the Christmas season 
were also evident. Store win- 
dows boasted festive displays 



42/Christmas 




LEFT; The holiday season sees members of 
the Russian House gathered for an evening 
of friendship, music and gift-giving. 
BELOW: Blazing torches add special 
warmth and glow to the Grand Illumination. 
BOTTOM: The Dr. Seuss favorite. How the 
Grinch Stole Christmas, delights old and 
young alike when recounted by President 
Graves attired as Saint Nick. 



tidings to all! 



(those in Merchants' Square with 
elaborate animation); wreaths be- 
gan appearing on doors and lamp- 
posts; and one could not escape 
from corny Christmas carols 
playing on every radio station. 

Colonial Williamsburg official- 
ly opened its celebration of the 
Christmas season with Grand Il- 
lumination on the mid-day of the 
month. At dusk that evening can- 
nons fired, signaling residents 
to place lighted candles in each 
window of their homes. From the 
Wren Hall to the Capitol the col- 
onial town was bright with the 
flicker of candles, the hotter 
flames of torches, and the music 
of choirs, minstrels and fife 
and drum corps who entertained 
from the porches and steps of 
colonial residences. 

Both reading period and exam 
week were lightened with spon- 
taneous and more elaborate cel- 
ebrations of the Yuletide sea- 
son. Some residences had dorm- 



wide tree-trimming parties; 
others held contests to deter- 
mine the best-decorated hall. 
Choosing the best gift for one's 
roommate required careful thought 
and the shopping provided a nec- 
essary break from the studies. 
Residence halls were filled with 
the aroma of sugar cookies and 
gingerbread. The traditional 
Yule Log ceremony in the Wren 
Courtyard was the final event 
for some students, as exams 
were nearing an end and prepar- 
ations for the trip home began. 
President Graves enchanted the 
little children and many a stu- 
dent as well with his reading 
of Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch 
Stole Christmas. While Yule- 
tide carols were sung during a 
shower of rain, rather than a 
flurry of snow, the gathering 
still showed many smiling faces 
as academic pressures and pre- 
occupations were at least momen- 
tarily left behind. 



Christmas/43 




44/Religion 



'Tamilies" join in prayer 



Sizzling hamburgers and a 
promise of close fellow- 
ship enticed freshmen to the Bap- 
tist Student Center for a picnic 
in their honor. Although swamped 
by new faces and names, within 
several weeks they were part of 
the Baptist Student Union — a close 
knit group of 70 students who 
shared in the bond of Christian 
love. 

"We can have at least two or 
three dances. We'll raise $1200 
for Summer Missions." These were 
the enthusiastic hopes for council 
members who met for a pre-school 
retreat to plan the year's activi- 
ties. Idle summer brains had to 
be jolted into gear as campus mi- 
nister Daniel Avery prompted mem- 
bers to brainstorm ideas for a 



successful year. Yet, always ea- 
ger to have fun, the group took 
a "brainstorm" break to challenge 
the waterslide (although some 
wished they hadn't!). 

Weekly meetings of the BSU in- 
cluded Sunday night dinners pre- 
pared by Peninsula Baptist Church 
ladies. Programs varying from 
talent shows to guest musicians 
followed the dinners. In addition, 
individual "family groups," where 
two students, "Mom" and "Dad", 
led their "children" in Bible study 
and prayer. Involvement in BSU 
also included devotional breakfasts, 
intramurals, choir, and bell choir. 

BSU members seized every op- 
portunity to act "wild and crazy." 
Dancing was a specialty, and they 
were often seen pretzeling to the 




Bee Gees or do-si-doeing to "Foggy 
Mountain Breakdown." 

Even though the BSU members loved 
the "social life," they did not 
forget their purpose in sharing 
the message of God's Word. On 
Thursdays, members visited the 
Pines Nursing Home. The Baptist 
Student Union also sponsored a 
college-wide Bible study with 
David Moore, and a concert by Ken 
Medema. Retreats were a special 
time. Fall and spring brought an 
uplifting weekend in the mountains 
at Eagle Eyrie. In January, the 
group enjoyed a weekend of fellow- 
ship at Eastover Plantation across 
the James River. Other big events 
included a Parent's Reception, a 
dinner for JMU BSU-ers, and a Sadie 
Hawkins dance. 

In essence, the Baptist Student 
Union was defined as fellowship. 
It was a group that rejoiced together 
in praising the name of their 
Savior. BSU was a home away from 
home where members were brothers 
and sisters in faith. 




LEFT. Family group "Mom" Janine Listrom 
and Doug Wingo listen to another member's 
interpretation of a passage in Ephesians. 
ABOVE. High's is the favored place of 
"Monroe Ladies" Jennifer Fletcher and 
Linda Beahm. 



Baptist Student Union/45 



BELOW. Evensong choir members gather 

outside of Bruton Parish Church prior 

to a Sunday night service. 

RIGHT. A student takes advantage of 

a Sunday evening home-cooked meal served 

at the Parish House. 





Boogie to the disco beat 



tt 



Get down and boogie!" With 
this cry, the Canterbury 
Association launched the Episco- 
Disco, one of several opportuni- 
ties for social fun during the 
year. The long-held belief that 
religious organizations exist 
only for worship had been chal- 
lenged by the students of Can- 
terbury, who saw their faith 
as the center of all aspects of 
life. The Episcopal ministry to 
students was an offering of ac- 
tivities open to all, with no 
membership requirements. Toget- 
her with the Catholic Student 
Association, Canterbury cele- 
brated the Feast of St. Francis 
with a service blessing the 
animals and pets of Williamsburg. 
A combined Halloween party for 
the two groups produced some 
imaginative costumes and some 
hilarious clowning. Where else 
(outside of the Medici papacy) 



could one see a belly dancer 
perched on the knee of a Cardinal? 

But Canterbury was more than 
a social activity. The members 
walked for CROP. They ministered 
to the children of Eastern State 
hospital each week. They ob- 
served the Lenten season with 
fasting and prayer, and with pro- 
jects designed to relieve pro- 
blems with constructive action. 

Canterbury was a "movable 
feast" and the year saw the 
participants on the go. They 
spent a weekend in Deltaville, 
enjoying the Chesapeake Bay in 
the last days of Indian summer 
and refreshing themselves for 
the year which lay before them; 
and they even journeyed to 
Washington in a new venture, an 
urban retreat! The highlight of 
the year's travels, however, was 
the spring retreat to Valle 
Mountains. 



The weekly services in the Wren 
Chapel, the Sunday evening ser- 
vices in Bruton Parish Church, 
the many occasions of shared 
times together all served to 
help the members through the 
rough times and gave them a 
family with whom to share the 
good times. The group, accord- 
ing to Chaplain Sam Portaro, 
hoped to be a living symbol of 
the truth that those who come 
together with all their di- 
versity, sharing their differ- 
ences, could be a positive force 
for good, a lively witness to 
the Christian Gospel. For those 
in Canterbury who have shared 
the diversity and celebrated the 
fullness of life, the words of 
the Episcopal liturgy are a 
fitting and proper dismissal for 
the year" "The Lord be with 
you . . . and with thy spirit." 



46/Canterbury Association 



Relaxing in the^Catacoml? 



As part of its ministry, 
the Catholic Student Asso- 
ciation reached out to all 
Catholic students on campus. 
Participants in the CSA strove 
to be living witnesses of their 
faith within the Catholic tradi- 
tion through their spiritual and 
social ministries. 

The focal point of their spiri- 
tual ministry was the Sunday cele- 
bration of the Eucharist. The 
liturgy committee sought to offer 
a wide variety of experiences 
ranging from folk music and 
liturgical dance to slide medi- 
tations and dramatic presentations 



of the Scriptures. Students were 
given the opportunity to worship 
during the week at Tuesday 
evening Masses in the Wren Chapel 
and Thursday and Friday morning 
Masses in the campus dormitories. 

Table fellowship was seen as 
an important follow up to Sun- 
day Eucharist, giving students a 
chance to relax over "home- 
cooked" food and quiet conver- 
sation. 

Recognizing not only the need 
to pray, but also to pray together, 
the association readied a 
new student room, "The Cata- 
combs," over the summer months. 




The room was used as a gather- 
ing place, as well as for comm- 
ittee meetings. 

During the Homecoming weekend, 
CSA hosted several James Madison 
students. After the football 
game, guests were treated to 
live entertainment in a Gambol's 
atmosphere with Colonial games 
and ballads. Tradition and 
merriment went hand in hand as 
students celebrated the feasts 
of St. Valentine and St. Patrick. 

Thus the Catholic Student 
Association, under the direc- 
tion of campus minister Fr. 
Ron Seguin, aptly provided an 
atmosphere whereby a student 
explored, celebrated, and pro- 
claimed his faith through com- 
munity sharing, support, and 
prayer. 



LEFT. Catholic choir members provide 
music during Mass. 

BELOW. "The Catacombs" provides a re- 
laxing atmosphere for a discussion led 
by Father Seguin. 




Catholic Student Association/47 



Reaching out to students 



With God, all things are 
possible." So quoted Mrs. 
Lois Hornsby, advisor of the 
Christian Science Organization. 
To the students at William and 
Mary, the things that seem im- 
possible were those days of 
tests, papers, and constant 
studying. Through the CSO, Mrs. 
Hornsby worked with students to 
keep college trials in the pro- 
per perspective. 

Every Thursday night at the 
Campus Center, the CSO met for 
a personal renewal of faith. 
On an alternate basis, each mem- 
ber was responsible for readings 



which were taken from the 
Christian Science textbook and 
from the Bible. 

Holidays brought special ac- 
tivities for the Christian 
Scientists. They assisted with 
the Ecumenical Service on Thanks- 
giving, and also sponsored a 
lecture entitled, "Become What 
You Are." The Christmas season 
found members caroling through 
the campus and wrapping gifts. 

The group's activities in- 
cluded Bible studies, excur- 
sions to Virginia Beach, alumni 
activities, and an occasional 
cruise on the York River. 



The CSO reached out to aid 
the community in order to em- 
phasize that "all things are 
possible." They provided tu- 
torial services as well as a 
listening ear for those who 
needed aid and understanding. 

BELOW: In the home of Mrs. Lois Hornsby, 
Christian Science members Steve Ruff, Doug 
McDonald, Karen Tolson, Martha Schirmer, 
Heidi Schweinfurth, Steve Seele, John 
McCoy and Mrs. Hornsby gather for dinner. 




48/Christian Science Organization 




FCA shares fello^vship 




ABOVE: Accompanied by Bill Bryan and 
Kevin Odor, Ginger Harvey joins in an 
opening song. 

BELOW: Graduate Rolfe Carawan returns 
to an FCA meeting to share fellowship. 



They called themselves a 
"Huddle." Actually, they 
were a group of athletes who 
huddled together for meaningful 
solidity through Christ. The 
Fellowship of Christian Ath- 
letes was composed of fifty 
members, both male and female 
sports enthusiasts. 

Under the guidance of sponsor 
Bob Sherman, and officers Kevin 
Odor, President; Ginger Harvey, 
Vice-President; and Ginger 
Allen, Secretary, the FCA met 
on Thursday evenings to create 
intimate camaraderie through 
singing, prayer and discussion. 
The gatherings were highlighted 
by a New Testament lesson; and 
guest speakers were often fea- 
tured. 

As athletes, the group was. 



of course, active in sports- 
oriented activities: Im- 
promptu football games were 
not uncommon. Still, FCA 
members were sincere in their 
faith and wanted to share it; 
on occasion, they conducted 
worship services at various 
churches, or spoke to a num- 
ber of community organizations. 
Several active members also 
attended the National FCA 
conference during the summer. 
The FCA was unique in that 
all the members shared two 
common interests: sports and 
Christian faith. Athletes 
had a Christian community 
open to them, and as Bob 
Sherman stated, "I'm there 
because I want to be, not 
because I was asked to be." 



Fellowship of Christian Fellowship/49 




United as a loving family 



For a student to maintain 
his mental stability, it 
was essential to know someone 
actually cared that he had a 
P-Chem test coming up, and that 
someone was actually concerned 
whether or not he went off the 
deep end while studying for it. 
Mom and Dad were no longer around 
to pat their child on the shoul- 
der and tell him he was loved 
whether he flunked or passed; 
nor were they around to say it 
was normal to be sitting in a 
trance watching the numbers on 
the calculator double as the "X" 
was constantly punched. An on- 
campus emotional outlet seemed 
to be demanded. The Lutheran 
Student Association saw this 
need and set its goal 
for the year accordingly: "to be 
for each other a Christian 
family away from home." 



Under the leadership of Reverend 
H. B. Lutz and President Chip 
Austin, Lutherans as well as non- 
Lutherans gathered twice weekly: 
on Sunday nights for a general 
meeting and on Thursday for an 
informal prayer meeting. There, 
students found sympathetic ears 
and a common empathy for their 
daily struggles. The Sunday 
night sessions also met the de- 
mands of a stomach deprived of 
home cooking, as students pre- 
pared dinner following the meet- 
ing. Other than the regular 
gatherings, students met at con- 
gregation members' houses, attend- 
ed speeches by William and Mary 
faculty and participated in a 
Christmas Candlelight Service. 

The humdrum routine of going 
to classes, studying, eating, 
and sleeping was enlivened as 
students participated in 



painting St. Stephen's church 
and sailing on Lake Matoaka. 
The group also gathered for 
occasional picnicking at 
Virginia Beach and attended 
various retreats throughout 
the year. 

Through the Lutheran Student 
Association, students were part 
of a large substitute family 
where the members shared common 
struggles and joys as Christ- 
ian students. A member con- 
cluded, "We have to band to- 
gether and be a family to one 
another, and to care for one 
another." 

ABOVE: A canoe trip on the College's 
Lake Matoaka provides fun times, fellow- 
ship, and a quick escape from the books 
as Lutheran students soon discover. The 
LSA is more than a religious organization. 
It is an opportunity to relax and unwind. 



50/Lutheran Student Association 



Students ^velcome respite 



A challenge to "become res- 
ponsible members of the 
body of Christ" was the goal of 
the Wesley Foundation. Students 
were asked to respond in their 
daily lives to Christ's love as 
a transformation of faith rather 
than simply mold it into a com- 
fortable theology. Wesley of- 




fered an atmosphere by which 
members could unite in their 
faith. 

To participants, the Wesley 
Foundation meant a home-cooked 
meal and a program on Sunday 
evenings, which were alternately 
prepared by students. The pro- 
grams included discussions on 
God's reconciling love. Chris- 
tian responses to world hunger 
and poverty, and Christian ser- 
vanthood. 

"Home" for Wesley members was 
located on Jamestown Road. It 
provided a respite from a clut- 
tered and noisy dorm as well as 

ABOVE: Weekly gatherings and friendly 
conversation loosen tensions of Wesley 
Foundation members. Campus Minister 
Braxton AUport often participates 
in these gatherings. 

BELOW: Candlelight provides a relaxing 
atmosphere for Wesley members as they 
enjoy a student prepared dinner. 



a welcomed taste of home life. 
Students gathered to talk, study, 
watch television, cook, and 
play chess. 

Special programs brightened 
the college days. The year's 
activities began with a home- 
made ice cream bash which fol- 
lowed the first football game. 
A fall retreat explored "Build- 
ing the Body of Christ Through 
Missions" in the country atmos- 
phere of Camp Westview on the 
James River. To aid the cam- 
paign for world hunger and 
clothing relief, members 
joined in a CROP walk. 

Most importantly, the Wesley 
Foundation meant people — 
people who formed close friend- 
ships, comforted one another, 
and rejoiced together. Wesley 
members agreed, through Jesus 
Christ's redeeming love, more 
"than all that we ask or think" 
was possible. (Ephesians 3:20). 




I 



Wesley Foundation/51 




ABOVE: As the leader of his core group, 
Mike Mellis heads the discussion. 
RIGHT; A discussion on Ephesians intri- 
gues Eric Meyer during a core group 
meeting. 




IV seeks understanding 



On Friday evenings, Mil- 
lington Auditorium lost its 
echo of alleles, endoplasmic 
reticulum, and microtubules of 
8 a.m. biology and was filled 
with the melody of four 
guitars, a banjo, and a fiddle. 
This music marked the beginning 
of the weekly William and Mary 
Christian Fellowship meeting. 
Topics for the meetings varied. 
Senior Cathy Allin, attired in 
combat boots, a flannel shirt, 
and pith helmet, related her 
experiences as a summer 
missionary in Mali, Africa. 
September brought noted 
theologian Ross Guiness to 
William and Mary as his first 



stop on an American tour. 
His topic was on "Thinking 
Christianity." 

The purpose of WMCF was to 
act as a community, as well 
as a source of learning. 
President Ray Souza explained 
WMCF was "to challenge in- 
dividuals to seek out God and 
to discover His will for their 
lives." This teaching was 
accomplished partly by the 
"core groups" which met once 
a week for Bible study. 

Yet, the WMCF activities 
were not limited to meetings. 
Often a group of students were 
found at Frank's Truck Stop or 
at an impromptu picnic in 



Yorktown. Many WMCF functions 
offered social bonuses and 
opportunities for leadership 
and service, as well as pro- 
viding a setting that facil- 
itated close friendships with 
members of both sexes. 

WMCF members shared the com- 
mon goal of desiring to work 
for a fuller understanding of 
God and a closer personal re- 
lationship with Him. In the 
words of the year's theme, they 
sought to "count all things to 
be loss in view of the sur- 
passing value of knowing Christ 
Jesus." (Philippians 3:8). 



52AVilliam and Mary Christian Fellowship 



Accessibility practiced 




It was shocking enough for 
a religious organization 
to sponsor an Episco Disco, but 
to see the chaplain, dressed 
as a student, pretzeling to 
"Staying Alive" was against all 
tradition. But participating 
with students in activities was 
a large part of the ministry of 
Father Sam Portaro, the Epis- 
copalian Campus Minister. 

Born in Maryland, Father 
Portaro was raised in High 
Point, North Carolina. He 
received His B.S. with honors 
in English at the University 
of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill, and continued at the 
Virginia Episcopal Theological 
Church for his Master of Divin- 



ity degree. 

Father Portaro explained how 
he became a campus minister 
"by the back door." During a 
visit to Williamsburg, he 
found there was an opening for 
an Episcopal chaplain. Even 
though he was serving a parish 
in North Carolina at the time, 
Father Portaro decided to 
accept the position and move 
to Williamsburg in the fall 
of 1976. 

So, Father Portaro estab- 
lished himself with Bruton 
Parish Church and the Canter- 
bury Association and became 
known to students as "Sam." 
Seen with a group of students, 
it was hard to distinguish who 



A COMMUNION SERVICE is closed with 
a song led by Father Portaro. 

was the minister. He explained 
that the reasons for his mode 
of dress and participation with 
students as being two-fold: 
to remind students, as well as 
himself, that he is only 
human; and to remind himself 
that Jesus worked among His 
people and was not set apart 
from them. Also he agreed, 
"There are times when a 
collar will put people off." 

Father Portaro described his 
position as "a ministry of 
accessibility." He was ex- 
tremely satisfied with his 
position and made every ef- 
fort to meet the student's 
needs. At lunch he was 
found in the Wigwam and dur- 
ing the day he was in his 
office as much as was possible. 
Father Portaro was a counsel 
to students who needed aid, 
although he smiled and brag- 
ged, "It's a healthy bunch 
of kids around here." 

Fulfilling his position as 
a chaplain. Father Portaro 
was responsible for Sunday 
night Evensong services at 
Bruton Parish Church and 
Thursday afternoon Communion 
at the Wren Chapel, both of 
which were attended by stu- 
dents. He felt that both the 
church and the students 
benefited from one another — 
the church gained from its 
association with the students, 
and the students were able to 
keep in touch with reality 
through participation in the 
church. 

Father Portaro was both a 
Christian father to turn to 
when in need, as well as an 
invaluable friend who joined 
in the activities that make 
college life so exciting. 



Father Portaro/53 




54AVork 





II In 



cademics at William and 
Mary was a series of per- 
sonal decisions. Foremost among 
these was the choice of a major 
field of study. With this choice 
went the selection of an academic 
advisor and specific courses of 
study. Luckily, these decisions 
were geared to personal prefer- 
ences of the student. William 
and Mary realized that each stu- 
dent had different interests and 
needs. The selection of courses 
clearly showed this. Although 
the College required a certain 
amount of study in three broad 
areas — the humanities, social 
sciences, and sciences — the stu- 
dent chose what interested him 
within these areas. And in his 
major field of study, the Wil- 
liam and Mary student had a 
range of possibilities. Some 
majors required more specific 
courses than others, but all gave 
the student a certain amount of 
freedom of choice. 

Therefore, work, for the Wil- 
liam and Mary student had a 
personal dimension just as all 
other aspects of the College 
did. It required the individual 
decision of each student. 
Hopefully, this personal 
dimension would remain at Wil- 
liam and Mary. 



I 



Work/55 




56/ Administration 



Which WAy should we turn? 



So just what is this place, 
anyway? The College of Wil- 
liam and Mary is a state univer- 
sity that refuses to drop the 
word "college" from its title. 
We are an academic institution 
with a fine reputation national- 
ly — even though few people out- 
side of Virginia realize that 
William and Mary hasn't been a 
private school for over sixty 
years now. And with the econo- 
mic crunch coming down on us at 
top speed, W&M is faced with a 
crucial decision: exactly who 
are we, and where are we going 
from here? 

The administration staff was 
more than well aware of the fine 
line that W&M walked between re- 
maining the small personal col- 
lege that it has been in the 
past, and being pressured by va- 
rious sources to expand into a 
more-typically large state uni- 
versity. The issue was multi- 
faceted, and could hardly be seen 
in terms of black and white. 
While the attractive quality of 
a unified nature was present, the ad- 
vantages of a large insti- 
tution that offerred a multitude 
of varied and unusual courses, and 
thereby attracted a diversified 
faculty and student body, were just 
as apparent. But the disad- 
vantages of both systems could 




not be ignored. Was there any 
middle ground left to trod? 

And as everyone on campus knew, 
the perennial financial consi- 
derations played a major role in 
the situation. Threatened facul- 
ty and administration cutbacks, 
expansion of housing facilities, 
construction of a new law school 
building, continued arguments 
over the merits of Division 1-A 
football, a decidedly visible 
final push toward the nineteen 
million dollar goal of the five 
year long "Campaign for the Col- 
lege," a growing student popu- 
lation, along with a tuition 
rate ever inching upward, all 



ABOVE: Common to all administrators, 
Susan Albert, Associate Dean for Stu- 
dent Development, handles daily prob- 
lems that occur in college life. 

added their own dimensions to 
the question of William and 
Mary's status as an academic in- 
stitution. A number of administra- 
tors were asked to offer their per- 
sonal insights to the Echo, which 
have been printed verbatim here. 
The questions were intentionally 
broad and the answers sometimes 
vague, but it seemed clear that 
the fundamental situation had 
been on everyone's mind for 
some time. 



Administration/57 



Thomas A. Graves reflected 
thoughtfully on the direc- 
tions he has seen William and 
Mary take during his eight -year 
tenure as president, as well as 
speculating on our future. 

Is William and Mary a 'col- 
lege' or a 'university? ' 

"I see us as a university, 
since we offer broad graduate 
programs in business adminis- 
tration, law, education, ma- 
rine science, and the arts and 
sciences .... But having said 
that, we do not make the claim 
to the pretenses of a compre- 
hensive university .... with 
an extremely wide range of grad 
programs, like UVa. or Harvard, 
for example. We are, as a univer- 
sity, putting our major emphasis 
on the college of this univer- 
sity — namely, the undergradu- 
ate program .... I see a rela- 
tionship between the grads . . . 
and the experience of the stu- 
dents at the undergrad level; 
I see a relationship between 
the several parts that make up 



this whole. We stress a broad 
emphasis on a liberal arts edu- 
cation — both at the college 
and graduate level." 

Do you see any strains in 
this dual role? 

"I think that in any institu- 
tion that is trying to do an 
excellent job there are bound 
to be strains . . . competition 
for resources. I see this as 
good, not bad. Each part of the 
university is trying to find 
its place in the sun — to do 
its job exceptionally well .... 
I see a good balance . . . the 
MBA, law schools believe that 
we are providing them with the 
resources to enable them to rise 
to the top ranks in their fields. 
At the same time, though un- 
doubtedly our attention has 
shifted in the past fifteen 
years toward . . . the graduate 
level, I think that seven- 
ty-five percent of our students 
and faculty in the College con- 
tinue to believe that we are 
not lessening the importance of 



UPPER RIGHT: President Thomas Graves 
hosts the freshman reception as one of 
his first public duties. He is pic- 
tured here listening to Ruth Collin's 
initial impressions of the college. 
RIGHT: Perhaps more closely con- 
nected with the inflationary tenden- 
cies of today's society than other 
administrators, Vice President for 
Business Affairs, William Carter re- 
mains constantly aware of economic 
fluctuations. 



58/Administration 




We are a unIque uNivERsixy'' 




that mission. Fifteen years ago 
we had no Ph.D. or MBA programs. 
These have been added, but with- 
in the context of the fundamen- 
tal mission of this university." 

Where are we going in the 
future? 

"I believe that there will 
continue to be a desire and 



need within Virginia and the 
broader area we serve for this 
particular kind of institution. 
We are an almost unique state 
university — I can't think of 
another one like us. As long as 
we continue to do exceptionally 
well, we can resist the pres- 
sures that are on us now; to 
grow, for example, into just 
another state university . . . 



We plan to remain relatively 
small, and continue to attract 
the exceptionally talented stu- 
dents and faculty that we have 
now. This will not be an easy 
task, as in the foreseeable fu- 
ture resources will be small 
for colleges in the state, and 
nationally as well. We will 
fight hard for those resources; 
we will get our fair share." 



Administration/59 



ON Its FouNclATioNs'^ 



UJ 

"o 
O 

H 
uu 

O 




LEFT: As new appointee of both Dean 
of the Undergraduate Programs and As- 
sistant Vice President for Academic 
Affairs, Professor Linda Reilly re- 
laxes briefly before beginning her next 
administrative duty. 
BELOW: Academic Affairs Vice Pres- 
ident George Healy prepares notes taken 
at the last faculty meeting so that 
they can be filed for future reference. 




The personnel near the top 
of the administration hier- 
archy generally seemed optimistic. 

How do you see William and Mary? 

Linda Reilly, Asst. Academic 
Affairs: "... a small university, 
. . . with the inherent strengths 
and weaknesses of that . . . struc- 
ture . . ." 

Charles Toomajian, Registrar's 
Office: "(We) strive to accentu- 
ate the qualities of a college 
by providing a strong undergradu- 
ate base while offering gradu- 
ate programs in those areas 



where we have special strengths." 

Do you see any problems stem- 
ming from W&M's dual role? 

Stanley Brown, Placement: "I 
don't see any strain. There may 
be some employers who do not 
realize our university flavor 
because of the title." 

Robert Hunt, Admissions: "The 
control of enrollment does put 
a great deal of pressure on the 
admission staff in that we . . . 
take criticism from the many 
capable applicants that are de- 
nied admission. Despite this. 



I support a selective admis- 
sion process since I think this 
is one of the important factors 
that has made the institution 
strong. The continued use of the 
historical name of the College 
of William and Mary does require 
the admission staff to work hard 
at communicating the fact that 
we are a university ..." 

What direction do you predict 
for the future? 

Brown: "... Our future seems to 
be directed even more toward the 
university role. The title, how- 



60/Administration 




UPPER LEFT: Freshmen, transfer, and 
graduate students' applications all have 
a common denominator; whether accepted 
or rejected, they must pass through 
the office of Robert Hunt. 
UPPER RIGHT; Senior seminars "arranged by 
Stanley Brown, Director of Corporate 
Relations and Planning, assist students 
with career plans. 
LEFT; In order to iron out trouble 
spots encountered during scheduling, 
Charles Toomajian, Director of Student 
Records, personally reviews data com- 
piled from previous semesters. 
BELOW; Application to the School of 
Business Administration can not be 
submitted until one's junior year. 
New admissions are the main concern of 
Anthony Sancetta, Associate Dean for 
Undergraduate Studies. 



ever, The College of William and 
Mary in Virginia, has a unique 
appeal." 

Hunt: "I hope we will continue 
in the same direction in the fu- 
ture. Expansion of programs and 
enrollment should be done very 
cautiously." 

Reilly: "... the College will 
remain the same, will add a few 
programs . . . and continue to con- 
centrate on excellence in every 
aspect . . . We are all waiting and 
watching to see what the new 
curriculum review produces; and 
this process may show us some 
new directions." 




Administration/61 



Deans that dealt with gra- 
duate school matters felt 
particularly strongly about the 
College's status as a university. 

What are we — a college, a 
university, or both? 

John Selby, Arts and Sciences, 
Graduate Studies: "Since William 
and Mary acts as a university 
only in a restricted number of 
areas, its effort is proportional 
to its needs in these areas. But 
with that qualification, I beli- 
eve that it acts equally as a 
college and a university." 

Jack Edwards, Arts and Sciences, 
Faculty: "... I see the two parts 



as complementary rather than as 
competing . . .." 

James Yankovich, School of Edu- 
cation: "It continues to act as 
a college rather than as a uni- 
versity. The prevailing charac- 
ter .. . is that of a residential 
undergraduate school . . . the pro- 
fessional schools and graduate 
programs are emerging. The goal 
should be to preserve the best 
of the undergraduate program and 
stimulate . . . the advancement of 
the professional schools. The fu- 
ture of William and Mary lies 
in its development as a first- 
rate university. There is no 
other rational alternative as a 
public institution." 



Do you see any strains in 
our present status? 

Edwards: "Strains are inevi- 
table because all programs need 
resources, but natural strains 
need not be damaging ones. It is 
necessary that we obtain enough 
resources for both undergraduate 
and graduate programs." 

Yankovich: "The strains result 
from the competition for scarce 
resources in terms of budget and 
faculty . . . When we default on our 
responsibilities of service to 
schools and other educationally- 
related agencies, we strengthen 
the competing schools who do 
meet the challenges." 



£1 

C 



H 

2 
(/I 



m 
m 





LEFT: Interdisciplinary degrees have 
added to the complexity of Associate 
Dean of Arts and Sciences David Kran- 
buehl's concerns. 

ABOVE: Prospective graduate students 
in pursuit of an M.B.A. must apply to 
the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, 
William O'Connell, Jr. 
RIGHT: Three programs of study, two 
in accounting and one in management, 
are offered to students enrolled in 
the School of Business Administration, 
of which Charles Quittmeyer is Dean. 



"" be dAiviAqiNq ones" 



62/Administration 



What do you see happening at 
W&M in future years? 

David Kranbuehl, Arts and 
Sciences Associate Dean of 
Faculty: "Expanding our gradu- 
ate programs in areas which 
would complement and strengthen 
the undergraduate program." 

Yankovich: "(It) will protect 
its excellent academic reputa- 
tion .... However, enrollment 
growth at all levels will be neces- 
sitated because of the fiscal al- 
location policies of the General 
Assembly. The College will be- 
come more of a university . . . ." 





ABOVE: Specific areas of study are 
planned within broad general degree re- 
quirements under the School of Arts and 
Sciences headed by Dean Jack Edwards. 
LEFT: Former legislator of Virginia, 
William Spong, recently became involved 
with another aspect of the state's 
judiciary process when named Dean of 
Marshall-Wythe School of Law. 



Administration/63 



^^We run a reaI Risk^ unUss 



ff 



• • • 




The diversity inherent in 
both the administrators' 
jobs and their personalities sur- 
faced in their differing view. 

Does W&M strive foremost to 
act as a college or university'? 

Leroy Moore, Minority Affairs: 
". . . its first and foremost at- 
tention is on its undergradu- 
ates. The character of the in- 
stitution as well as its make- 
up strongly suggest it is a col- 
lege and not a university ..." 

John Morgan, Residence Hall 
Life: "My opinion is that the 
William and Mary mission is not 
shared to the same degree by all 
the persons involved with the 
College. I wish very much that 
this were not so. As a college's 
mission is viewed by all . . . as it 
is the same, the impact on students' 
development is enhanced." 

Do any tensions, or advantages, 
arise from this situation? 



64/Administration 




ABOVE; As Associate Dean of Student 
Activities and Organizations, Kenneth 
Smith coordinates all student functions 
on the William and Mary campus. 
ABOVE RIGHT: Dean of Students, Sam 
Sadler attributes the increasing trend 
of going on to graduate school to the 
tight job market. 

BELOW RIGHT: Rhodes Scholarships, the 
Exeter Program, and the Cambridge summer 
school program are just a few of the many 
extramural activities handled by Joseph 
Healey, Associate Dean of Extramural 
Programs. 



Hik-sq^^ 




Harriet Reid, Career Counse- 
ling: "... I believe that staffing 
in the advising and counseling 
areas will suffer most as Wil- 
liam and Mary grows. I think 
this is to the detriment of the 
students .... I need help in order 
to do a good job of helping stu- 
dents assess their interest . . . 
for proper career planning . . . . " 

Leon Looney, Financial Aid: 
"Aside from the fact that (we) 



FAR LEFT: The changes in Basic Grants 
and loan opportunities is a constant 
concern of Leon Looney, Director of 
Student Aid. 

LEFT: The office of Leroy Moore, 
Dean of Minority and Commuting Students 
is a place for members of the College's 
minority and day student populations to 
stop in for information or reference to 
necessary materials. 
BELOW: The need to receive 
constant feedback from people in rela- 
ted positions prompts Dean Jack Morgan 
of Residence Hall Life to meet with Barb 
Nanzig and JBT Area Coordinator Dave 
Garland. 



. . . could use additional finan- 
cial aid dollars, I api not aware 
of tensions . . . between graduate 
and undergraduate segments of 
the College for the somewhat li- 
mited resources .... If there is 
an advantage in working with 
limited funds, perhaps it is 
that a higher degree of thought- 
ful consideration enters into 
the decision process before com- 
mitments are made." 

Wesley Wilson, Affirmative Ac- 
tion: "The only strain ... is the 
lack of awareness . . . people have 
of the dual role. We portray 
the college image so well that 
we must continually explain the 
university status and opportu- 
nities. Once the misunderstan- 
dings have been explained, the 
advantages become obvious." 

What is ahead for W&M? 

Morgan: "I hope the College 
will work collaboratively to en- 



hance the learning of the indi- 
vidual student. We run a real 
risk, unless we can agree to 
work together toward this goal, 
of reducing the impact of Wil- 
liam and Mary upon the students." 

Wilson: "... William and Mary 
is widely known among certain 
circles of our society and, as 
more minority students are gra- 
duated, the reputation of the 
College will also be broadened. 
There will always be a need for 
highly selective and presti- 
gious educational institutions." 

Looney: "As one reviews the 
history of the College, one rea- 
lizes that in almost 300 years we 
have retained many similarities 
to the past. We still graduate 
fine educators, lawyers, and 
many individuals who receive na- 
tional recognition in . . . many 
other disciplines related to the 
arts and sciences. I suspect the 
future of the College will re- 
main very similar to the past." 




Administration/65 



RIGHT: The safety and well being of the 
college community and its property is 
the primary concern of Harvey Gunson, 
Director of Campus Security. 
BELOW: Even a doctor's son requires 
medical attention occasionally. Here 
Dr. Richard Cilley, Director of the 
Student Health Center checks over his 
eldest son, Gary. 





Those administrators who 
dealt directly with student 
services, be it for physical, 
mental or intellectual health, 
tended to reflect the same con- 
cern over the future of the Col- 
lege that the rest of their col- 
leagues on campus had expressed. 

In your personal opinion, does 
William and Mary strive foremost 
to fulfill the role of a college, 
or a university? 

Dr. Richard Cilley, Student 
Health: "When I arrived in January 
1973, W&M was already a small uni- 



versity ... in that it consisted 
of several colleges, eg. law 
school, business school, etc., . . . 
in addition to the main undergra- 
duate body. However each compo- 
nent's total size has remained 
small enough for the "whole" to mas- 
querade as a college. The feedback 
I receive from students and other 
administrators is to remain "small 
and personal." 

Dr. Jay Chambers, Psychological 
Services: "Primarily, the William 
and Mary community identifies it- 
self as a liberal arts and sciences 
college. The fact that we have 
some graduate departments, profes- 



sional schools, and considerable 
faculty research provides us with 
an alternative secondary identity 
as a small university." 

In your professional capacity 
do you see any strain between this 
apparent dual role? 

Chambers: "There are obvious 
economic advantages to having a 
full university identity and sta- 
tus. Universities are funded more 
generously than colleges and can, 
in some ways, operate more econo- 
mically. For example, the computer 
and library facilities required 



66/ Administration 



^^SmaII ENouqk to 



RIGHT: Except for a small sign beside 
the door there is little to distinguish 
the Center for Psychological Services 
on 125 Richmond Road from the surround- 
ing buildings. Director Jay Chambers 
pauses by the front gate to admire the 
peaceful setting as he goes inside. 
BELOW: In order to expand hours and 
reduce time students must wait for 
medical advice, a fourth physician, 
Dr. Joseph Black, was added to the Stu- 
dent Health Center's staff in the fall. 





I/I 

c 

c 
m 

m 

> 



O 
O 

m 

Si 
m 



for adequate graduate study and 
faculty research at a 600 student 
mini-university which wishes to 
maintain high quality programs 
might also be adequate for a 20,000 
student medium-sized university. 
There is a limited analogy here 
to a small shop and a department 
store .... a department store can 
operate more economically per vo- 
lume of business than a shop. 
There is a belief among some, how- 
ever, that a small shop can, in 
some cases, offer more personali- 
zed services and better quality 
merchandise." 



What direction do you see the 
College taking in the future? 

John D. Haskell, Acting Libra- 
rian: "While I have been at the 
College only for a very short time, 
I sense that in the future the in- 
stitution will be emphasizing its 
role as a university, as evidenced 
by recent announcements by the 
Board of Visitors of plans for new 
master's and doctoral level pro- 
grams. 

Chambers: "W&M could expand in 
enrollment and move toward full 
university status. This might pro- 
vide us with a nationally known 



football team and higher faculty 
salaries. However, I would rather 
see W&M remain at its present size 
and structure and become an experi- 
mental center for higher education. 
. . . since our students are bright 
and highly motivated, and since 
our faculty is excellent, we could 
devise, develop, critique and re- 
fine new higher education programs. 
These innovative programs could 
then become models for other col- 
leges and universities. . . ." 

Cilley: ". . .1 personally hope 
that no matter what the size, there 
will never be abandonment of the 
personal contact between people." 



Administration/67 



The status of varsity athle- 
tics on campus had been a 
topic of major debate for several 
years. Yet the controversy over 
how much our sports teams reflected 
or should have reflected the Col- 
lege as a whole didn't seem to 
persuade the men stationed in Wil- 
liam and Mary Hall to fight in 
favor of greater enrollment ex- 
pansion. 

Personally, how do you view 
W&M? As a college or university? 

Lester Hooker, Director of 
W&M Hall: "I feel that William 
and Mary is striving to fulfill 
the role of a university. I per- 



sonally favor . . . the intimate 
surroundings of a student body 
that will not become so large 
that they become mere numbers in 
a class .... A personal relation- 
ship with each student is impor- 
tant to both the student and the 
professor. 

I hate to think of the student 
body becoming much larger than 
it is now. If it does I feel 
William and Mary will lose some 
of its appeal." 

Do you have any special insights 
into strains that may be present 
because of the College's apparent 
dual nature? 



Hooker; "I personally do not 
see any strain .... However, I 
feel there is continuing pressure 
to both keep the College as it is 
and to expand in all directions. 
Yet, I would prefer William and 
Mary to be known as one of the 
best small colleges in Virginia 
rather than just another state 
university." 

What do you see up ahead in the 
College's future? 

Hooker: "I hope that I am wrong 
but I feel the College is going 
to acquiesce to the continuing 
pressure to emulate the univer- 
sity role." 



s 



> 

z 

3 




3 AMONq STATE UNivERSmES . . /^ 



68/ Administration 



""We should bE 

DROTECTEdt cIlERisllEC^ CEUbRATEcl'' 




I ^- 



ABOVE: Trophies lining the office walls 
of Director of Athletics, Ben Camevale, 
attest to the physical skills of student 
athletes. 

ABOVE LEFT: William and Mary Hall Dir- 
ector Lester Hooker is a familiar sight 
in and around the Hall. He schedules 
all events ranging from cultural to 
athletic. 



There was grave concern among 
our administrators for the 
future of William and Mary. It 
was not always a crucial, nor even 
a constant concern on a daily 
basis, but the recent economic 
situation of the nation at large 
had come to rest heavily on the 
shoulders of the College admini- 
stration. Although a number of indi- 
viduals would have liked more money 
and attention focused on their 
particular programs, few were 
looking forward to the expansion 
of the W&M population with 
great relish. But as is often 
the case, wishes and realities 
were at rather a stand-off. 
And perhaps it would seem 
that the reality — a serious 
lack of anything but bare-bones 
financial funding — had the up- 
per hand in the struggle. But if 
the strong desires of the Col- 
lege's administrators continue to 
offer firm resistance to the en- 
croaching realities, maybe W&M 
could still keep walking that tight- 
rope we recognize today. In the 
words of George R. Healy, Vice 
President for Academic Affairs: 

" 'Unique' is an overworked and 
usually incorrectly used word, 
but I believe it is applied with 
perfect correctness to William 



and Mary. There is no other state- 
supported institution quite like 
William and Mary, and very few 
come even reasonably close. The 
characteristics that continue to 
create this uniqueness should, I 
believe, be protected, cherished, 
and celebrated. One of these cha- 
racteristics is institutional 
size. No one knows what the per- 
fect size of a college or univer- 
sity should be. But for an insti- 
tution that affects William and 
Mary's values and commitments, 
especially our high academic stan- 
dards and concern for the indi- 
vidual student in a residential 
and humane environment, it is 
clear, to me at least, that ex- 
pansion to the large size of 
most of our state universities 
is undesirable and destructive. 
There are many such universities, 
some of them excellent. But none 
of them offers, in my judgement, 
the peculiar and wonderful combi- 
nations that makes William and 
Mary what it is, and I hope that 
we may be strong enough, and wise 
enough, to resist the siren songs 
of the unlimited growth advocates, 
and thus keep William and Mary in 
that respect, as it is in so many 
others, special, different, and 
in the truest sense, unique." 



Administration/69 




70/Academics 



MTWThF Hassles 



Anticlimactically ending 
a kaleidoscopic array of 
personalized, small-group ori- 
entation activities this fall 
was the not-so-intimate intro- 
duction to freshmen of the 
tough academic facet of W&M 
during course registration. 
The highly-touted, personalized 
atmosphere of the College was 
inevitably questioned as an 
entering class of 1080 fresh- 
men mandated a computerized 
pairing of enrollee and class- 
room seat. A name was rele- 
gated in importance solely to 
alphabetize entrance; then, 
numbers dictated the ensuing 
W&M Hall vigil. Frustrations 
unmatched at this early point 
in the college career mounted 
as the all-important course 
around which the semester's 
classes were centered closed 
out just prior to a turn at the 
callously manned registration 
table. Indeed, lucky was the 
freshman who left the scene with 
a schedule resembling the one 
so carefully designed days 
before; even this student, how- 




ever, would uneasily anticipate 
the spring semester's "pick up 
registration materials" notice. 

That such mechanization may 
have marked a turning point in 
college days was hard to 
believe. Perhaps only seniors, 
while enjoying pre-registration 
convenience, nevertheless dis- 
covered that the seemingly 
unenticing course signed-up- 
for inspired concentration in 
that discipline or intro- 
duced a fascinating aspect of 
the College otherwise unlikely 
to have been encountered. 
Thus, computerization may not 
have been so brutal, and, des- 
pite its apparent denial of a 
"personal" college experience, 
the randomness of numbers may 
nonetheless have cultivated the 
"well-rounded" student in the 
liberal arts tradition. 



LEFT: Sometimes there's no choice but 
to sit down and start all over 
again. 

BELOW: The awful realization is that 
registration marks only the begin- 
ning of a hectic semester. 




Feature/71 



Let there be football... 



Well, how about that? Student 
activism, long eulogized by 
the '70's media as gone and basi- 
cally forgotten, lived; and pret- 
ty loudly too, at least for awhile. 
Lived at William and Mary, of all 
infamously-labelled conservative 
strongholds. Lived with not only 
rebellious students leaping into 
the fray (so to speak), but agi- 
tated professors and up-in-arms 
citizens jumping with them — and 
sometimes ahead of them. And 
lived long enough to gamer a lit- 
tle national attention, before 
sinking slowly back down into 
student normalcy, or apathy, or 
reality; define it as you will. 

It was hardly Kent State or 
Chicago '68 resurrected, but 
then the subject was hardly the 
Vietnam War. The bone of conten- 
tion, with the student/faculty/ 
citizenry group nipping at one 
end as the Board of Visitors 
held snugly on to it at the other, 
was the fate of Gary Field. The 
administration seemed to be try- 
ing to perform a balancing act 
somewhere in the middle and 
attempting to save face with 
everyone involved. 

To expand or not to expand was 
not the entire question, and that 
was part of the problem. Few 
people argued about renovating 
the crumbling forty-year old 
stadium; Gary had become both a 
health hazard and an eyesore. 
And as SA President Bill Mims 
kept repeating, it was not a 
life-or-death question for the 
football program per se, though 
spectators may not have realized 
that fact from observing either 
the stereotypically-jockish be- 
havior of some of the W&M 
students or the elitist attitudes 
of some of the local intelligent- 
sia. The question was money. 

Unfortunately, such simplistic 
queries often carry portentious 
implications along with them, as 
well as uncomfortable histories. 
This problem had traceable 
roots in the Board of Visitors 
decision in 1974 to support and 
strengthen varsity athletics, 



BELOW: Solemn faces and silly signs 
bear witness to student concern. 



T-£ELV 



RIGHT: SA President Bill Mims and Rev. 
Sam Portaro wait to speak on "Save the 
Charter Day." 



Dan 

OH Mo 




ABOVE: A huge student banner asks the 
big question. 



RIGHT: Philosophy professor Jim Harris 
addresses a rally. 



although a quick flip through 
the Echoes of the previous few years 
revealed a gradual build-up of 
the sports program since 1969- 
1970. The problem preceded the 
installation of Thomas Graves 
as college president; it was old- 
er than the terms of office of 
both Athletic Director Ben Car- 
nevale and Football Goach Jim 
Root. The latter two took over 
after a 1971 shakeup of leader- 
ship following yet another dis- 



mal football season; and the '72 
Echo then concluded, wrongly as 
it turns out, that "the shifting 
meant a de-emphasis of varsity 
sports." A 1977 decision to fight 
to stay in the super-power's 
Division I-A generated the im- 
mediate debate: whether W&M 
needed, wanted, or could afford 
a 30,000 seat stadium. According 
to the Board, Garnevale, Root, 
and others, such growth was ne- 
cessary to attract big-name op- 



72/Academics 





ponents to Williamsburg. Full 
stadiums would mean more gate- 
receipts; more gate-receipts , more 
money; more money, better 
players; better players, 
full stadiums . . . and even- 
tually a financially independent 
football program, or so said 
the Board. Foul! cried the pro- 
testers, it was supposed to be 
self-sustaining now, according to 
the '74 agreement. Foul! replied 
the athletic spokesmen, we ne- 
ver believed the program could 
run on gate-receipts or dona- 
tions alone; big-time collegiate 
football almost never does. And 
as the faculty mulled over their 
low salaries and the appalling 
conditions of some of the class- 
room buildings, the local towns- 
people began to fidget: just 
where were these 30,000 fans 
going to stay, eat, and park their 
approximately 10,000 cars? 
Don't forget Title IX, said the 
voices from the Women's P.E. 
Department in Adair. The laws had 
insisted on financial equality of 
the sexes since 1972; compliance 
could cost the College an addi- 
tional half-million dollars by 
fall. Where to get this extra 
money? Gate-receipts, said the 
Board .... 

So the growing frustration re- 
sulted in a two day public pro- 
test by the campus community, 
casting about a bit wildly for 
some media publicity to help 
their cause. On the eve of the 
February 9 boycott of classes 
orchestrated by the SAC, The 
Washington Post made us famous, 
sort of. A front page (of the 
sports section) article treated 
the smoldering situation ra- 
ther snidely, ridiculing the 
pro-football mill pretentions 
as well as the Southern Ivy-Lea- 
gue airs of both sides. If no- 
thing else, it did scare off 
the one potential donor of re- 
novation funds, Williamsburg 
Pottery founder James P. Maloney, 
who was quoted in the Post as 
having been willing to donate an 
unspecified amount to W&M for 
any purpose — a contradiction of 
facts as printed by the February 
2 Flat Hat. The classroom strike 



proved a popular event, as 75% 
of the students stayed home and 
the great majority of professors 
obligingly postponed tests and 
papers. A small but feisty con- 
tingent of students travelled 
to Richmond to confront Gov. 
Dalton and the General Assembly. 
The Friday afternoon rally at- 
tracted a crowd of about 1800 
to the Alumni House. Over a soft 
chant of "Hell no, we won't 
grow," a woman nervously told 
the crowd that it wasn't the 
Board of Visitors, but the Board 
of the Alumni who were gathered 
inside. Undeterred, the rally 
rolled on, and concluded with a 
rousing chorus of Chris Robin's 
"Ode to Gary Field." The fol- 
lowing day, February 8, marked 
the 286th anniversary of Char- 
ter Day. Traditional ceremonies 
went off without a hitch, al- 
though boycotted by student 
leaders. Instead, the President's 
Aides sponsored an alternative 
ceremony dubbed "Save the Char- 
ter Day." With 600 people in 
attendance, speeches were read, 
the alma mater sung, benedictions 
prayed on blustery PBK Field, 
and participants filed peace- 
fully home. 

On a rainy February 21, with 
over 2000 members of the stu- 
dent body voting, an SAC refe- 
rendum polled 85.43% of that 
number as opposed to the ex- 
pansion of Gary Field. 

On February 22-23, the Board 
of Visitors met at the Alumni 
House. Among other items appro- 
ved for implementation was 
Phase I of the expansion of 
Gary Field. 

As of this writing, Gary Field 
sits wetly in the middle of a 
March rain, as yet unchanged by 
the ferocious verbal debates of 
the last few months. Whether the 
spring, or next fall, or your 
graduation year changes that pic- 
ture remains to be seen. The one 
undeniable conclusion that can 
be made is a conscious echoing of 
an observation in the '75 year- 
book: "Most disconcerting, how 
ever, is that the issue still 



Academics/73 



In Wren the Ink Flows 



One paragraph essays to 
theses, Hterature to 
Hnguistics, Writing 101 to 
Creative Writing and Junior and 
Senior Honors programs colored 
the schedule of courses offered in 
the English Department. While 
headlines proclaimed increases 
in business-oriented curricula 
at college campuses, the W&M 
English major undauntedly pur- 
sued the liberal arts tradition. 
The English student laboring for 
hours over creative writing 
class assignments provided an 
interesting contrast to room- 
mates camped out at the com- 
puter center for social or 
physical science courses; 
similarly, the English student 
remained a curio for tourists 
craning camera-collared necks 



around classroom doorways in 
the historic Wren building. 

Nevertheless, the English 
devotee had met a sort of 
turning point at which society 
seemed to have relegated to 
ivory towers any disciplines 
except those of a business 
nature. And, the English 
major had successfully sup- 
pressed any doubts regarding 
the "practicality" of his major 
and set his sights on that 
dimension offered by a creative 
outlet. Naturally, the English 
101 student cursed his type- 
writer, dreaded all-nighters 
to complete required papers, 
and may have more than once 
counted the days until the 
semester's end at which time 
he might disentangle himself 



from the jungle of phrases and 
punctuation marks. Indeed, 
the Department extracted the 
utmost from its students. 
Historically, in fact, it re- 
quired extensive work and, 
among honors students, only 
sparingly conferred outstanding 
awards. Yet the English major 
continued to distinguish him- 
self simply by authoring works 
with an ease of free-flowing 
thought and articulate com- 
petence to rival error-free 
computer programs or success- 
fully-concluded mathematical 
proofs elsewhere on campus. 
Indeed, English students and 
their high quality department 
combined to polish to a 
brilliance that facet of the 
liberal arts tradition at W&M. 




74/English 




A Cosmopolitan 
View Espoused 



An ability to perceive a 
world-view different than 
that offered from a purely 
American perspective was dem- 
onstrated by the foreign lan- 
guage major. Certainly, intri- 
cate syntax, mind-boggling 
idioms, and challenging pro- 
nunciation and intonation 
discouraged the reluctant 
Spanish 101 enrollee laboring 
to fulfill language requirements. 
Such complexities ren- 
dered language acquisition 
difficult in the typically in- 
tensive W&M classroom setting; 
even more rigorous, however, 
were 101- and 201-"X" classes 




in which work at an accelerated 
rate demanded strenuous effort. 
Similarly, Chinese classes 
offered in conjunction with the 
University of Virginia East 
Asian Language and Area Center 
utilized a self-instructional 
method which paired student 
and tutor and extracted from 
both admirable degrees of 
discipline, patience, and per- 
severance in language study. 
Inevitably, however, a "red- 
letter day" heralded the 
arrival of the language stu- 
dent at a point where he or 
she could "think" in the lan- 
guage. Struggles encountered 
in introductory classes were 
relegated to the past and 
advanced study progressed 
more easily. No longer 
was explicit translation re- 
quired for class communication 
— instead, even exclamations 
were uttered with a prowess 
rivaling native fluency. 
Energies were channeled into 
pursuit of individually-directed 
interests in classic and con- 
temporary literature, civiliza- 
tion, history and culture, and 
advanced composition and con- 
versation. Classes such as 
"Modem French Poetry," 
"Cultural History of Russia," 
and "Spanish Realism and the 
Generation of '98" further 
colored the newly acquired world 
view. Among upperclassmen now 
specializing in their 
majors, the language 
student evinced a distinc- 
tively cosmopolitan outlook. 



UPPER LEFT: Show-and-tell proves 

to be an effective teaching method in the 

difficult French 101- and 102-X classes 

conducted by Monsieur Cloutier. 

LEFT: Tutor Phillip Ch'en and second 

year Chinese student Dave Jones meet each 

week. 



Languages/75 



Profs Preserve the Arts 



The iconography of the 
virtues and vices in 
late medieval art, addressed 
in independent research, and 
an honors thesis discussing 
a 19th century American 
architectural colonial revival 
showed both the kaleidescopic 
interests of Fine Arts concen- 
trators and the liberty allowed 
the major exploring the realm 
of Art History. While a small 
department. Fine Arts was none- 
theless graced with "an outstanding 
faculty," claimed one major, and 
faculty efforts maintained the 
momentum in Fine Arts, which in 
turn preserved the foundation 
of the liberal arts tradition 
at W&M. While another con- 
centrator lamented that "the 
discipline isn't terribly 
practical," the Artist-in- 



Residence, sculptor Robert 
Engman, posited that the 
liberal arts education must 
"provide experiences with all 
the potentials of life that 
can be described" and thus 
enable the student to discover, 
a "sensitivity to response," 
and a creative capacity. 

Indeed, fascinating student 
research interests and studio 
art work emulated tenets es- 
poused in Professor Engman's 
philosophy of art and its place 
in society. As if to mark his 
words, the Fine Arts Society was 
founded this year "to disseminate 
knowledge of the visual arts, to 
promote understanding of the 
humanities, and to encourage 
intellectual and social inter- 
course among members of the 
college community." Hosting 



graphic artist Wayne Enstice 
and "Women Painters of the 
Renaissance," a lecture by 
Eleanor Tufts, the Fine Arts 
Society rapidly assumed an 
integral role in complementing 
curricular activities. 

A farewell was bid to 
Professor Richard K. Newman. 
Endeared to thousands of stu- 
dents who since 1946 made his 
acquaintance in Art History, 
and especially those who were 
thus inspired to concentrate 
in Fine Arts, Dr. Newman 
assumed star-billing in W&M 
annals. Not only was the 
colonial architecture of the 
W&M campus enlivened by his 
references, but the success of 
the Fine Arts Department 
itself reflected his dynamisn. 




ABOVE: Dr. Newman bids farewell after 

over thirty years of teaching. 

LEFT: Dr. Engman talks of art in society. 



76/Fine Arts 



Class IVotesLlve Music 



A senior recital, original 
music composition, or term 
paper culminated the Music 
major's study and often represent- 
ed at least two years of concen- 
trated effort specifically devoted 
to the project. Indeed, Phi 
Beta Kappa Hall set the stage 
for the recitals by Music 
majors, and it was awesome, 
remarked one concentrator, 
to have the stage all to 
yourself. Twice monthly. 




less formal, voluntary student 
recitals also demonstrated 
the accomplishment of music 
students and offered oppor- 
tunities to practice before an 
audience. Classroom activities 
also elicited individual 
student effort. In the 
"History of English Music," 
students sang to illustrate 
research, as did participants in 
"Twentieth Century Music." 
The value of "live music" was 
emphasized by faculty who 
called upon student talent to 
perform, for "Introduction to 
Music History" students, Bee- 
thoven's "Pathetique" piano 
sonata or a Schubert impromptu. 

Students toting listening 
sheets and tape recorders 
occupied all seats in the Music 
library prior to class tests; 
indeed, greatly increased 
student enrollment was accom- 
panied by extensive expansion 
of the Music library and turn- 
table facilities. Enthusiasm 
was as profuse — channelled 
to extracurricular activities 
such as a Barbershop Quartet, 
the new Andrews Sisters, and 
a Jazz Band. Uninhibited talent 
and boundless energy colored 
campus activity. In February, 
Phi Mu Alpha, the men's honor- 
ary music fraternity, sponsored 
an American Composers Recital 
to promote American music; 
Phi Mu Alpha teamed with Delta 
Omicron, the women's music 
fraternity, in "Patience," 
thereby maintaining traditional 
annual student production of a 
Gilbert and Sullivan operetta. 
Thus, within the classroom and 
outside of its confines the 
Music major was assured of an 
opportunity to contribute a 
special talent to campus life. 



TOP LEFT: Schubert & Puccini are 

part of Cathy Sentman's senior recital. 

TOP RIGHT: Dr. Stewart offers theory 

classes. 

LEFT: Band director Mr. Varner takes note. 



Music/77 



"Philosophies 
of ^Attraet Many 



B P hilosophical inquiry finds 
M. its subject matter where- 
ever people are thinking: in 
science, in law, in education, 
in religion" believed the 
Philosophy Department. Indeed, 
its curriculum was tailored 
to the needs of "everyman." 
Courses were designed not only 
to further a concentration 
or to complement interdisciplin- 
ary study but to require the 
student to engage in "the powers 
of precise determination, 
creative imagination, logical 
organization, and evaluative 
judgment." The philosophies 
of law, higher education, 
religion, literature, social 
science, medicine, and health 
care offered a basis for a 
liberal education in such 
disciplines. 

Thus the Department con- 
tinued interdisciplinary 
courses and considered new 
topics, such as the "Philos- 
ophy of Poetry" and the 
"Foundations of Mathematics," 
for 1980 implementation. 
A healthy rapport between 
students and faculty encouraged 
discussion; student input in 
teacher evaluation merited 
special emphasis. Meanwhile, 
faculty members practiced 
their own interdisciplinary 
hobbies. Professor Henry 
McLane, for example, while 
having to relinquish orch- 
estra membership due to time 
constraints, nevertheless 
doubled as the Women's Diving 
coach and accompanied the team 
throughout the United States. 
The Philosophy of Athletics, 
anyone? 



BELOW: Discussion flows between 
Dr. Cobb and Chris Mulligan. 
BELOW LEFT: Musician and athlete, 
Dr. McLane is the liberal arts ideal. 



RIGHT: Dr. Jones offers "Philosophy of 
the Social Sciences." 




78/Philosophy 



BELOW RIGHT: Supervision of a highly suc- 
cessful Asia House program and a variety 
of Asian Religion classes keep Dr. Van 
Horn busy. 




Its Timeliness 
Spurs Inquiry 



i'llu>iTsl4ft '^ 


w\ 


l)Hft^MA «| 


> ^Aftl^^inl 


^' 


J? 


, , <■ ij i 


m-:n 


11^;!^ 


' iL^L^ T - 


L ' 1 


V ^^i^^^B"**^ 




II B 




^^^ 




Various theories of the 
nature and function of 
reUgion, its history and its 
role in contemporary issues 
were addressed by the Religion 
Department. Certainly during 
a year in which the "People's 
Temple" provoked examination of 
a society's religious institu- 
tions and the motivation for its 
members to engage in worship, 
and in which "normalization" 
of relations with the People's 
Republic of China enlarged 
the sphere of cultural under- 
standing, the theoretical 
frameworks and methodologies 
offered in religion classes 
assumed particular timeliness. 

The Departmental format 
catered to the many facets of 
religion study. Both Asian 
and Western religions received 
emphasis. Professor Jack 
Van Horn led classes in South 
Asian religion. Buddhism in 
South Asia, and modern 
Hinduism; early Christianity 
and modem religious thought 
were contrasted and compared 
by Western religion students. 
The "History of Religion in 
America," "Religion in the 
American South," and "American 
Sects and Cults" also furthered 
understanding of institutions 
closer to home. Biblical studies, 
and, of special interest to 
the double major, bioethics and 
ecology and religious ethics 
were offered. Independent study 
and an honors program were 
available to enhance further 
chances for specific inquiry; 
the religion concentrator 
was thus afforded a thorough 
background in his discipline. 



LEFT: Provocative questions are posed by 
Dr. Tiefel in "Death and Dying." 



Religion/79 



We've New Toga-wear 



Raucous toga parties and 
emblazoned Greek letters 
emerged on campuses throughout 
the nation this year. So, too, 
were "Egyptology," "Roman Bri- 
tain," and "Scientific Greek 
and Latin" among course offer- 
ings contemplated by the Classics 
Department in response to in- 
creasing student interest in 
Latin, Greek, and Classical 
Civilization. Professor J. Ward 
Jones dusted off his hieroglyphics 
knowledge in preparation for 
"Egyptology," and plans were 
made with the Biology Depart- 
ment and School of Law to equip 
pre-med and law students with 
a familiar vocabulary. To meet 
growing demand for training in 
the classics, a staff addition 
was also contemplated. 

Teaching jobs in classical 
studies were becoming easier 
to find, noted Department 
Chairman Lewis Leadbeater. 
Graduates were typically 
welcomed by the best graduate 
schools or assumed secondary 
school teaching jobs. "-Bo, 
-bis, -bit, -bimus, -bitus, 
-bunt" and "is, ea, id" also 
offered the Latin major a 
particular ability to compre- 
hend the intricacies of his 
own English language, while 
Classical Civilization con- 
centrators received an in- 
timate knowledge of ancient 
history, cities, the dramatic 
arts, literature, and 
philosophy. 

The Department enjoyed a 
congenial atmosphere in which 
faculty enthusiasm mirrored 
student interest. Popular 
part-time Latin, Greek, and 
Classical Civilization professor 
and Undergraduate Dean Linda 
Collins Reilly contributed 
"Nothing New Under the Sun" 
to the Last Lecture 
Series. Indeed, "Latin was 
not dead" — neither across 
the nation nor at W&M. 




80/Classical Studies 




Theatre Sets 
Stage for Fifty 



m^ ifty Years of William & 
JL Mary Theatre," a 480-page, 
hardback volume edited by Pro- 
fessor Howard M. Scammon, was 
published this year, narrating 
the story of College productions 
dating back to 1926. Continuing 
to render the theatre one of the 
most outstanding, well-attended 
campus events were the efforts 
of Theatre concentrators, 
talented non-majors, Williams- 



BELOW: At Coach Pike's urging, public 
speakers enunciate and project during 
workshop sessions in Theatre and Speech. 




burg community members, and a 
dynamic faculty. Indeed, the 
Theatre Department sought to 
elicit from its students "the 
requirements demanded by the 
art — self-discipline, coopera- 
tion, dedication, desire for 
constant improvement toward 
excellence, and curiosity." 
Thus, in all of the myriad 
facets of the stage, from 
play writing, costuming, lighting, 
sound, properties, stage rigging 
and scene design, construction, 
and painting, to direction 
and theatre administration. 
Theatre students displayed a 
degree of creativity and 
perseverance beyond that 
demanded by the typical 
academic program and consis- 
tently produced excellent 
drama for the College and 
community. 

Theatre and Speech faculty 
sought maintenance of an 
informal, friendly relation- 
ship between professors and stu- 
dents. Introductory class 
sizes were limited; many 
upper-level courses enjoyed 
enrollment small enough to 
afford students individualized 
instruction. 

Meanwhile, the Theatre 
Department continued to amass 
new talent. Women became more 
involved in technical produc- 
tion, and lighting and construc- 
tion received new treatment at 
the hands of female innovators. 
The integration of Physical 
Education Department dance 
classes with the Theatre Depart- 
ment also enlarged the scope 
of already widely-dimensioned 
theatre capabilities. An 
energetic department thus 
prepared to enter the footlights 
for another fifty-year run in 
support of dramatic arts. 



Theatre/Speech/81 



Take a Glance 
Now and Then 



Ethnohistorian Dr. James L. 
Axtell's talk on "The 
Unkindest Cut of All — or 
Who Invented Scalping," and "The 
Venezuelan Watergate — The 
Trial of President Marcos Perez 
Jiminez, 1959-1968" by Dr. Judith 
Ewell were among faculty lec- 
tures sponsored by the History 
Students' Organization this year. 
After announcement of "normalized 
relations" between the U.S. and 
China, Professor of East Asian 
History and Chinese language 
course supervisor, Dr. Craig 
Canning, was barraged with 
questions on policy implications. 
In an Asia House presentation 
and a William and Mary News 
interview, Dr. Canning asserted 
that direct contact with the 



Chinese was indeed "in the best 
interests of the United States." 

A dynamic History Department 
faculty thus continued its trad- 
itionally strong program. Stu- 
dents were quick to mirror 
faculty activity. English cof- 
feehouses of the 17th century, 
Porfirio Dias, Rhode Island 
colonial churches, and women's 
occupations in 18th century 
Southern colonies were among 
research theses presented by 
students at a campus regional 
meeting of the Phi Alpha Theta 
international history honor 
society. Thus the History De- 
partment entered the new decade 
prepared to comment on con- 
temporary developments and re- 
flect interestingly on the past. 



BELOW: A spring History conference 
was chaired by Dr. Walker. 



RIGHT: The umbrella is part of Williams- 
burg History, asserts Dr. McCord. 




82/History 




Is It Worth It? 



Latin honors awarded to stu- 
dents according to grade 
point averages was a tradition 
maintained at many colleges dur- 
ing the decar'e of the seventies. 
While "grade inflation" may have 
mocked such plaudits elsewhere, 
some members of the W&M com- 
munity who cited a particular 
lack of grade inflation on campus 
emphasized the viability of 
honors recognition here. 

Latin laudation, at W&M, 
continued to be conferred only 
upon successful honors program 
students. It was these students 
who indeed showed the "intellec- 



ABOVE LEFT: Both Bob Rothacker and Mr. 
Harris examine distribution and justice. 
BELOW LEFT: American Intellectual His- 
tory is probed in Janet Steele's alcove. 
BELOW raCHT: Passage to India con- 
fronts Judy Starr. 




tual stimulation" worthy of such 
praise in the truest sense of 
its liberal arts tradition. 
Honors preparation typically 
began in the fall. Exhaustive 
work — reading "intellectual- 
ly," preparing to refute or 
defend all points, and self- 
interpreting — prefaced 
original thesis presentation. 
Spring oral examinations demanded 
expert defense of written work 
and related research by the stu- 
dent before a committee of at 
least three faculty members. 
Finally, at graduation, a tiny 
asterisk in the program and a 
voluminous bound treatise in 
the college archives symbolized 
many a sleepless night, a frustra- 
ted barrelfuU of sentences 
begun and deleted, and inevit- 
able moments of self-questionning. 
Thus, the development of Colo- 
nial Revival Architecture in 
19th-century America, "Southern 
Agrarians and the Catholic Worker 
Movement," the desirable scope of 
redistribution as part of the 
provision of justice, and a 
central paradox in E.M. Forster's 
Passage to India were addressed 
by 1979 honors students. 
Colonial Williamsburg offer- 
ed documentation; The Catholic 
Worker newspaper was on micro- 
film in Swem Library; Morton 
Hall hideouts were a respite 
for philosophizing; and a 
chance during the Cambridge 
Program to study original notes 
at Forster's King's College 
spurred research activity. 
Note cards, file boxes, and 
legal pads hinted at organiza- 
tion. Access to faculty 
sponsors was sometimes difficult; 
a full schedule of diverse 
interests in extracurricular 
activities seemed to characterize 
both student and sponsor. 
Nevertheless, by spring, 
the honors student had actively 
prticipated in and originally 
contributed to the realm of 
liberal arts. May the rewards 
of such inquiry be many. 



Honors Feature/83 



Eeons Go Bananas 




FERDINAND 



. 1978 United Feature Syndicate, Inc. 



Alfred Kahn, newly appoint- 
ed Presidential counsel on 
wage and price stability, sug- 
gested this year that "bananas" 
be on the tip of everyone's 
tongue rather than that morose 
word, "inflation." Indeed, both 
international and domestic af- 
fairs wrought havoc with the 
dollar and Carter sought in Kahn 
the aptitude to straighten out 
a disarrayed economy. 

There was yet more hope, how- 
ever. In the Economics Depart- 
ment at W&M, ever-increasing 
class enrollments presaged a new 
generation of economists. The 
macroeconomics of inflation and 
unemployment, the economic inter- 
dependence of international 
energy policies, and the in- 
trinsic laws of demand and 
supply which scissored both 
domestic and foreign macro 
structures into consumer and 
producer building blocks were 
introduced, scrutinized, and 
dissected in Department courses. 
Models of the way the economy 
works given microeconomic dim- 
ensions were outlined in 
"Macroeconomic Adjustments" 
with Dr. Robert Archibald; 
Dr. Carl Moody's "Econometrics" 
offered laboratory apparatus to 
test such models empirically 
(as well as to illustrate the 
frustration of regression 
depression!). And addressing 
the desirable scope of 
government as fundamental to 
any policy prescriptions 



harbored by models and their 
empirical results was 
Mr. Harris's "Welfare Economics 
and Political Economy." 

Indeed, it was evident as the 
U.S. approached a new decade 
that economic issues merited 
priority resolution. The 
student needn't glance at news- 
paper headlines to note food 
price rises unmatched by a 
less-than minimum wage campus 
job. Thus, the economics es- 
poused by an extremely viable 
Department warranted interest; 
perhaps the investment of its 
faculty into student training 
would pay off in the near 
future as graduates concocted 
banana splits in the kitchens 
of real world leaders. 




84/Economics 






M^y^ 




The Grassroots 
Look Intrigues 



Phone calls and door-to- 
door canvassing by govern- 
ment students surveyed the atti- 
tudes of Hampton and Newport 
News residents towards a con- 
solidation issue. Local pre- 
election interviews before the 
gubernatorial race also were con- 
ducted by students and gave them 
a firsthand opportunity to ex- 
plore grassroots politics. A 
variety of upper-level seminars 
assumed discussion formats and 
provided an outlet to sound off 
on political issues. Thus the 
Government Department maintained 
a momentum compatible with the 
real world. 

Welcomed to the Department 
this year was Mr. David Gordon, 
who led intro. classes and a 
topics course, "Politics in 
Tropical Africa." Mr. Gordon's 
special interests complemented 



a well-rounded curriculum add- 
ressing core areas of inter- 
national politics, comparative 
government, American government, 
and political philosophy. 

Outside the classroom, the 
Government Club and Pi Sigma 
Alpha, the government honor soci- 
ety, hosted faculty at a wine 
and cheese party and teamed to 
wrap up the gubernatorial 
election at a get-together with 
faculty offering election 
return analyses. 

As 1980 approached, political 
bandwagons formed for another 
American presidential election. 
Maybe not this time, but perhaps 
in future decades, a candidate 
will boast W&M credentials. 
Until then, the Government Depart- 
ment cultivated analytical ability 
among its students to monitor 
the political scene adroitly. 



TOP LEFT: A. Abramowitz is a gov't 
whiz. FAR LEFT: Dr. Barry seeks infla- 
tion cures. LEFT: Students philoso- 
phize with Mr. Smith. 



BELOW: International relations, U.S. 
foreign policy, and British government are 
Mr. Ward's specialities. 




Government/85 



Kids' Day Care 



Boasting a newly imple- 
mented Master of Arts de- 
gree program, planning a doctoral 
curriculum for 1984 inaugura- 
tion, and contemplating an in- 
crease in the number of hours re- 
quired for undergraduate con- 
centration, an already rigorous 
and thorough Psychology Depart- 
ment offered an even better 
preparation for the major. 

Research emphasis was especial- 
ly evidenced this year. Labora- 
tory skills and data methods were 
introduced early in the psychol- 
ogy major's program. By invita- 
tion, the capable sophomore stu- 
dent engaged in a limited enroll- 
ment research seminar, statist- 
ics, experimental design, devel- 
opmental psychology and personal- 
ity research, and computer ap- 
plications in psychology offered 
opportunity for further inde- 
pendent study. Advanced students 
also participated in an empir- 
ically oriented, individually 
supervised senior research sem- 
inar, an honors program, and 
"Directed Readings," in which 
the major addressed special 



topics under a professor's tutelage. 

According to Department Chair- 
man Eugene Harcum, new directions 
in addition to graduate and re- 
search programs were considered 
this year. Applications of the 
discipline to clinical psycho- 
logy were the focus. The pro- 
vision of mental health services 
in the community, day care for 
exceptional children, and work 
at Eastern State Hospital re- 
ceived particular emphasis. 

In conclusion, Professor Harcum 
described a two-fold purpose in 
the Department — to offer specific 
training in the major field, and 
to educate students in the 
liberal arts to enable them "to 
assume a place in society." 



RIGHT: Professor Harcum practices what 

his plaque preaches. 

BELOW RIGHT: Dr. Fischer's classes 

offer statistical methods fundamental 

to empirical research and quantitative 

analyses in psychology. 

BELOW LEFT: "Perspectives on Social 

Behavior" examines "affiliation and 

friendship formation" under the guidance 

of amiable Dr. Nezlek. 





86/Psychology 




Papers Win 



Fieldwork at the Colonial 
Counselling Center in- 
spired one student to change her 
planned concentration from urban 
planning to social work. Indeed, 
the Sociology Department em- 
phasized application of and di- 
rect experience with the the- 
oretical constructs and method- 
ologies of the discipline. 
Eastern State Hospital was a 
further focus for research in 
the sociology of mental illness; 
the Virginia Institute of Mar- 
ine Science offered study in 
maritime sociology. 

Independent research, reading, 
honors study, and seminar-for- 
matted "Special Problems in 
Sociology" maintained opportun- 
ities for individual pursuit of 
interests by both faculty and 
students. Furthermore, the 
Alpha Kappa Delta honor society 
sponsored a research symposium 



BELOW RIGHT: Dr. Kreps uses tenets of 
his "Complex Organizations" class to 
decipher student papers. 
BELOW LEFT: Students, too, are wide- 
eyed in Dr. Aday's "Criminology" course. 



at Virginia Commonwealth Uni- 
versity. Three student papers 
selected during a W&M contest 
were accepted at the symposium 
for February reading and pos- 
sible publication in the AKD 
journal. 

Meanwhile a Sociology Club 
T-shirt logo contest and a 
faculty/student reception in 
the Sit 'n Bull room further 
promoted departmental rapport. 
The Club also hosted Dr. Ruth 
Jacobs, from Boston University, 
who lectured on career plan- 
ning in the sociology field. 
Indeed, the focus on career 
planning complemented the prac- 
tical orientation assumed in 
Department course offerings. 
Undergraduates enjoyed a range of 
options. While about thirty per- 
cent pursued graduate study in 
highly-rated programs at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill and at the University 
of Wisconsin, for example, many 
opted for job market opportun- 
ities in mental health fields, 
thereby evincing the success of 
the Department. 




Sociology/87 



Potato Names 



Archaeology, women's occu- 
pations, and gravestones in 
a New Jersey county were among 
research topics senior concen- 
trators chose to fulfill as an 
Anthropology Department thesis 
requirement. Indeed, the De- 
partment library boasted a va- 
riety of theses volumes — many of 
which, according to one professor, 
were certainly indicative of 
graduate-level capabilities. 
Maintenance of the senior re- 
search project requirement thus 
assured the anthropology major 
of an opportunity to engage in 
in-depth individual study, de- 
spite increasing enrollments in 
less-easily personalized intro- 
ductory classes. 

Students further shared in re- 
search endeavors initiated by 
ever-active Anthropology profes- 
sors. Returning from a year of 
study in the Andes, Dr. Stephen 
Brush engaged student assistance 
in organization and interpre- 
tation of an array of cultural 
ecological data concerning the 



folk taxonomy of potatoes. Dr. 
Mario Zamora encouraged student 
input in production of and con- 
tributions to the inaugural issue 
of The Association of Third World 
Anthropologists (ATWA) Research 
Bulletin. Student collaboration 
and recognition in research ef- 
forts were of utmost importance 
in Departmental activities, em- 
phasized Dr. Zamora. 

A particular relevance of the 
discipline to contemporary so- 
ciety was reiterated for anthro- 
pology students in a new course, 
"Anthropology in Business, Public 
Administration, and Communica- 
tion." The seminar addressed 
anthropological methods and theo- 
retical concepts in the context 
of institutions such as multi- 
national corporations, third 
world bureaucracies, and the 
media. Thus the Anthropology 
Department evinced much research 
activity and concomitantly fos- 
tered independent thought and a 
contemporary outlook among its 
students. 





1 












^H^HI^^^H 









ABOVE: Dr. Brush has fascinating tales 
to tell of his Andes exploits. 
LEFT: Dr. Noisin serves on the 
editorial staff of the new ATWA Bulletin. 



88/ Anthropology 




Many Facets 
ofaFetRocfc 



z 



ook's Pit, E.B. William's 
quarry, and a variety of 
other field trips taken by geo- 
logy students to nearby locales 
were highlights of the Geology 
Department program. Such trips, 
as well as laboratory follow- 
ups to classroom instruction, 
offered even the beginning stu- 
dent an opportunity to experi- 
ence the research orientation 
of his discipline. Indepen- 
dent research and an honors 
program for seniors and special 
topics courses addressing geo- 
chemistry, geophysics, hydro- 
logy, or advanced study in 
other areas furthered student 
interests. 

Basement equipment in Small 
Hall was introduced in many 
classes; diamond-saw cuts 
miraculously revealed the 
facets of quartz crystals in- 



TOP LEFT: Dr. Clement has a keen eye. 
LEFT; Dr. Goodwin maintains order. 
BELOW: Dr. Johnson's a familiar bicyclist. 



side geodes, for example, and 
the use of the polarizing 
microscope was undertaken in 
Dr. Stephen Clement's petro- 
graphy class. Research work 
and brief paper presentations 
in classes such as environ- 
mental geology, marine geo- 
logy, and economic geology 
further supported the high-quality 
program offered. 

Geology majors chose grad- 
uate school or job market 
opportunities. One recent 
concentrator successfully 
impressed real estate clients by 
using his geology background; 
another graduate assumed a 
position with an oil company. 
Several double majors comple- 
mented physical science or 
social science study such as 
anthropology and history with 
geology for broadened access to the 
job market. An array of 
student pursuits thus found 
support in the Geology Depart- 
ment. 




Geology/89 



Do-Loop Blues 



Just after Halloween, a large 
bag of goodies appeared on 
a crowded table in the computer 
center workroom in the basement 
of Jones Hall. A benevolent soul 
had donated her treats to the 
"all hours of the night and day" 
entranced computer science stu- 
dents. Certainly the tempera- 
mental terminals, keypunch wait- 
ing lines, and remote-printer 
backlogs were not conducive to 
warm feelings for fellow stu- 
dents. But candy indeed sweet- 
ened trouble-shooting discus- 
sions in the workroom and 
contributed to a camaraderie, 
rendering the dimly lit halls, 
incessant machine noise, and 
clammy climate of Jones' base- 
ment habitable. 

Among the Introductory, CS 141 
rookies caught in infinite do- 
loops, the one or two-fingered 
klutzes vainly punching twenty- 
digit statistics, econometrics 
and psychology students analyzing 
social science, and chemistry 
and biology researchers gaining 
insight into physical phenomena, 
were serious mathematics/ 
computer science majors pursuing 
class projects and research in- 
terests. Even among the con- 



centrators, however, diversity 
abounded. In the past year, a 
music maestro was awarded "High 
est Honors" for a successfully 
constructed program generating 
music within constraints of cer- 
tain music theory rules. Another 
artist challenged Renaissance 
scientific ideals as he developed 
kaleidoscopic graphics programs 
in two and three-dimensions. 
Most recently, a concentrator 
admirably assumed a Sherlock 
Holmesian pursuit of the opti- 
mally efficient algorithm for 
the merging of alphabetized lists, 
and engaged as clues a mind- 
boggling array of mathematical 
theorems. 

Meanwhile, new mathematics 
classes investigating com- 
puter applicability — "Linear 
Network Analysis" and "Numer- 
ical Linear Algebra," in par- 
ticular — effectively comple- 
mented the Departmental di- 
chotomy of math/computer science, 
Thus, given the physical and 
social science use of the facil- 
ities, maintenance of individual 
student interests in a liberal 
arts tradition, even in the con- 
text of a burgeoning computer 
age, was competently ensured. 




ABOVE: Alumnus Dr. Prosl has an office 
now rather than a dorm room. 



RIGHT: Easter egg design is a side- 
line for Professor Reynolds. 




90/Math/Computer Science 




Reaetlonis Rale 
Real Reiseareh 



Opportunities for exploration 
beyond textbook confines 
were an integral aspect of Depart- 
ment of Chemistry course offerings. 
Upperclassmen were encouraged to 
engage in long-term research in 
conjunction with a professor. 
Thus, the chemistry student 
encountered a turning point from 
classroom study to individual 
pursuit of his discipline. And, 
such experience rendered the 
Chemistry concentrator better 
able to choose among the many 
options available upon graduation 
— private industry or govern- 
mental employment, teaching, 
research, medicine or other life 
science careers, and graduate 
school. 

Of particular interest to 
student researchers this year 
were computer analyses of 
physical organic chemical 
data measuring the reaction 
rates of very large molecules. 
Meanwhile, some students util- 
ized a special option — Bio- 



chemistry study offered with the 
Eastern Virginia Medical School. 
Finally, upperclassmen worked 
as laboratory assistants for 
undergraduate courses. 

In addition, the current 
'lature of ongoing research 
was discussed on campus by 
Chemistry Club speakers from 
industry and from other 
universities. International 
visiting professors included 
Dr. Dionis E. Sunko, from 
Yugoslavia, and Dr. Malcolm 
D. Ingram from Aberdeen, 
Scotland. 

The individual atten- 
tion afforded both upper-level 
students and Department-wide 
research interests, according 
to a Chemistry major, fostered 
a community spirit regarding 
the discipline — a spirit 
conducive to the advancement 
of chemistry in the truest 
sense of the liberal arts 
tradition. 



" 



TOP: Teaming up for molecular research 

are Dotty Jung and Dr. Schiavelli. 

ABOVE: Dr. Thompson enthralls Chem 

majors. 

RIGHT: Computer print-outs diagnose 

all sorts of math and chemistry problems. 




Chemistry/91 



At Work on the Front 



••I t is only through being 
M actively involved in re- 
search that a student can appre- 
ciate the nature of the disci- 
pline," noted the Physics 
Department. Special topics 
offered as freshmen coUoquia 
initiated research interests 
even at the introductory level. 
Research "at the frontiers of 
physics" had long been a 
Departmental requirement for 
senior physics concentrators. 
Both bibliographic and experi- 
mental research characterized 
independent study; small upper- 
level classes were receptive 
to particular student queries 
and interests and provided 
background for research en- 
deavors. Extensive facilities 
used by graduate and under- 
graduates also indicated 
a congenial research atmo- 
sphere. Honors were awarded 
to successful projects. 

Indeed, course offerings 
were designed to introduce 
a variety of theoretical 
constructs, methodologies, 
and applications of physics. 
The physics of music, astro- 
nomy, experimental atomic 
physics, electronics, energy, 
and environmental physics were 
among classes available. 

The physics concentrator 
contemplated engineering 
school or physics graduate 
study. Department Chairman 
Harlan E. Schone estimated 
that about a third of physics 
majors entered graduate pro- 
grams in the discipline, a 
third chose engineering 
school, and a third assumed 
engineering jobs after 
graduation. A variety of 
other fields, however, 
welcomed the physics con- 
centrator — the major as 
a "scientific generalist" 
is valuable to biology, 
mathematics, medicine, 
environmental science, 
operations research, and 



industrial management, 
commented the Department. 
Thus, the Physics concentrator 
enjoyed several options upon 
completion of an excellent 
W&M program. 




ABOVE: Dr. Schone chairs a successful 
Physics Department. 
BELOW: Dr. Champion is just that— 
a champ — in operating myriad tools. 




92/Physics 



BELOW: Tissue culture cells are the 
subject of research by Dr. Wiseman 
and honors students Ginny Bumgardner 
and Dave Fisher. 




Frldayk Lunch 
Bears Fruit 



••H_H untington's Disease" has 

ii eluded the diagnostic 
capability of physicians for 
years. The symptoms of the dis- 
ease often fail to appear until 
middle age. Therefore, those 




ABOVE: Dr. Mangum upholds women's 
lib in the Biology Department. 
BELOW: Dr. Mathes is always recep- 
tive to student queries. 




with the disease may unknowingly 
intergenerationally transmit it. 
However, working with Dr. Law- 
rence Wiseman this year, biology 
honors student Ginny Bumgardner 
examined the cellular adhesive 
properties of human fibroblast 
cells in an attempt to pinpoint 
surface characteristics of 
Huntington's mysterious ill- 
ness. 

Indeed, the Biology Depart- 
ment offered both facilities 
and encouragement to students 
pursuing independent research. 
Intradepartmental cooperation 
assumed particular importance, 
noted Ginny, to the extent that 
equipment and know-how were 
willingly shared. Friday 
lunch hours were devoted to 
seminars during which faculty 
presented research addressing 
topics such as endocrinology 
or cell biology. Further, 
undergraduates who petitioned 
administration and faculty were 
welcomed in graduate-level 
courses, where an emphasis was 
placed on ongoing research and 
journal publication rather than 
textbook basics. This offered 
the serious student an oppor- 
tunity to experience a vital 
aspect of the discipline. 

Individual attention thus 
was shown to the capable 
biology concentrator despite 
a growing departmental enroll- 
ment. The biology honor 
society. Phi Sigma, elected 
to membership distinguished 
concentrators. Also, success- 
ful honors students were given 
a chance to publish their 
research results. Most impor- 
tantly, the research efforts 
of students often furthered 
study undertaken by faculty, 
and the reciprocity of faculty 
and student interests contrib- 
uted to the success of 
departmental activities. 



Biology/93 



Tire Brings; 
Big Blaze 



T 



itle IX" gave added impetus ball often emerged disappointed 
to women contemplating a from registration. Nevertheless, 

the PE Department established a 
commendably diverse array of en- 
ticing course offerings such that 
even a second choice class proved 
to be an enjoyable respite from 
academics. 



physical education concentration. 
The relatively small majors pro- 
gram welcomed an almost fifty 
percent increase in female en- 
rollment this year, and the 
Physical Education Department 
staff predicted ever-increasing 
numbers of women — partly attrib- 
utable to response to expanded 
facilities now more on par with 
those enjoyed by men's athletics. 
Commented Professor Millie West 
on the new trend, "The fire set 
in the 70's will bring about a 
bigger blaze in the 80's." 

Although no Departmental mer- 
ger was anticipated, tradition- 
ally separate men's and women's 
programs were redesigned to af- 
ford co-educational participa- 
tion in most academic and ac- 
tivity courses. Meanwhile, the 
"Battle of the Sexes" continued. 
Senior women in particular re- 
membered their solo appearances 
in fencing or basketball. Re- 
counted one female student, 
"The professor made me try an 
extra foul shot — if I didn't 
make it, the class was to run 
laps." Did she make the shot? 
Of course — and she became a 
heroine on campus as a result. 
There was also the story of the 
female canoeist whose male part- 
ner disembarked during class 
one day and then shoved their 
craft out into windy waters. 
Did she competently assume solo 
control? Certainly — and later 
"he" got an unexpected chance 
to cool off in Lake Matoaka. 

Accompanying reorganization 
were expanding class sizes in 
some instances — "Emergency Med 
ical Services," for example, was 
attended by some one hundred 
students — and the popularity of 
backpacking and canoeing surged 
noticeably. Students closed out 
of tennis, handball, and voUey- 




94/P.E. 




R.O.T.C. Rigop 



An incredible variety of 
activities required of ca- 
dets rendered ROTC a particular 
challenge when combined with 
W&M academic rigors and alter- 
native extracurricular affairs 
across campus. In lower-level 
military science classes the ca- 
det encountered theories of Amer- 
ican national security policy, 
revolutionary warfare, and man- 
agement and leadership. 

Concurrently, the new ROTC 
student developed general phys- 
ical fitness and, specifically. 



ABOVE: Careful planning is requi- 
site to fit ROTC into a W&M schedule, and 
Capt. Pratt is always available for infor- 
mal contact and thoughtful advice. 
LEFT: Major Young demonstrates the 
polish any cadet seeks. 



orienteering skills, marksmanship 
aptitude, basic dismounted drill 
ability, survival techniques, and 
military first aid competency. 
The advanced cadet addressed fur- 
ther such classroom topics as 
legal and political civil/mili- 
tary relations. Afternoons 
spent in military science indeed 
challenged the W&M cadet whose 
morning hours were similarly oc- 
cupied by that institution's 
academic demands. 

Opportunities nevertheless 
abounded for recognition of in- 
dividual excellence in the Depart- 
ment of Military Science. Reg- 
ular Army commissions were a- 
warded to outstanding seniors and, 
for many, culminated four years 
of competitive study. High grade 
point averages, notable summer 
camp or airborne school perform- 
ance, and other distinguished 
work were recognized at informal 
fall and formal spring ceremon- 
ies. The Society of the Scab- 
bard and Blade elected to mem- 
bership about twenty percent of 
the junior class on the basis of 
service, leadership, and scholar- 
ship. Finally, the Rangers Club, 
active in physical fitness, and 
the Queen's Guard, unique to W&M, 
offered voluntary opportunity 
for individual participation in 
the ROTC program. 

Meanwhile, underclassmen were 
sought out by junior and senior 
leaders in a special effort this 
year to increase such contact. 
A cadet lounge arranged in a 
vacated Blow Gym classroom housed 
a stereo, television, games, and 
a study area for ROTC evening 
recreation and "happy hours." 
In addition, establishment of a 
redesigned promotion system was 
undertaken to further reinforce 
freshmen and sophomore interests. 
Thus the approximately two hun- 
dred or so ROTC students in the 
joint W&M/Christopher Newport 
College program attained par- 
ticular competency and well- 
earned distinction. 



ROTC/95 



A Bicentennial Party 



^^11 appy 200th Birthday" was 

i JL wished this year to the 
Marshall-Wythe School of Law. 
Indeed, law study at W&M has 
long been a respected tradition. 
George Wythe was the first Pro- 
fessor of Law and Police in 
1779; his students included 
John Marshall, Thomas Jefferson, 
James Monroe and Henry Clay. 
Wythe himself assisted his coun- 
try in its struggle for inde- 
pendence by signing the Dec- 
laration of Independence and 
contributed to the study of 
law by being among the first to 
formulate the theory of judi- 
cial review in the United States. 

Upon entering its third cen- 
tury, Marshall-Wythe extended 
its legal perspective by reach- 
ing beyond classroom confines 
to Williamsburg area residents 
and to the W&M campus. The 
Legal Aid Center opened nearby 
on Richmond Road; under the 
supervision of Associate 
Professor of Law and Clinical 
Education John M. Levy, law 
students staffing the center 
interpreted for the layman the 
mind-boggling intricacies of 
legislative domain. The Legal 
Aid Center thus marked a turn- 
ing point in the availability 
of legal advice to the com- 
munity. 

Meanwhile, the student staff 
at the Center embarked upon a 
turning point of their own. 
While they received pass-fail 
credit for their work, perhaps 
most importantly the Center 
offered them an opportunity to 
apply classroom training. 
Similarly, in other capacities 
the Marshall-Wythe law student 
met that point at which his or 
her professional potential was 
realized. Students excelling 



in scholarship and leadership 
were recognized by an invita- 
tion to join the St. George 
Tucker Society of select stu- 
dents, faculty, and alumni of 
the Law School. Recognition 
was also attained by students 
who, on the basis of academic 
standing, served on the staff 
of the quarterly William and Mary 
Law Review. Finally, the ulti- 
mate achievement by students in 
attaining success as lawyers 
was attested to by Associate 
Dean Timothy Sullivan. 
"Last year," he noted, "93% 
of the graduating class was 
working in law-related jobs 
within six months of gradua- 
tion." Marshall-Wythe indeed 
had much to be proud of during 
its bicentennial celebration. 



TOP: Law student Bob Wooldridge gets 
comfortable at the Legal Aid Center. 
BOTTOM: The Moot Courtroom provides a 
real-life setting for the first-year law 
class. 




96/Law 




It Suits a Lot 



Especially noteworthy this 
year were changes that the 
School of Business Administration 
has been undergoing since its 
founding in 1919. The increasing 
viability of a business degree in 
the job market has encouraged 
burgeoning enrollments such that 
this year's 650 graduate and 
undergraduate students comprised 
11% of the total enrollment 
at W&M. That the business world 
is also becoming attractive to 
women was reflected in the 
assumption of four out of every 
ten seats in the School of 
Business by female students. 
Karen Emden, Associate Professor 
of Business, and Associate 
Professor of Accounting Jean 
Hatcher further evinced the 
success of the businesswoman. 
Crowded classes presented a 
source of concern for the Bus- 
iness School, however. Dean 
Charles Quittmeyer expressed 
dismay that the entire school 
was contained on one floor of 
Jones Hall. In the future, 
Dean Quittmeyer hoped to split 
the school into smaller depart- 
ments to include a department 
of accounting, quantitative 
statistics, finance, behavioral 
science, production and indus- 
trial management. 




An invaluable facet of the 
school and its students was 
maintenance of connections 
with the "outside" business 
world. Advising and supporting 
the school was the Sponsors 
Board, Inc., formed in 1970 and 
consisting of twenty-one nation- 
wide corporate executives. 
Publication continued of the 
Virginia Business Report, a 
monthly evaluation of economic 
activity in the state compiled 
by the Bureau of Business 
Research of the school and 
directed by Professor Leland 
Traywick. The report has served 
two to three-thousand persons 
since 1957 and is one of the 
best-known economic reports in 
Virginia. Several professors 
also served as consultants for 
large corporations and were thus 
able to impart connotations of 
"real world" practice to their 
students. 

Opportunity for individual 
excellence in the Business 
School was not dissipated by its 
increasing size. Rather, the 
student was still expected to 
participate orally in class and 
to meet competition fostered 
by the variety of talents of his 
peers. Three sub-programs, in 
management and in accounting, 
with or without a Certified 
Public Accountant option, 
channeled student interests into 
appropriate fields of expertise. 
Reflected in the array of campus 
business recruiters attracted to 
W&M and in the continued success 
of CPA candidates on the tedious 
spring examination was continued 
creditable performance of stu- 
dents in the Department, despite 
its rapid growth. 



TOP: Professor Karen Emden heads "B-Law" 

classes this year. 

MIDDLE: Business major Andy Morse 

secretly debugs a computer dating service 

program. 

BOTTOM: Rapt attention in Professor 

Quinn's class cultivates accounting success. 



Business/97 



An Apple for Teacher 



1^^ ixth period in high school 
^^-^ was always the time of day 
when studies were only of 
remote concern for the student. 
Rather, daydreams of afternoon 
extracurricular activities or 
the evening football game, or 
simply an end-of-day, relaxed 
nonchalance shortened afternoon 
academic attention spans. To 
W&M student teachers at work in 
local schools, sixth period 
offered an opportunity to test 
teaching skills acquired in 
education classes and, in 
addition, to realize personal 
limits of patience and tolerance. 

Indeed, the student teaching 
experience represented a turning 
point from "coached," video- 
taped practice teaching in Jones 
Hall to the real world "playing 
field." Certainly, student 
teachers were carefully prompted 
prior to their on-the-job expe- 
rience. Hints to attain effec- 
tive but subtle discipline, for 
example, included techniques 
such as a lengthy stare by the 
student teacher at the unruly 
culprit, a brief stand by his 
or her desk while the student 
teacher lectured uninterruptedly, 
or the assumption by the student 
teacher of an arms-crossed 
stance to remind students gently 
of authority. For 5'3" student 
teacher Jackie Giorgi, an often- 
invoked technique was that sug- 
gested by Professor Mark 
Gulesian — Jackie requested her 
eleventh-graders please to be 
seated prior to a reprimand, 
that she might "tower" over 
them. 

However, the successful 
student teacher depended not 
only on kinesics but also on a 
natural competence and individual 
initiative. While roommates 
were pulling all-nighters for 
W&M exams, so, too, was the 
student teacher awake until morn- 
ing hours designing social 
studies, math, or English units 
and constructing lesson plans 
incorporating clear directions. 



consistent methods, and fair 
evaluations of student efforts. 
From being a student to teach- 
ing others was the turning point 
with which majors in the School 
of Education were confronted. 




ABOVE: Student teaching is an unfor- 
gettable experience for Patty Lambert. 
RIGHT: Professor Roger Ries shares 
tricks-of-the-trade with his educati 



98/Education 



BELOW: Fifth graders at Waller Mill 
Elementary School are captivated by 
student teacher Vickey Garner, 




Make^ui^Own 

Offered 



Interdisciplinary majors 
undertook a challenge in 
daring to "stray from the beaten 
path" in their courses of 
studies at W&M. Asian studies, 
Russian studies, the environ- 
ment, the American Indian, and 
international relations were 
among the topics of self-con- 
cocted programs. To have given 
such serious thought to the kinds 
of courses desired and to have 
planned each aspect of the pro- 
gram was an admirable endeavor 
on the part of the interdis- 
ciplinary major. By the grape- 
vine, the attractiveness of the 




ABOVE: Dr. Robert Archibald's knack for 
clear thinking ensures interdisciplinary 
majors of well-designed programs. 



BELOW: Committee Chairman Jim Thompson 
is renowned for interests as varied as the 
interdisciplinary curricula he supervises. 




multi-faceted study increased 
such that greater interest 
was demonstrated this year than 
previously indicated in 
the six years of the program. 
Students realized that packaged 
programs did not offer desired 
courses or failed to provide 
sufficient coverage of topics 
of contemporary interest, such 
as the environment or Asian 
studies. Or perhaps W&M 
offered too much, like Bas- 
kin-Robbins or the Wythe Candy 
Store. Whatever the reason, 
over sixty students this year 
were inspired to develop an in- 
terdisciplinary major. Further- 
more, of the fifty junior and 
senior interdisciplinary con- 
centrators, six chose honors 
studies in their multi-dimen- 
sioned major fields. 

While the interdisciplinary 
major exhibited degrees of free- 
dom in delineating his studies, 
he was not without constraints. 
Each proposal was subject to 
careful scrutiny by the Com- 
mittee on Interdisciplinary 
Study, comprised of a cross- 
campus variety of departmental 
representatives. The Committee 
screened programs to ensure 
maintenance of a well-balanced, 
liberal arts curriculum and 
avoidance of a too-narrow 
concentration, consequently, re- 
quired credit hours were numer- 
ous, usually totalling 39 to 39 
semester credits. Furthermore, 
the interdisciplinary major 
sometimes met with disapproval 
by professors who, according 
to Committee Chairman Professor 
Jim Thompson, eschewed the 
major as a "watered down con- 
centration." Nevertheless, 
interdisciplinary study added 
new directions to the W&M 
curriculum by allowing students 
to challenge a perhaps dated 
liberal arts curriculum. 



99/Interdisciplinary 




100/Graduates 



BIOLOGY SPARKS A 
NEW EXCITEMENT 



Norman Jaffee, twenty-six 
years old, is a second- 
year biology graduate at W & M. 
At the end of his two year 
program, Norm planned to pre- 
sent and defend his thesis on 
optimum nesting conditions of 
bald eagles. Unlike business 
and law graduate students, a 
biology Masters candidate must 
write a creative thesis and map 
out his own program. Although 
William and Mary does not offer 
a Ph.D. program in biology, 
Norm viewed this as an ad- 
vantage to Masters candidates, 
as more attention could be 
devoted to the latter program. 

Norm managed to finance his 
studies by serving as a teach- 



ing assistant for Bio 101-102 
labs. In this way, he earned 
his tuition and a stipend for 
living expenses. Jaffee, who 
drew up and corrected quizzes, 
felt that being a student him- 
self had made him more sensitive 
to the issue of grading. He 
found it amusing, yet flat- 
tering, that freshmen often 
expected him to know every- 
thing. During class. Norm 
wore a distinguished-looking 
white lab coat and was 
known to crack a whip to in- 
duce his students to change 
stations during lab practicals. 
Nonetheless, he described 
teaching his "bright group" as 
very rewarding. 



Norm found that he needed to 
devote a great deal of time to 
completing his thesis. He did 
the majority of his field work 
during the fall so he would not 
disturb the birds' breeding 
season. His data will enable 
him to make management proposals 
for the conservation of eagles, 
which he hoped would help him 
secure a job in wildlife conser- 
vation after graduation. When 
asked why he chose to study 
biology. Norm responded that 
often while working, he sud- 
denly comes across a "Wow!" 
For Norman Jaffee, the ex- 
citement of discovering phe- 
nomena new to himself made 
all the studying worthwhile. 




Graduates/101 




Graduate Associations 
Foster Involvement 



At William and Mary the 
graduate programs were 
classified under one of the 
following schools: Arts and 
Sciences, Law, Education, and 
Business. When a student 
entered a graduate program 
he no longer aimed at "broad- 
ening the educational exper- 
ience," as is stressed in the 
undergraduate programs. In- 
stead, he was able to narrow 



down his interests and con- 
centrate heavily on a special 
aspect of his field. 

Due to limited on-campus 
housing (JBT and Ludwell were 
about the only possibilities), 
most grads lived in apartments 
or shared a house together. 
Both the physical detachment 
and a general difference of 
interests tended to isolate 
the grad student from the 



mainstream of undergraduate 
programs and activities. In 
order to provide fellowship 
and departmental communication 
each of the schools had an 
association of student members. 
Although interest was varied, 
each association offered a 
chance for involvement. 

ABOVE: MBA grad Karen Wagner is one 
of the few females living at JBT. 



102/Graduates 




Program Of fcrs Variety 



Professionals and those who 
were already teaching at 
local institutions accounted 
for the majority of grad stu- 
dents in the School of Educa- 
tion. Of the 450 students in 
this school, relatively few 
were registered as full-time. 
This graduate program appealed 
mostly to professors returning 
for further education, high 
school teachers seeking a prin- 
cipalship, and others in the 



field of education who were 
interested in working toward an 
administrative position. 

Rod Owen, president of the 
Education Graduate Student 
Association, commented on the 
flexibility of the department. 
"Because most education stu- 
dents hold a job during the 
day, the department schedules 
classes in the evening as an 
accommodation to the workers. 
Also, due to the varying back- 



grounds and interests of our 
students, it is necessary to 
offer a variety of degrees." 
Owen explained that possible 
areas of study included Spe- 
cial Education, Guidance and 
Counseling, Secondary Educa- 
tion, and Higher Education. 

UPPER LEFT: A grad studies in solitude. 
UPPER RIGHT: Rod Owen, President of the 
EGSA, develops study skills programs. 
BELOW: Discussions enhance classwork. 




Graduates/103 



200 Years Behind the Bar 




Perhaps the most tightly- 
knit group of grads were 
the law students of the 
Marshall- Wythe School of Law. 
Their Student Bar Association 
sponsored numerous activities 
throughout the year, including 
a "wild and crazy" toga party 
early in autumn. The end of 
each week was celebrated by a 
TGIF party on Friday evenings 
at the Grad Student Center 
located behind Sorority Court. 
Here, students had the chance 
to fill up on beer and re-hash 
the problems and delights of 
the law student's life. 

LEFT: Large lecture classes exist 

even in graduate programs. 

FAR LEFT: Law students congregate 

during a class break. 

LOWER LEFT: Grads prove during a 

TGIF party that one never grows too 

old to clown around. 



104/Graduates 



LEFT: Business grads relax at the end 
of the week. 

BELOW: In the MBA lounge, Ken Fitchett 
takes a minute to catch up on work. Every 
graduate learns to value his free moments. 




MBAA's 

Utwv^ind 



The Masters of Business 
Administration Associ- 
ation (MBAA) was based in Jones 
Hall. A lounge on the second 
floor provided a quiet refuge 
in between classes for the 287 
part-time and full-time stu- 
dents. Here, one could grab a 
cup of coffee and check the 
blackboard for current pro- 
grams: perhaps an Association 
Softball game on Saturday after- 
noon, or a Friday night party. 

LEFT: A party at Monroe provides a 
chance for grads and undergrads to mix. 






Graduates/105 



lonorori 



m 



106/Honoraries 



eadership, scholarship, and 
. J service are the qualities 
by which students are chosen 
for Mortar Board. Sponsoring 
the Yule Log ceremony with 
ODK, selling mums at Homecom- 
ing, and community service pro- 
jects are some of the activities 
of this group of Junior and 
Senior men and women. 



Cathy Allen 
Alice Averette 
Jim Barry 
Ginny Bumgardne 
Laura Carmen 
Linda Ciavarelli 
Joe CuUen 
Kathy Dalton 
Diana Henderson 
Chris Hux 
Sharon Jacobs 
Dottie Jung 
Andy Lark 
Molly Macauley 
Sue Manix 



Nancy Shelton 
Janet Steele 
Graham Tancill 
Brooke Trible 
Scott Weaver 
Sandy Watermai 
Cherry Williams 
Cathy Wolford 



Jl^v ixteen students were 
V_y chosen this year to serve 
as President's Aides. Presi- 
dent Graves confers monthly 
with this select group of stu- 
dents on the development of 
the College. 



Karim 


1 Ahamed 


Cathy 


Allen 


Linda 


Andersor 


Julie Berman 


Kathe 


rine Dalt( 


Keith 


Harrison 


Christ 


ine Kurtz 


Susan 
Willia 


Manix 


Fredei 
Marga 


■ick Mors( 
iret Nelso 


Kevin 


Odor 


Stever 


1 Thode 




3 Trible 



' 'his year Scabbard and 
- - Blade celebrates the 
30th anniversary of its 
founding here at William and 
Mary. Keeping a low profile, 
this military honor society 
concerns itself with commun- 
ity and College service pro- 
jects. 



Thomas Bell 
Walter Davis 
Samuel Eure 
Nancy Fahey 
Neil Kingsley 
David Lozier 
Thomas Maybern 
Mark Meuschke 
Carl Siebentritt 
Caryn Wagner 
Kingston Winget 
Emily Yowell 




Honoraries/107 



Susan Aldrich 
Carol Arnold 
Alvis Austin, Jr. 
Teresa Bledsoe 
Ginny Bumgardner 
Heath Carney 
Steven Collins 
Deborah Cutter 
Mary Eaton 
Donna Eccard 
Lisa Ferentinos 
Debra Fulford 
Gregory Harrington 
Diana Henderson 
Diane Hopkins 
Noreen Keating 



Stephen Macedo 
Amy Moll 
Richard Muenchow 
Karen Mulvany 
Stephen Nichols 
Elizabeth Patten 
Donald Patterson 
Lisa Payne 
Paul Reilly 
Janet Steele 
Steven Thode 
Linda Timberlake 
Cheryl Washer 
Scott Wayland 
Catherine Wolford 



' I his year thirty-one 
i- seniors joined the long 
hst of outstanding members of the 
distinguished Phi Beta Kappa 
Society. 



Kenneth Anderson 
Carol Arnold 
Joyce Batchelor 
Deborah Brand 
Georgia Bransco 
Thomas Camber.. 
Mona Caufield 
Brian Easton 
William Farrand 
James Feins 
Scott Gordon 
Arthur Halpert 
Rae Haltiwanger 
Keith Hammer 
Catherine Hartsog 
Alan Hilliker 
Kenneth Horton 
Andrea Kent 
Janice Lewis 
Molly Macauley 
Stephen Macedo 
Eric Manes 
Susan Manix 
Donna McCoUu 
Cathy McMena., 
Heather Meldrui 
Charles Mendez 
Amy Moll 



\n interest in eco- 
nomics and a good grade 
point average are the require- 
ments for membership in Omicron 
Delta Epsilon. Working closely 
with the Economics Club, ODE 
sponsors knowledgeable speakers 
and social gatherings. 

JuUe Moore 

Robert Morrow 

Robert Muscalus 

David Mushinski 

William Newell 

Jeffrey Oleynik 

Diane Peruffo 

Holly Potter 

Karen Przypyszny 

Paul Reilly 

Martha Rhyne 

Robert Rothacker 

Jeff Rupp 

Lois Schertz 

Michael Schmittlein 

Elizabeth Schuette 

Kathy Setzer 

Cheryl Smith 

Teresa Smith 

George Stuker' ' — 

Sharon Stumi 

Alexander Tafro 

George Teeter 

Catherine Wolford 



U micron Delta Kappa hon- 
ors Juniors and Seniors 
in the top thirty-five per- 
cent of their class who show 
leadership abilities. With 
Mortar Board, ODK sponsors 
the annual Yule Log ceremony. 
Luncheons with community 
leaders keep ODK informed 
of Williamsburg's needs. 

Cathy Allen 
Carol Arnold 
Chip Austin 
Thomas Braun 
Ginny Bumgardner 
Thomas Cambem 
Laura Carman 
Nancy Fahey 
Libba Galloway 
David Gifford 
Chris Hux 
Beverly Karch 
Patty Kuntz 
Sue Manix 
William McElyea 
Bill Mims 
Amy Moll 
Deirdre MuUane 
Cheryl Proscino 
Janet Steele 
Brooke Trible 
Sandy Waterman 
Scott Weaver 



108/Honoraries 



This year the Society For 
Collegiate Journalists 
hosted Robert Pierpoint as their 
Journalist-in-Residence and 
spring banquet speaker. 



Anna Barron 
Jamie Baylis 
John Bloom 
Caroline Bolte 
Dean Buckius 
Victoria Dervishian 
Laura Fesler 
David Garland 
Keith Harrison 
Douglas Kirkpatrick 
Kathryn Lloyd 
Susan Maag 
Molly Macauley 
Sallie McNeish 
Andy Morse 



Cathy Allen 
Carol Arnold 
Alice Averette 
Douglas Ayres 
Michael Bradshaw 
Gerald Brown 

"--ngardner 
Laura Carman 
Nelda Casper 
Katherine Dalton 
Walter Davis 
William Fields 
David Gifford 
Michael Giguere 
John Gilstrap 
Anne Gochenour 
Birdie Hairston 
Kathy Hirschi 
Christopher Hux 
Beverly Karch 
Walter Kramer 
Robert Lacy 
Joseph Lark 
Kevin Loud 
Kirk Laurence 



Judith Plavnick 
Cynthia Samuels 
Steve Seele 
Thomas Shannon 
Mary Anne 
Bill Silkworth 
Katherine Sitterson 
Gretchen Smith 
Brett Snyder 
Kyle Sonnenberg 
Tracey Stephenson 
Laurie Trepanier 
Kevin Walker 
Matthew Zoller 
stine Zvosec 



Susan Manix 
Bruce Matson 
Sherri McCandless 
Robert McFarlin 
William Mims 
Frederick Morse 
Arthur Moseley 
Robert Muscalus 
Margaret Nelson 
Kevin Odor 
Roderic Owen 
James Ryan 
Nancy Shelton 
Susan Snediker 
Marianne Springer 
Andrew Steinberg 
Steven Thode 
Andrew Thurman 
Brooke Trible 
Beverly Wallace 
Avei 
Gloria Whittico 
Steven Willett 
Artis Williams 
Julie Williams 

N" " oteworthy seniors are 
^ recognized by a campus 
committee to represent Will- 
iam and Mary in Who's Who 
Among Students in American 
Universities and Colleges. , 



h H.C., the oldest colle- 
L , giate fraternity, is a 
society and honorary society 
comprised of twelve junior 
and senior men. The meaning 
of the letters is known only 
to the members of the 
society. 

Clayton Clemens 
Bruce Davidson 

is Hogge 
Walter Kramer 
Kevin Odor 
Jeffrey Oleynik 
Kevin Rossiter 
Joseph Ryan HI 
John Savage 
Charles Sharman, Jr. 
George Stukenbroeker 
Steven Willett 



Honoraries/109 




no/Play 





The day to day tension and 
pressure at William and 
Mary was relieved when the stu- 
dent relaxed or "played." With 
a glass of beer, a game of pin- 
ball, or a strenuous game of ten- 
nis, the student could unwind 
and, for awhile, forget the pres- 
sures of academics, the problems 
of friends, or the demands of 
family. 

Play was an escape for the Wil- 
liam and Mary student. He could 
throw frisbee in the sunken gar- 
dens or patronize the Hospita- 
lity Center on Friday after- 
noons. Or, he could partici- 
pate in a varsity sport or a 
theater production. Also, 
the student could join a club 
or become active in student 
government. But whatever the 
activity, the play was impor- 
tant. It was a way to unwind 
and become more involved in 
the College community. With 
such an involvement, the Col- 
lege community became more 
personal for the William and 
Mary student. 



Play/111 




1 12/Oreanizations 



DIAVISBBL 




Q) ecognition was the major 
goal of the Society for 
Collegiate Journalists in the 
1978-1979 school year. An honor 
society composed of students who 
maintained a high GPA while work- 
ing on a school media staff, the 
Society aimed at more than being 
just another title for its mem- 
bers' grad school applications. 
According to Rosemary Harold, 
President, "We're just trying 
to let people know that journal- 
ism does exist at William and 
Mary, and of quite a high qual- 
ity, especially considering that 
everything is done on a strictly 
extra-curricular basis. The 
time the members put into their 
respective publications is enor- 
mous — and I think we all deserve 
a little pat on the back." 

In order to establish a name 
for themselves on campus, the 
members of the Society sponsored 
a mixer in February. The funds 
generated were channelled into 
improving the annual "Journalist 



In Residence" program. Sponsored 
every spring by the SCJ, the pro- 
gram brought a respected media 
personality to the College for 
lecture and discussions. This 
program was capped off by the 
yearly Publications Banquet in 
the Great Hall of the Wren 
Building. 

Along with working hard to 
increase membership by initia- 
ting all eligible students into 
the society, the SCJ turned 
its attention in the spring to 
a venture that had been pro- 
posed a number of times over 
the past few years, though with 
little success as of yet. The 
establishment of a formal jour- 
nalism course to be included in 
the regular curriculum had found 
some faculty support as well as 
good student enthusiasm. SCJ 
members hoped to someday 
flip through their course cata- 
logues and see that student de- 
mand could have an effect on the 
curriculum after all. 

ABOVE; Journalism's future at W&M is 
the major concern of Rosemary Harold, SC 
SCJ president and Echo copy editor. 

LEFT: SCJ members Leslie Staton, Chris 
Zvosec, and Anne Cornet take a break 
from work on College publications. 



Society of Collegiate Joumalists/113 



Lectures, films, and social 
events were three ways in 
which the History Students Or- 
ganization sought to increase 
students' interest in history 
during 1978-79. A major ob- 
jective of HSO was to encourage 
familiarity between students 
and faculty, which resulted in 
increased member participation 
in casual learning activities 
sponsored by the organization. 

Fall activities began with 
a keg party at Lake Matoaka, 
where students and professors 
mingled in an informal atmo- 
sphere. Faculty members 
discussed topics of special 




FAR ABOVE: Lecturer Ludwell Johnson 
uses a map of Virginia to emphasize a point. 



ABOVE: LEFT TO RIGHT: Mark Dennett, 
Leslie McFaden, Kevin Ruffner, Sue Amot, 
Judith Ewell, advisor, Jeff Fatten, Maria 
Fakadej, Richard Ifft, Bea Trapasso, Pam 
Caldwell. 



114/History Students Organization 





TY REACTIVAT 





Id) ejuvenation" was the 
ir^ keyword for Kappa Delta 
Pi this year. The education 
honor society had not been ac- 
tive on campus for several 
years, but the 1978-79 members 
showed enthusiasm for numerous 
projects. In November, members 
gathered informally at the home 
of their advisor. Dr. Roger 
Ries. December initiation 
ceremonies were followed by a 
potluck dinner. Other activ- 
ities included collecting 
statistics on education majors 
and holding open meetings with 
speakers. Initiation, held 
each semester, increased Kappa 
Delta Pi's ranks. Members 
were required to have a GPA of 
3.0 and a faculty recommenda- 
tion; the group included primary 
and secondary education majors, 
graduate students, and professors. 

ABOVE: Kappa Delta Pi's consider a pos- 
sible speaker for a spring program. 

LEFT: Advisor Roger Ries discusses the 
group's goals for the year. 



Kappa Delta Pi/115 




ABOVE: Homecoming float competition 
results in a first place for the BSO. 

RIGHT: Members listen to an explanation 
of plans for Operation Bus. 

UPPER RIGHT: BSO President, Shawn 
Keyes, is interested in bringing black 
culture to W&M. 

FAR RIGHT: Discussion of future pro- 
jects brings a smile to Phyllis Terrell's 
face. 



116/Black Students Organization 




MINORITY 
ATTRACTION 



We're here to meet the 
certain purpose of pro- 
viding an outlet for black stu- 
dents as well as to expose more 
William and Mary students to 
black culture. Also, we're in- 
terested in giving service to 
the Williamsburg community as 
a whole," stated Shawn Keyes of 
the Black Students Organization. 
In 1978-79, BSO continued its 
tradition of activity through 
various projects. A disco and 
a hayride were among BSO's 
social events, along with a 
November tour of the Penin- 
sula area. For Homecoming 
weekend, BSO held a Homecoming 
Ball and a reception for black 
alumni. They also entered a 



float in the Homecoming Parade 
and, as a result, won first 
place in the open division. 
For Thanksgiving, BSO members 
collected a food basket for a 
needy family. 

Attracting minority students 
to W&M was a major goal of BSO 
this year. The group sponsored 
"Operation Bus" twice during 
the year; prospective students 
from the Richmond and Washing- 
ton areas were bussed to W&M 
to visit the campus and meet 
students and professors. In 
April, newly accepted minority 
students were invited to "Week- 
end With Us," when BSO organized 
meetings and social events to 
inform new students about W&M life. 



Black Students Organization/117 




118/Circle K 




After twenty-one years at 
William and Mary, Circle 
K was still serving the commun- 
ity in various ways during 1978 
-79. Every Wednesday, members 
met at the Circle K office on 
South Boundary Street to plan 
projects and future activities. 
Student volunteers participated 
in money-making projects, in- 
cluding working as ushers at 
concerts and basketball games, 
to support the group's programs. 
Tutoring was held every Satur- 
day morning in Washington Hall. 
Children from Chickahominy at- 
tended a weekday afternoon pre- 
school organized by Circle K 
members. Students visited and 
aided senior citizens, hoping 
to brighten the sometimes gloo- 
my world of the elderly. The 
Weekly Educational Opportunity 
Program allowed students a 
chance to share their talents 
with others. Saturday recrea- 
tion activities included trips 
to nearby landmarks and outings 
at local parks. The Circle K 
bus was a familiar sight on 
Williamsburg streets. By parti- 
cipating in Circle K, W&M stu- 
dents could take breaks from 
studying, have fun, and provide 
valuable and necessary commun- 
ity services. 



Circle K/119 



Although this was the 
first year of Alpha Phi 
Omega's existence on campus, 
the local chapter of the na- 
tional service fraternity 
proved to be one of the more 
active groups at W&M. Founded 
and based on the principles of 
Scouting, APO is the largest 
national fraternity. "We're 
not a fraternity in the tra- 
ditional sense, although we 
have Greek letters, a pledge 
period, and rituals. Our 
emphasis is on service, 
especially short-term service 
projects. Before we organized, 
we discussed whether or not a 
group of our type was needed at 
W&M. We decided it was. Other 
service groups do long-term 
projects, but a group was 
needed for the one-time things," 
explained President George 
Homewood. 

APO members emphasized the 
fraternity ideals of leader- 
ship, friendship, and service 
in their 1978-79 activities. 
The group worked with youth at 
Eastern State and with a new 
Scout troop in Williamsburg. 
Members handled publicity for 
the Cut-a-thon, which benefited 
the Red Cross's CPR program, 
and for the pumpkin sale and 
carving contest, which benefited 
retarded citizens in the 
Williamsburg area. APO mem- 
bers also participated in the 
College Phone-a-thon and 
worked with the Bloodmobile 
in November. Initiation of 
new members was held December 
2, with a banquet and dance, 
the major social event of the 
APO year, held in the spring. 

TOP: Participation in the Campaign for 
the College is one of several APO 
activities. 

BOTTOM: A "Pumpkin" T-shirt is dis- 
played to members by George Homewood. 




120/Alpha Phi Omega 





HELPl 





The Williamsburg Area 
Tutorial Service, better 
known as WATS, had a very pro- 
ductive year in 1978-79. the 
WATS house was renovated 
through the efforts of 
Dr. Del Keys and her husband, 
with volunteers helping com- 
plete work begun in the summer. 
WATS served as a preschool for 
underprivileged three-to-five- 
year-olds in the Williamsburg 
area. Student volunteers helped 
the children develop basic 
skills, supervised them in out- 
door recreation, and organized 
projects and special trips 
during the year. The 1978-79 



WATS program was directed by 
Beth Shine, Teresa DiRosa and 
Anne Walton. According to 
DiRosa, "We started in WATS 
last year because we wanted to 
do something to serve the com- 
munity, not just social activ- 
ities, and we like working with 
kids. Besides, it's a nice 
change from campus life — you 
rarely see kids on campus!" 

TOP: Volunteer Sara Major shares a 
quiet moment with a new little friend. 

LEFT: Afternoon sessions at the WATS 
house prove enjoyable for "Number 32." 



WATS/121 




THE MYAL R 




ABOVE: Women, finally admitted to mem- 
bership in the Queen's Guard last year, 
are now an integral part of the group. 



By participating in pa- 
rades, at football games, 
and in ceremonies, the Queen's 
Guard served as a unique re- 
minder of William and Mary's 
British heritage. Under the 
leadership of Commander Tom 
Bell and Sergeant Major Carl 
Siebentritt, the Guard perform- 
ed at the Homecoming Parade and 
at the traditional Homecoming 
Sunset Ceremony. Also, they won 
second place in the Williams- 
burg Christmas Parade. On March 
31, the Guard sponsored the Co- 
lonial Invitational Drill Meet 
at WiUiam and Mary Hall, with 
over thirty high schools and 
colleges competing. According 



to Bell, "The meet has two ma- 
jor purposes. It is a fund rai- 
ser for the Guard, but we hope 
it will be something good and 
interesting for the College." 

The Queen's Guard contin- 
ued to receive its support from 
alumni, and Sergeant Major John 
Cato again served as advisor. 
The uniforms were modeled on 
British designs, and the drills 
were taken from the British 
Manual of Arms. Originally a 
ROTC honor guard formed for 
Queen Elizabeth's 1957 visit to 
Williamsburg, it became a per- 
manent organization in 1961 and 
now is open to all interested 
W&M men and women. 



122/Queen's Guard 





HITTH 
SLOPE 



Picture yourself crawling 
out of a warm bed, peering 
out of a modern condominium 
window to see the snow and tree- 
covered mountains of Vermont. 
You move into the cozy living 
room to make a determined attempt 
at building a roaring fire in the 
fireplace as some friends start 
breakfast in the kitchen; but your 
mind is preoccupied with visions 
of racing down the slopes, knees 
bent, trying not to smile too 
much as you rocket over a field 
of snow .... 

Sound like a skier's dream? 
The United Skiers of Virginia 
helped turn this dream into a 
reality for 95 W&M students by 
organizing a group excursion to 
Sugarbush, Vermont during Christmas. 
Taking advantage of the group 
size and lower mid-week rates, 
the cost of the trip was greatly 
reduced, and bus transportation, 
though boring, rid skiers of the 
complications of driving in bad 
weather. The well-organized trip 
also provided ski movies, keg 
parties, and group discounts on 
rentals, beer, and even a night 
at the local disco. "The skiing 
was good," reported President Steve 
Willett who pointed to the close, 
homogeneous group and good weather 
conditions as important elements 
of the fun. The trip went so well 
that the club planned to return 
during spring break. 

TOP: Ski trips allow Bruce McFarlin and 
Craig Morris a chance to clown around. 

LEFT: Wooded trails challenge Dianne 
Murphy's skiing skills. 



United Skiers of Virginia/123 



ONI THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL 



ith an overall member- 
ship of 223 and a full 
schedule of activities, the 
W&M College Republicans were 
among the most active persons 
on campus this year. Starting 
with Orientation Week, when 
new members were recruited, 
the group soon busied itself 
in the Warner for Senate and 
Trible for Congress campaigns. 
A political preference survey, 
participation in the Student 
Mock Election, and a club- 
sponsored movie night were 
held during the fall semester, 
along with study breaks. CR 
members hosted the second an- 
nual Seafood Fest, attended by 
Elizabeth Taylor Warner, Rep. 
Paul Trible, and state party 
chairman George McMath, on 
September 30 at Lake Matoaka. 
Members took enough time off 
from the campaigns to build a 
float for the Homecoming Pa- 
rade, which won second place 
in the open division. On Elec- 
tion Day, CR members manned 
all area polls, campaigning 
strenuously for their candi- 
dates Warner and Trible, who 
were declared the winners 
that night. Second semester 
meetings involved members in 
planning future work for both 
the Republican Party and the 
College community. 

LEfT TO RIGHT: FIRST flOW— Anne-Merle Bryant, 
Andy Lark, Peter Bortner, Dave Mclntyre, Beverly English, 
Rick Huret, Larry Fineran, Dave Lozier, Ray Halite. 
SECOND iiOlV— Steve Collins, Jo Hoffman, Dave 
McKinney, Mark Dennett, Jay MorriB, Kim Skelly, Mark 
Lawler, John Martin. Jan Pickrell, THIRD fiOlV— Randolph 
Beales, Chuck Swaim, Anne Pennewell, Kelly Curtis, John 
Markey. Beth Moncure. FOURTH ROW —Robert Jones 
Lany Lile, Tom Brooke, Bill Naphy, Sidney Brown, Stacey 
Sterling, Glenn Lapkin. FIFTH ROW— Eddie Carroll, Will 
NeiU. 




. - ■>:ii<i?&-'-r>»«i-r- 



124/College Republicans 




CTIO 



Qnce again, the Biology 
Club's activities proved 
that biology is not just dis- 
section and plant-growing. 
However, the club members' 
skill at cultivating plants 
paid off in the second annual 
Plant Sale, held to raise funds 
for a biologically-oriented 
project. Backpacking trips to 
the mountains allowed students 
opportunities to relax and 
observe nature. Rock climbing 
was a sport that attracted some 
of the braver group members. 
During the year, the club 
sponsored lectures by Dr. Max- 
een Bibben on cat behavior and 
Dr. Stanton Hoegerman on cyto- 



o o o 



genetics. Also, it held a 
showing of an autopsy film from 
MCV. A major undertaking was 
the writing of a constitution 
to state the club's goals and 
purposes. President Ralph 
Wilson concluded, "Our major 
goal is to provide and stimu- 
late academic interest in bi- 
ology by sponsoring lectures 
and field trips for students." 

LEFT: Club member inspects plants that 
will later be sold at the Plant Sale. 

BELOW: Rebecca Hall, Nana Bain, 
Jennifer Hall, Ralph Wilson, Pam 
Kopelove, Dan Kenan, Gayle Leinberry, 
Jeff Price. 



m. 



^:^^;:^s^!?«^;-s«:l^=^ 



Clayton-Grimes Biology Club/125 



elta Omicron, the prof- 

fessional music frater- 
nity for women, celebrated its 
twenty-fifth year on the Wil- 
liam and Mary campus, February 
6. With its threefold purposes 
of stimulating musicianship, 
friendship among musicians on 
campus, and scholarship. Delta 
Omicron was often more active 
than other W&M honoraries. It 
was definitely one of the more 
audible, as its members partici- 
pated in many musical activities. 
Monthly musicales, open to the 
public, gave members the oppor- 
tunity to perform for an audience, 
while the annual music competi- 
tion encouraged musical interest 
on campus. 

In addition to this and its 
collaboration with Phi Mu Alpha 
on the yearly production of a 
Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, 
DO also provided service to the 
campus in the form of a service 
project for W&M's Music Department. 




HARMONY 




TOP: Keri Viehweg takes care of the many 
details of costume design. 



RIGHT: At the Viennese Ball, Jerry Ko- 
walski and Kathy Miller waltz gracefully 



126A)elta Omicron 




Although an honorary music 
fraternity, Phi Mu Alpha 
Sinfonia was concerned with more 
than "making music." It's scope 
was much wider and inclusive. 
As a result, Phi Mu Alpha's na- 
tional organization awarded Wil- 
liam and Mary's chapter, Nu Sig- 
ma, the Charles Lutton Memorial 
Province Merit Award for 1975- 
1978. According to Tom Cambern, 
Phi Mu Alpha President, the a- 
ward was based on seven criteria: 
province interaction, community 
service, membership development, 
musical achievement, chapter co- 
operation, alumni relations, and 
fraternal traditions. In all 
categories, Nu Sigma chapter 
scored perfectly. 

Of its many activities, the 
most time consuming was the year- 
ly production, in conjunction with 
Delta Omicron, the women's music 
fraternity, of a Gilbert and Sul- 
livan operetta. This year it was 
"Patience," the story of a milk- 
maid and her many suitors. 

Other activities pursued by the 
fraternity included sponsoring an 
American Composers Recital, 
ushering for the Concert Series, 
presenting Christmas programs at 
a local nursing home, planning a 
program to introduce music to chil- 
dren in the public schools, spon- 
soring a formal waltz in April, 
and awarding a scholarship to a 
music major. 

An important contact for Phi Mu 
Alpha was Delta Omicron. The two 
fraternities not only shared com- 
mon interests; they also social- 
ized together at spaghetti sup- 
pers, square dances, and the for- 
mal waltz. 

TOP: Scenery becomes "real" with Paul 
Macek's artistic efforts. 



LEFT: FIRST ROW. left to right: Tom Cambern (President), 
Chris Hux. Bill Weiser (Vice-President), Jerry Kowalski, 
Mike Rogan (Secretary), John Gilstrap, Carl Meyer (Treasurer). 
SECOND ROW: David Turner, Paul Macek, Bruce Jones, George 
Graham, Anthony Burcher, Richard Diakun, Bryan Coughlan, Jay 
Radcr. THIRD ROW: David Paulson, Art Rawding, David Eye, 
Greg Bartholomew, Jeff Graham, Jason Gibbs, David Brown, Tom 
O'Doherty, FOURTH ROW: Mark Meuschke, Jon Lombard, Gary 
Plaag, Robby Allen, David Ermlick, Steve Munson, Wovne 
Curtis. 



Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia/127 



DEBAT 



abating was revived this 
year at William and Mary 
by the new members of the De- 
bate Council. Despite its small 
size, the group worked hard at 
reestablishing the Council on 
campus. Most members were new 
at debating, but as the organ- 
ization was composed of under- 
classmen, expectations for the 
future were great. As Frances 
Bradley commented, "We have a 
very young team, but everyone 
shares in the work and is get- 
ting plenty of experience." 
Much of that experience was 
gained at tournaments. The de- 
baters participated in five 
competitions during the first 
semester, and planned to attend 
others during second semester. 




In January, the group traveled 
to Missouri for a tournament at 
Southwest Missouri State. 
This was the first year that 
Gary Pike of the Speech Depart- 
ment served as debate coach. 
Pike, himself an experienced 
debater, encouraged students in 
their efforts to build up the 
debate program on campus. 

TOP: Left to Right: Gary Pike, coach, 
Colin Buckley, Lisa Henning, Frances 
Bradley, John Gemer, Leslie Sokol, 
John Markey, Mike Tankersley. 

RIGHT: Information cards are important 
debate aids for Frances Bradley and 
Colin Buckley. 



128/Debate Council 






CHI 



II hope the Psychology Club 
U will prove a setting where 
people can meet their peers in 
psychology, serve as a vehicle 
for an exchange of ideas, and 
facilitate growth both person- 
ally and academically," de- 
clared club president Peter 
Wooldridge. This year's ac- 
tivities schedule enabled 
members to accornplish many 
projects — some social, some 
academic, but all relating to 
the field of psychology. Pro- 
fessors and graduate students 
teamed up against undergradu- 
ates in a departmental Softball 
game in the fall. Holidays 
meant parties: one at Hallo- 
ween for club members, and 
"T-Shirt Night" at the Green 
Leafe Cafe, where club T-shirts 
and beer were the main attrac- 
tions, just before Christmas 
break. Also, members held a 
Valentine's Day party for 
children at Eastern State. 
Various lectures with topics 
ranging from humor and crea- 
tivity to sex roles, were 
sponsored by the club during 
the year. Students interested 
in further studies in psych- 
ology received information at 
club programs on graduate 
schools and careers in psych- 
ology. The group's most last- 
ing achievement for the year 
was the founding of a chapter 
of Psi Chi, the psychology 
honor fraternity, on campus. 

LEFT: Psychology Club members proudly 
display their mascot panda bear in a 
Millington stairwell. 



Psychology Club/129 



UNmN 




DSOUL 



"T 



he black belt represents 
not only physical devel- 
opment, but development of the 
individual as well," explained 
Karate Club instructor Jon Sa- 
kata. This year, 80 members 
pursued the study of karate 
under the guidance of Shihan 
Hamada, the club's overall in- 
structor. Hamada, an eighth 
degree black belt, is one of 
three men in the world with the 
rank of Hanshi, a professional 
title awarded by the Butoku- 
kai in Japan. A graduate of 
W&M, he has instructed at W&M 
for over ten years. Assisting 
Hamada as instructors this 
year were Sakata, John Ambro- 
siano, and Dan Snow, the club 
president. Classes were con- 
ducted in the "traditional 
manner," with emphasis on both 
the spiritual and physical as- 
pects of karate. Members com- 
peted in the AAIJ, Azalea, and 
Third Inter-coH^iate Karate 
Tournaments this year. In ad- 
dition to inter-collegiate com- 
petition, the Karate Club 
sought to achieve its goal of 
promoting "the development of 
martial arts on campus through 
instructional classes, tourna- 
ments, clinics, and demonstra- 
tions," as Sakata summarized. 

RIGHT: In class, Jon Sakata strives to 
perfect his techniques of karate. 




130/Karate Club 




LEFT: Developing basics is important 
for Brent Jackson, Jeff Michelland, and 
Kendall Acors. 



BELOW: Left to Right: Shihan Hamada, instruc- 
tor. First Row — Jon Sakata, Dan Snow, John Am- 
brosiano. Paul Powell, George Kazepis, Lynn 
Brewster, Brent Jackson. Jeff Michelland, Mary 
Chan. Kendall Acors, Peter Ashooh, Marston 
Youngblood. David Keith. Tim Sampson. Deana 
Malloy. SECOND ROW— Sarah Wilkins. Mike Bloom, 
Jay MacPherson, Joe Cullen, Russel Smith, Janet 
Henly, Joe Scott. Steve McGee, Pradeep Gupta, 
Tamara Lacey, Lee Badger. THIRD ffOlV— Padmini 
Sokkappa. Nori Nagashima. Tony Ruiz, Keith Har- 
rison, Hale Wilson, Albert Joyce, Karen Wyatt, 
Kevin Nary. Henry Yamashita, Mao Schomo, Shao- 
Li, Sarah Johnson, Bill Harrod, Laura Sander- 
son, Dona Moore. Bill Davis. 



Karate Club/131 



KYDIV 




hile the William and Mary 
Sport Parachute Club did 
not actually become a campus 
organization until the fall of 
1978, the first spark of inter- 
est occurred a year earlier. As 
Bill Legard, club president, 
remarked, "It's something we 
always wanted to do." Students 
approached Dean Smith this fall 
and obtained permission to or- 
ganize, later writing a consti- 
tution. At an open meeting, the 
members recruited interested 
persons with talks and films. 
Training programs were held, 
with over sixty persons jumping 
at least once. Legard explained 
the training process: "In the 
morning, the person trains for 
five or six hours, going over 
everjrthing that could possibly 
happen. The first jump, a sta- 
tic line jump, is done that af- 
ternoon. Several jumps later, 
the person does a 'dummy rip 
cord' jump. Usually by the sev- 



enth or eighth jump, the person 
is doing a free-fall jump. Most 
people stop after the first 
jump — they only want to try it 
once." 

The club had several major 
goals. One was to further inter- 
est in sport parachuting at the 
College. Another was to become 
competitive in inter-collegiate 
meets. However, Legard admitted 
that a third goal was "just to 
show students how much fun par- 
achuting is." 

The club owned a limited 
amount of equipment and members 
hoped to buy more. T-shirts 
were sold to raise funds. 

RIGHT: Demonstration of jumping tech- 
niques is done by club president Bill 
Legard. 

BELOW: Left to Right: FIRST ROW 
—Dave Sothcott, Bill Legard. SECOND 
ROW— Sandy Taylor, Sandy Mohr, Chris 
Fisher. 




132/Sport Parachute Club 




TOP: Free-fall parachuting is the ul- ABOVE: Tom Fulcher, Al Kitchen, and 
timate goal of the student parachutist. Jim O'Mara ready themselves. 



Sport Parachute Club/133 




134/Government 



05 



O) 



O 

u 



Celebrating its 200th an- 
niversary this year, the 
Honor Council continued to main- 
tain the tradition of William 
and Mary's Honor Code, the old- 
est in the nation. The purpose 
of the Code itself is not to 
provide a strict set of rules, 
but rather to provide a system 
of checks for those who deviate 
from the Honor System at the 
College of William and Mary. 

During the course of the year, 
the Council distributed posters 
to commemorate the Honor Sys- 
tem's 200th anniversary and to 
remind students how much William 
and Mary should be proud of its 
Honor System. 

The Council's fifteen elected 
members kept regular office 
hours to answer questions, dis- 
cuss problems, and remain vis- 
ible. 

Above all, the main respons- 
ibility of the Honor Council 
was to administer the Honor 
Code: to investigate alleged 
offences, hold trials, and de- 
cide on verdicts and penalties. 
In this way the Honor Council 
maintained its tradition. 

LEFT TO RIGHT: FIRST ROW— John Riley. Twyla Parsons. 
Amy Holt. Nancy Shelton. Caroline Jones. Susan Pic- 
kett, Mary Spiri, Steve Anderson, Brooke Trible, 
Sherri McCandlcss. SECOND ROW— Ricky Andrews. Blake 
Velde, Missy Reeks, Dave Jones. 





Honor Council/135 



CD 
Q. 
Q. 
TO 



CD 
TO 



V) 



CD 



CO 




ABOVE: As SA President, Bill Mims 
spearheads the entire SA. 
ABOVE RIGHT: Chairman of the SAC, Ka- 
rim Ahamed, presides over weekly meetings. 
ABOVE FAR RIGHT: This year's bike auc- 
tion is directed by SA member, Julie Berman. 
RIGHT: Students are kept satisfied 
on Wednesday night by Kevin Kennedy, 
Manager of the Hoi Polloi. 
MIDDLE: As Vice-President of Students 
Services, Bob Lacey serves the student body. 
FAR RIGHT: Campus social events are the 
concern of Vice-President of Social 
Events, Phil Kilgore. 




136/SA 




In its first full year of 
operation, the newly reorg- 
anized student government at 
William and Mary remained a puz- 
zle for students to ponder. What 
was the difference between the 
SAC and the SA? How was the BSA 
related to the SAC? 

Trying to clear up some of the 
confusion, an orientation book- 
let was published for the first 
time in the fall explaining the 
functions of the various organ- 
izations. This booklet explained 
that the Student Association (SA) 
is comprised of every undergrad- 
uate student at the College. The 
officers of the SA serve in the 
Executive Council, the Student 
Activities Council (SAC), and 
the Honor Council. 

Serving on the Executive Coun- 
cil this year were Bill Mims, 
President; Kathy Hirschi, Vice- 
President for Cultural Events; 
Phil Kilgore, Vice-President for 
Social Events; Bob Lacy, Vice- 
President for Student Services; 
Sue Malloy, Treasurer; Tricia 
Taaffe, Press-Secretary; and 
Karim Ahamed, SAC Chairperson. 
The Executive Council proposes 
possible activities concerning 
social and cultural affairs to 
the Student Activities Council. 

The Student Activities Council 
(SAC) is the legislative branch 
of the Student Association. The 
Council is elected each fall and 
consists of five day students 
and twenty-five resident repre- 
sentatives from designated 
areas. The SAC has control 
over both the Student Associa- 
tion budget and the room damage 
interest fund. 

All SAC and committee meetings 
were open to members of the stu- 
dent body, and one did not need to 
be an SAC representative in order to 
serve on the committees. Active 
student participation in SA 
functions was encouraged by the 
open meeting system. Without 
the constant dedicated efforts 
of the students participating in 
SA functions, those functions 
could not have been the suc- 
cesses they were this year. 



SA/137 




ABOVE: The book fair continues to grow 
more successful each year. 
ABOVE RIGHT: Daytripping to Washington 
and other points of local interest proves 
to be a successful innovation. 
FAR RIGHT: The banana split is pre- 
pared for the largest food fight in the his- 
tory of the College. 
RIGHT: Technical difficulties cancel 
the opening of the film series, headed by 
Mitch Benedict. 




138/SA Innovations 




Innovation was the word that 
best described the accom- 
plishments of the SAC this year. 
"Daytripping" proved to be most 
successful with trips to area 
plantations, Monticello, Ash 
Lawn, and Washington, D.C. 
museums. Highlighting the 
"Indian Summer" at the end of 
September was the 1500 foot 
banana split in the Sunken Gar- 
dens and the tremendous food 
fight that followed. The Ori- 
ginal Drifters appeared in 
William and Mary Hall the same 
weekend. Under the direction 
of Bob Lacy, Vice-President for 
Student Services, a commitment 
was made for the SA to provide 
for students a mimeograph ser- 
vice, a resource center of cata- 
logues, brochures, and other 



college-related publications, 
and a course and professor eval- 
uation booklet. 

The SAC also continued its 
traditional events. In the Fall 
semester, under sponsorship of 
the SAC, poet James Dickey, 
South African exile Donald Woods, 
and "Animal House" producer 
Chris Miller lectured to stu- 
dents. The Bookfair, held at 
the beginning of each semester, 
handled approximately 35,000 
books and remained a success. 

The Film Series, a program 
unique to William and Mary, of- 
fered over sixty feature-length 
films during the year for a six 
dollar annual subscription rate. 
No other program was so taken 
for granted on campus, yet the 
Film Series would be sorely mis- 



sed if ever discontinued. 

The Hoi Polloi became a semi- 
autonomous social service of the 
SA, though financially it re- 
mained under the aegis of the 
SA. Kevin Kennedy, manager of 
the Pub, planned the weekly e- 
vents of the Hoi Polloi pro- 
viding William and Mary students 
with a wide variety of activities. 

The Student Association active- 
ly supported the movement to im- 
prove faculty salaries. A task 
force comprised of a number of 
present and former SA and BSA 
members issued a report on 
faculty salaries in January. 

Mixing the old with the new, 
the SAC provided students with 
many social and cultural op- 
portunities outside of the 
classroom. 



Emphasizing innovation 



SA Innovations/139 



RIGHT: Chris Kurtz looks for issues re- 
lating to the Environmental Committee. 
BELOW: Dave Garland, Chairman of the Aca 
demic Affairs Committee, studies a pro- 
posal to modify final exam procedure. 
BELOW RIGHT: The Chairman of The BSA, 
Sandy Waterman, heads a council campus- 
wide in scope. 

FAR RIGHT: BSA meetings bring together 
representatives of students, faculty, and 
the administration to discuss campus- 
wide concerns. 




140/BSA 



confronting the issues 



In a conservative instit- 
ution such as William and 
Mary, change comes about very 
slowly. The members of the BSA 
continued to find this out the 
hard way as many of their ideas 
made no progress. Action 
by the Board of Visitors stymied 
any hope of a Latin Honors pro- 
gram at the College. An advis- 
ory board to President Graves 
recommended that a Fall Break 
not be instituted. 

The BSA was organized origin- 
ally as a representative ad- 
visory committee to the Pres- 
ident of the College. It is 
supposed to be a prime source 
of policy recommendation on all 
matters concerning the College 
community, and has final author- 
ity over the allocation of the 
Student Activities Fee. The 
twenty-five member body in- 



cludes administrators, faculty, 
graduate and undergraduate 
students, and is subdivided 
into three standing committees 
(Academics, Environment, and 
Finance), and one ad-hoc (Ath- 
letics). Student representa- 
tives are elected annually on 
both a class and at-large basis; 
the President of the Student 
Association is also a member, 
ex officio. 

The BSA confronted several 
far-reaching issues concerning 
the college community. Athletic 
policy and its future at the 
College remained a topic for 
discussion. The lack of park- 
ing for day students was a prime 
concern for the Finance Commit- 
tee. The BSA recommended to the 
Publications Council that guide- 
lines for representation in the 
Colonial Echo be established 



for future issues. 

Perhaps the two most import- 
ant issues the BSA faced this 
year were the proposed modi- 
fication of final exam proced- 
ures and the problem of low 
faculty salaries. The Academic 
Affairs Committee studied final 
examination procedures of uni- 
versities from all over the 
country. Taking into consid- 
eration the vitality of the 
honor code, the attitude of the 
faculty, and the difficulties 
that might arise, the Committee 
arrived in the fall at a pro- 
posal which would help relieve 
students from some pressure. 
A student whose professor 
taught two different sections 
of the same course had the 
option of choosing the exam- 
ination period that best fit 
his schedule. 




BSA/141 



142/Media 



AN ORIGINAL FOCUS 



Never in its long history 
has there been a student 
at the College with the unusual, 
unique, and even bizarre out- 
look of '79 senior Richard 
Walker. As premier photographer 
for both the Flat Hat and the 
Colonial Echo, Walker has seen 
and photographed things that 
most people did not even know 
existed. Walker's photos from 
the cupola of the Capitol and 
in the catacombs under the Wren 
Building are clear examples of 
his personal focus. 

Walker's perspective wasn't 
exclusively a product of his 
photography, but rather an ac- 
cumulation of an eventful life 
at William and Mary. Describing 
himself as "non-aligned," 
Walker has received numerous 
threats of consummate non-align- 
ment for his participation in 
extraordinary escapades. A mem- 
ber of Hunt Second, "the worst 
freshman hall in history," 
Walker's Fat Head photo of a 
semi-nude hallmate being thrown 
out the window resulted in a 
threat of dismissal for several 
members of the hall. Still, the 
College was to have the next 
laugh when as a sophomore Walker 
found himself consigned to the 
backwater of JBT. Undaunted, 
and grossly dissatisfied with 
the near-slum conditions, Walker 
and his hallmates invited Pre- 
sident Graves out to Walker's 
room. To their surprise, Graves 
accepted! Walker described him 
as, "o.k., but a professional 
yes-man." 

However, senior year reigns 
as Walker's finest hour, as he 
was arrested for extortion. As 
Walker tells the story, a friend 
found a sorority pin one day, 
and by checking the sorority's 
roster and the initials on the 
pin, they were able to trace the 

RIGHT: A familiar sight for students over 
the past four years, Rich Walker waits 
on the sidelines of a basketball game at 
the Hall for the perfect picture angle 
to appear. 



identity of the owner. The pin- 
less sorority girl was anonymous- 
ly advised to be at the Texaco 
station phone booth at ten p.m. 
on Pub night. There, "a clearly 
humorous note" told her that if 
she ever wanted to see her so- 
rority pin alive again, she was 
to deliver a six of the golden 
brew to the O.D. air conditioner 
at a designated hour. Walker's 
humor, however, escaped the coed 
and the Campus Police were called 
in. Although they succeeded in 
apprehending the criminals, 
Walker fovmd their actions 



humorous and ridiculous. 
The beer was delivered to the 
wrong place, and was so poorly 
marked with an identifying dye 
that when Walker and his ransom 
were taken into custody, the ar- 
resting officer stained himself! 
Threatened with notification of 
the FBI, Walker was told that 
if the pin had been a person 
he would have been a kidnapper. 
At the time of this writing, 
Walker had yet to find any lost 
people; but chances looked good 
that he would become one of 
W&M's more memorable alumni. 




Media/'143 



ANAGING 




harged as the managing a- 
gent for the College's 
publications and radio station, 
the Publications Council had to 
direct the actions of the campus 
media. Moreover, the Council 
sought to accommodate the de- 
sires and opinions of the Col- 
lege's many journalists with 
the College community at large. 
These were no small tasks, and 
indeed departing Chairperson 
Kevin Rossiter claimed that he > 
had "learned a great deal." f 
The Council, comprised of '. 
the respective editors of each 
publication, the president of 
the Society for Collegiate 
Joumalist^M^aualified com- 
munity ^^^Hra|^d selected 
students.TfflB^^pid admini- ^ 
tors, maintained its control 
t the operation of the pub- 
irfc in two specific activ- 
jis. First, after extensive 
applications and interviewSj^h"" 



TOP: As Chairperson of the Publicatio) 
Council, Kevin Rossiter presides over a 
directs all meetings. Ken Smith, ex 
officio member, functions as Secretary. 



ABOVE: Administration members Leon Harold and Heather Meldrum provide student 

Looney and Barbara Ball add their expertise input. 

to the workings of the Council. FAR RIGHT: Editor, George Stukenbroe- 

ABOVE RIGHT: Students such as Rosemary ker, and Maria Fakadej add their opmions. 



144/Publications Council 



THE MEDIA 



Council selected the editor of 
each publication. Second, the 
Council established a budget for 
each publication by examining 
their financial needs and con- 
sidering the relative merit of 
all expenses. The Council's 
duties, however, extended be- 
yond these activities. 

The major concern of the 
Council is that the rights and 
responsibilities of both the 
journalists and the College 
community be maintained. Thus, 
the Council had to insure that 
editors were managing their 
publications with financially 
sound practices. The mission 
of each publication was con- 
•''"ually re-evaluated, espec'-^ 
" ht of the entire C 
sts. Equall 



Publications 



A^STUDE 




ditor George Stukenbroeker 
saw the Flat Hat as essent- 
a student newspaper, "by 

,^^^ [for students." Towards this 

^JJiilll^igoal, News Editor Susan Strong | 
' placed heavy emphasis on those 
Istories which affected the in- 
Iterests of students. In this 
regard, news of world and state 
'-events did not receive coverage 
«,.., except in those cases where such 

events were seen by the editors 
to have a direct impact on stu- 
dents. Editorials focused on 
analyzing important actions and 
decisions within the College 
community which warranted stu- 
dents' concern and consideration ^^ 
and which might have otherwise | 
gone unnoticed. 

In an active attempt to involve 
the College community, Stuken- 
broeker also instituted a student 
and faculty survey as a weekly 
feature. For each issue, a ques- 
tion was asked concerning what 
the editors felt was a caxapuss , , 
problem. The printed! 
invariably provoked r^ 
More so than in any otl 
the Flag Hat operated witl 
full stalf. Stukenbroeker au 
tributed this to the institute 
policy of assigning a story fo 
every person interested|^[ 
ing one. S 

The diversity and "less 1., 
yet more readable style" ol|^ 
Flat Hat made it more attractive 
to student readers. The graphics 
of Arts Editor Cathy Lint served 
to add a new dimension to that 
section of the pa^er. In addi- 
tion, Sports Edit^gPeter Bortner 
and his staff com|tfemented ex- 
tensive sports repeating with 
a new column, "All Sorts of 
Sports." Written by different 
members of the stsrff each week, 
this column consistently ex- 
hibited the unseen and lighter 
side of athletics. 








ll4&The Flat Hat 



mrrhitmi*.iuTm] 




^'T^r^prmvw^ iftCkfJF fl^KJ-TJI HMNI 

ll^^iy^ j^^^jj^ .lAjiiwtj^ Ai. . ii,..<—» ■■ » . . - 



■^^^^^^ *WW^P ^^^WRWr 







w/ /or mcS- pn^i i^yfMii i 



WUKT 




A PERSONACTOUCH 



^illiam and Mary may well 
be in a proce?° "♦" +'°'"''+'" 



3 mx 



as an academic institf 
Will it sustain its 'smi 
lege' atmosphere, or ^ 
inevitably grow into k 
more impersonally-oriented^ 
versity? Editor Leslie Statof 
believes that as computers I 
come of greater importancel, 
new dormitories are constructed " 
to house a growing student popu- 
lation, the traditional/ 

may change. It is witi 
question that the Col\ 
deals. j^ 

Currently, the 'smaf 
atmosphere is maint^; 






pus, and students know| 



5 the faculty and admmistr£| 
ibrs. In order to emphasize 
;his most fundamental aspect 
Ife at William and Mary, Sts 
■■gave special attention to' '" ™ 
"gseople that make up thi 

i Pictures focused nof 1 
^ and empty buildings;- 
sleaH, an effort was madejt^ ^ 
elude and identify as m$^^^g 

" sible in the photos that ^ 

^in the yearbook. Feati 



of 

1 ^ 



isual appeal received heavy 
)hasis, and there were more 
iir photos than in any pre- 
ias year. In addition, Staton 



sncentrated effort to 

help of freshmen in 

on the yearbook. Each 

t who visited the Echo 

ce on Interest Nigh* s 



red a personal le 
d many of these wef 



" -**^f various section editors. 



I§-HT: Long hours, much work, and many 
l&laches are necessary if Jamie Bay- 
%jid Kathi Sitterson are to create an 

^ oliner onH nr-^nrnto Ptoaafa aept.inn 




%f*J^CP 



Gotmell . oompri^ 
espective editors 
publication, the president of 
the Society for Collegiate 
ournalistSt one qualified coin 



in E E I 




Colonial Echo/U9 



"''\>. i.*'*^ 




SOUND AT \A/GiM 



edicated to a philosophy 
suited to and almost re- 
quired of an educational, non- 
commercial FM radio station, 
WCWM maintained its position as 
the only progressive radio sta- 
tion in the Tidewater area. 
Station Manager Matt Zoller ex- 
plained that WCWM had a freedom 
and a mission to provide an 
alternative sound. A commercial 
station is forced to program 
music that will attract the 
greatest number of listeners. 
The result of such programming, 
however, is drah, uniform radio 
which neither challenges nor ed- 
ucates its listeners. A non- ' 
commercial radio station like 
WCWM, freed of such pressure, 
had a duty to provide an in- 
novative alternative for those 
people prepared to go outside the 
bounds of purely popular, Top-40 
music. Towards this goal, WCWM 
provided a wide variety of special 
shows featuring things like 
classical music and bluegrass, in 
addition to regular programming 
aimed at expanding listeners' 
horizdns beyond a core group. ^ » 

WCWSl also continued to bro 
its own horizons. To supplem^i^ 
iming and again 



vide a source of expression for 
alternative views. Megacycles, 
the monthly program guide, fea- 
tured poems and short stories as 
well as program notes. The 
station also made great strides 
in the quality of its sound 
through the purchase of new 
production equipment. Promos, 
station ID's, and other tapes 
made with this equipment were 
sharper and added a great deal 



to the station at large. 

Strides were also made to 
increase WCWM's visibility on 
campus. Live remotes were 
broadcast from the Pub on Fri- 
day nights for the first time. 
In addition. Chief Announcer 
Laurie Huntsman helped direct 
an extensive training program, 
at the end of which all partic- 
ipants passed their FCC Third 
Class license test. 



.lv,\H- 



?i^ 




1 




ABOVE: Station Manager, Matt Zoller, 
foreground, Lindsay Wilson, Laurie 
Huntsman, John Dubel, and Bruce Eels 
form the core of the WCWM staff. 
l^FT: Staff members Judy Plavnick, 
~ Lane, and Paul Roberts create an 
.native sound" for WCWM listeners. 
OSITE PAGE: 

^. Dedicated workers include: BOT- 
TOM ROW, left to right, Patti DeVries, 
Judy Plavnick, Jan Sconyers, Demetra 
Katson, gnd Laurie Huntsman. SECOND 
Schomo, John Debul, Pat Cur- 
lloberts, and Lindsay Wilson. 



■.:iiw. 




_WCWM/151 



REVIE\A/ OF 




Under Editor Denise Goss, 
the William and Mary Review 
underwent fundamental changes in 
its goals and functions. Goss's 
first priority was to transform 
the Review into a nationally 
competitive literary magazine. 
To this end, Goss included the 
works of outside writers in each 
of her two issues. A short story 
by Andre Dubus graced the Fall 
issue, while the Spring issue 
featured the work of College 



Writer-in-Residence Michael Mott. 
Goss also entered the Review in 
a nationwide contest sponsored 
by the CCLM. Steps were taken in 
an attempt to secure a grant 
from the National Endowment for 
the Arts which would fund a spe- 
cial issue built around the theme 
of integrating traditional styles 
with modem ones. 

With its expanded focus, how- 
ever, Goss believed that the 
magazine had become more a part 



of the College community than 
ever before. Although the num- 
ber of issues was reduced from 
three to two, the total number 
of pages was increased, since Goss 
thought it important to have 
"two solid issues." And with 
each issue, student submissions 
increased dramatically. There 
could be no denying that the 
Review was more popular and 
widely-read by students than 
in any year in recent memory. 





ABOVE: Members of the fiction 
board are (bottom row) Andrea Shaw, Aly- 
son Cooper, Gary Holladay, Mary Beth Hen- 
nessey, (top row) Amy Jonak, Diana Nolan, 
Tom Prince, Peanut, and Susan Martinelll. 





ABOVE: Editor Denise Goss cleans up around 
the office. 

RIGHT: In a diligent search for genius, Mark 
Graver, Tom Garson, and Maribeth Phillips 
scan submissions. 



152/William and Mary Review 




'am and Mary Review/153 





A LIAISON 



A publication with an impor- 
tant role in the function 
of the Marshall-Wythe Law School, 
The Colonial Lawyer maintained 
its recent high standards of ex- 
cellence. Editor Cynthia Baskett 
emphasized that although it is 
only published once a year, the 
Lawyer goes beyond a mere annual 
Its distribution to alumni, Bas- 
kett pointed out, was a contribu- 
ting factor in Marshall-Wythe 
having the highest per capita 
alumni donations of any law 
school in the country. This func- 
tion became especially important 
in light of the funding needs 
generated by construction of the 
new law school building. 

"A multi-media magazine," the 
Lawyer published newsworthy arti- 
cles of the yearly activities of 
the many varied law school socie- 
ties. With a staff of fifteen 
law students, Baskett remarked 
that the magazine was produced 
"with a lot of spirit." Baskett 
believed that she had transformed 
it from "an on-again, off-again 
publication for those who can't 
make the Law Review," into some- 
thing that the law school could 
be proud of. Further, the maga- 
zine had "found its niche" as 
a unique liaison between the law 
school and its alumni. 

ABOVE: Mail-sorting is one of the tedious 
parts of the job. 

RIGHT: Weary law students have to find 
the time to study in order to keep 
working on the Lawyer. 

FAR RIGHT: Deadlines can be too h1 
spare the time to look up when posing for 
a picture. 




IM/The Colonial Lawyer 





The Colonial Lawyer/155 



ONE JUMP AHEAD 



There were certain advan- 
tages for George Stuken- 
broeker in being Flat Hat Editor- 
in-Chief in his junior year, ra- 
ther than in his senior year. 
He claims that this position 
made him realize how much really 
went on at William and Mary. Be- 
cause he had to assign, lay-out, 
and proofread many stories on 
the most varied of events, Stu- 
kenbroeker was perhaps in a bet- 
ter position to know about cam- 
pus events than any other stu- 
dent. As a senior next year, 
without the time-consuming du- 
ties of Flat Hat Editor, Stu- 
kenbroeker stated he would 
"take full advantage" of W&M's 
opportunities. 

Still, would Stukenbroeker do 
it again if the chance presented 
itself? His reply was clearly 
in the affirmative; and he claim- 
ed he was "really pleased" with 

RIGHT: Phone calls to verify news tips 
take up a lot of Editor George Stuken- 
broeker's time. 



the job he had done. However, 
this was not to deny the draw- 
backs: "Wednesday and Thursday 
were out — all year!". Furthermore, 
beyond the mental and physical 
exhaustion, Stukenbroeker grou- 
sed that the Flat Hat was dis- 
tracting since it kept him from 
being fully involved in any- 
thing else. 
Stukenbroeker looked forward 



to becoming completely absorbed 
in his studies next year. He ex- 
plained that though his G.P.A. 
had not been affected, he was 
preoccupied such that he "just 
did not learn much." Though a 
history major, he hopes to pur- 
sue journalism professionally. 
Despite the heavy competition 
in the field, he stated that he 
"would give it a try — 1 like it!" 




ISa/Media 






An exotic bird graced 
the studios of WCWM for 
three years in the figure 
of Peter Lane. As a deejay, assis- 
tant music director, and program 
director, Lane contributed 
much to progressive radio in the 
Tidewater area. He created the 
"Weird, Wild, Wacky, Wanton, Won- 
derful WCWM Wangdoodle Contest," 
and described it as "me own lit- 
tle brain-wave." More importantly 
however. Lane was indispensable 
to the station for his spirit. 
He helped to foster, and thrived, 
in the casual, sociable atmos- 
phere of the radio station. 

Born in India, Lane was raised 
in England and came to William 
and Mary on a three-year Draper's 



LEFT: Deejay Peter Lane adds a unique 
touch to the already unusual program- 
ming at WCWM. 

Scholarship. It was in a boarding 
school near London that Lane 
acquired both his extensive mu- 
sical knowledge and easy-going 
attitude. He lived in a dorm 
with over 100 schoolboys, who 
purchased and exchanged 
numerous albums and musical pub- 
lication. And, being near Lon- 
don, Lane saw a lot of rock acts, 
and once "spent a penny" with 
Rick Wakefield. Lane inclu- 
ded many obscure British artists 
in his shows and introduced 
good music to his deejay colleagues 
and listening audience. 

Lane's perspective on W&M was 
influenced by his British up- 
bringing. Students here and in 
U.S. colleges in general are 
too complacent and "are just 
sitting back," in his opinion. 
They do not take "charge" of 
their education and "expand" 
their intellectual horizons. 
The British tutorial system en- 
courages individual work, and 
Lane felt that American educa- 
tors "should open their eyes." 
He added that W&M students were 
too conservative: "They have 
got to learn to jump up and 
down when they're mad." 




IIMFLUEIMCE 



Media. 



Performiing iRrc 



158/Performing Arts 



AN INSIIDIE IL€€II\ 



hose familiar with W&M 
, Theater readily recog- 
nized the figure of Granville 
Scott, senior theater major from 
Richmond. Although Scott admit- 
ted that the theater was one of 
his major interests, he said it 
was definitely not the only one 
and he disliked his categorization 
as "Joe Theater." He came by the 
title naturally, however. Scott 
participated in a dizzying number 
of theater productions in his four 
years at the College. 

In particular, beginning in his 
freshman year, Scott was exten- 
sively involved with Premiere 
Theater in various capacities, 
most recently as playwright of a 
one-act comedy, Buying the Wind, 
produced this fall. He termed the 
experience of actually seeing his 
play performed "interesting." It 
was written last spring for Dr. 
Louis Catron's playwriting class, 
which Scott confessed he took to 
boost his confidence in his writing. 
Although each play written for the 
class undergoes a complex sequence 
of class critiques and reworkings. 
Buying the Wind was well-received 
from its first reading. As play- 
wright, Scott typically had little 
to do with the production of his 
play; in fact, he didn't even real- 
ize it had been chosen until he 
happened to see a poster adver- 
tising the show on campus. Never- 
theless, he was pleased with the 
final performance and the audience 
definitely seemed to concur. 

The concept of a completely stu- 
dent created production at the un- 
dergraduate level is quite unique 



— very few other colleges in the 
country have such a program. The 
opportunity it presents for exper- 
imentation and originality in all 
the intricacies of the theater 
creates a challenging showcase 
for those interested in a theater 
career as well as an exciting ex- 
perience for everyone involved. 

Scott also directed Julie 
Opel's Don't Start the Revolution 
Without Me for the fall Premiere 
show in 1977 and served as tech- 
nical director and lighting de- 
signer respectively for the spring 
shows. But his first love in the 
theater is acting and he consi- 
dered his experience in Premiere 
his freshman year to have been 
invaluable in terms of his subse- 
quent growth as an actor. "One 
of the hallmarks of Premiere is 
its spontaneity," observed Scott. 
"You never know if it's all 
going to come together until you 
get up there and do it." In gen- 
eral, Scott enjoyed every role 
he's played with WMT, although 
he commented that "you can't re- 
ally tell what you've gotten out 
of a role until years later, when 
you can apply it to something else. 
You're too close to it when you're 
involved in it to tell." 

Discussing his approach to 
acting, Scott pointed out that 
more than half the time he spent 
in preparation for a performance 
was spent in the library, not on 
the stage. Extensive research in- 
to the period history and idiosyn- 
cracies of a role is necessary in 
order to play it successfully. 
For Scott, this research was fas- 
cinating and the invitation to 
bring his characters to life on 
stage was an irresistable challenge. 
For example, for his latest role 
as Elyot Chase in Private Lives, 
Scott described his search for an 
Art Deco cigarette holder — the 
small kind, not a large one, 
because people smoked smaller 
cigarettes in the 1930's — and lear- 
ning how to smoke the non-filtered 
kind, tapping the cigarette down 
before lighting it, and so on. 



Seeing Scott on stage, these hours 
of preparation resulted in a perfor- 
mance that appeared poised, refined 
and effortless. His almost uncan- 
ny ability to capture the essence 
of a character's personality 
through language, carriage and 
makeup came into play 
no matter whether he had a major 
role such as the intensely deman- 
ding, creative role of Petey in 
A Birthday Party, or a minor one 
such as the Heavenly Friend in 
Carousel. 

During his senior year, Scott 
limited his involvement with 
WMT because he felt he needed to 
broaden his base of acting exper- 
ience and because, as he laugh- 
ingly put it, "the last four 
roles I've played here have been 
60 year old men and I don't in- 
tend to play another one until I 
am 60." Scott does not neces- 
sarily intend to make his liv- 
ing from theater, however. He 
has no immediate plans after 
graduation and is not too con- 
cerned about it, but is looking 
forward to having time to work 
on various projects and "waiting 
for an opportunity to present 
itself, as I've found they gen- 
erally seem to do." 



GRAlWlELfi SCOTT spends a great deal 
of time preparing for his roles in 
the library, not just on the stage. 



Feature/159 



ll\N€CrilN' €N IHIE^riENjf 




FAR RIGHT: Chris Hux and John Wesley Tay- 
lor execute a perfect "Sailor's Hornpipe." 
ABOVE RIGHT: "June Is Bustin' Out All Over!" 
ABOVE: Carrie (Karen Tolson) and Mr. Snow 
(Hutton Cobb) share a tender moment. 



160/Carousel 



IDCCIP 



T 



he William and Mary Theater 
opened its 53rd season Oct. 
16 with their interpretation of the 
full-scale musical, Carousel, by 
Rodgers and Hammerstein. This par- 
ticular piece was quite an under- 
taking, because of its large cast 
and the fact that it is not a con- 
ventional Broadway musical comedy 
production. But the players handled 
the challenge with style, integra- 
ting the musical and dance features 
effectively and artistically. 

Carousel departs from common 
practice in two respects. It is a 
"sad" musical, the story of a 
smooth-talking carnival barker, 
Billy Bigelow, who marries a local 
factory girl but never really finds 
his niche in life. In desperate 
need of money, he attempts to com- 
mit robbery, then kills himself 
when he is caught, because he can- 



not accept failure. One of the cru- 
cial points of the play, the scene 
at Heaven's back door, also provides 
an unusual twist. Here Billy is 
given one last chance to alleviate 
some of the misery he created for 
his wife and daughter, but only 
after he has learned to stop pla- 
cing himself first and to express 
his love. Granville Scott as the 
Heavenly Friend and Hardwick Spencer 
as the Starkeeper did an excellent 
job of fusing the elements of grav- 
ity, fantasy and comedy necessary 
to make this scene both plausible 
and thoroughly enjoyable. 

Jay McClure created an imposing 
stage presence in the arrogant, 
yet sensitive character of Bigelow. 
His performance of the intricate 
"Soliloquy" was powerful, moving 
the audience to appreciate Billy's 
humanness at an important point 



in the play. As Julie, Denise 
Trogdon delivered a convincing 
portrayal of the devotion and 
loyalty characteristic of Bigel- 
ow's wife. Karen Tolson and Hut- 
ton Cobb both exhibited a strong 
feel for their characters and 
added just the right note of com- 
ic relief to the show, exploiting 
the idiosyncracies of Carrie Pip- 
peridge and her husband, Enoch 
Snow, to the hilt. 

The members of the chorus and 
the dance troupe provided a rich 
accompaniment to the main action 
of the narrative. In particular, 
Margaret Vincent's choreography 
was excellent and the performances 
of "Hornpipe" and "Louise's Ballet' 
captivated the audience, evoking 
feelings ranging from contagious 
enthusiasm to haunting poignancy. 




161 



IL /HIEIDIIEYaVIL CIHiCISTMAVS 



' hen the curtain silently 
V V rose in the darkened PBK 
theater, a drum beat began to drift 
out over the audience. Cymbals 
and pipes added an eerie melody 
line, and seconds later the music 
hushed to a close. Immediately 
a chorus of voices swelled into 
a Gregorian alleluia, while orange 
light slowly illuminated a tor- 
tured mass of bodies upstage cen- 
ter. Finishing the phrase, the 
singers emitted a continuous low 
moan as they writhed within the 
symbolically medieval 'stained 
glass window' shape. A solitary 
aged man slipped simultaneously 
into the spotlight stage right: 
the prophet Isaiah had come among 
men to foretell the birth of 
Jesus Christ. 

The opening scene of the Wil- 
liam and Mary Theater's Medieval 
Plays for Christmas was totally 
arresting. As in the rest of the 
show, designer Christopher Boll's 
dramatic lighting and choreo- 
grapher Shirley Roby's original 
movement made an incalculable 
contribution to the superb visual 
impact of the scene. Medieval 
Plays was a show to watch. The 
magical effect of a backlighted 
scrim for the celestial settings 
was fascinating, especially in 
the angelic host appearances. 
Bambi-Jeanne Stoll's costumes for 
the principals were strong. J.H. 
Bledsoe served as both director 
and scene designer for Medieval 
Plays; his conception of the pa- 
gaent-wagon set stood the product- 
ion in good stead visually and 
dramatically, providing a unified 
base for the partially-fragmented 
individual scenes. 

The integration of the music 
into the show was strikingly 
beautiful. Under the direction 
of senior Hardwick Spencer, the 
musicians mastered exotic period 
instruments such as the krumhorn. 
The singers proved adequate to 
the stiff demands of the vocal 
music. Especially moving was the 



solo piece narrating Joseph's 
search for shelter, sung by Chris 
Hux or Hutton Cobb. 

The performances ran Nov. 30- 
Dec. 3 and a large cast included 
a number of standout performers. 
The strongest scene overall was 
the "Second Shepherds Play." The 
engaging shepherd of Hardwick 
Spencer, along with that of Brian 
Coad, were infectiously fun; while 
Dylan Baker made a flashily crafty 
and amusing Mak. Howie Kelin dom 
inated the Adoration Shepherds 
scene; his impressive physicaliz- 



ation of character captivated 
audiences. Patricia Swanson created 
an appealing character out of the 
challenging role of Mary, parti- 
cularly in early scenes. Richard 
Krohn tackled the dual roles of 
Joseph and Isaiah with success. 

The denouement of the Nativity 
scene was a visually radiant 
Christmas card, allowing the final 
moments of the production to paral- 
lel the opening scenes in picto- 
rial quality. Medieval Plays for 
Christmas was truly a holiday 
treat for the senses. 



162/Medieval Plays 




FAR LEFT: The salutation of Gabriel (hu.- 
ton Cobb) to Mary (Patricia Swanson) heralds 
the conception of Jesus. 

ABOVE RIGHT: The Heavenly Host, led by Gab- 
riel, sing joyously of the birth of Christ. 



mtmi 



Medieval Plays/163 



A SIHATiriElCIEID /HIINID 




TOP LEFT: The life of the lowly army 
barber Woyzeck fBrian Coad) is shaped by 
pompous buffoons like the Captain (Spcss 
Neblett). 

TOP RIGHT: A descent into insanit\- 
brings the broken Wo\'zeck fBrian Coad) 
Literally and figuratively to his knees. 
ABOXT: Like a specimen in a jar. Wos-zeck 
(Brian Coadi submits to the examination 
of the Doctor (Hardwick Spencer) and his 
medical students. 

RIGHT: The polka-dot horse is the main 
attraction of the Ringmaster's (Linda Kas- 
sabian) show. 



l&i/Woyzeck 



I he usual linear plot line 
IB was splintered, shattered 
apart, by Georg Buchner in his 
German Romantic play Woyzeck 
Feb 22-24, the William and Mary 
Theater mounted an ambitious pro- 
duction of the work, an 1830's 
forerunner of the naturalistic 
style of theater popularized over 
half a century later by Ibsen 
and Chekhov. Buchner examines 
under a fine microscope, the 
mind of a man going mad; he 
presents slide after episodic 
slide in almost confusing profu- 
sion. Certainly far ahead of its 
time, the play does lack some of 
the psychological sophistication 
that might have supplied cohesive- 
ness the script could have used. The 
blackout-style of scene shifts 
employed by the WMT show empha- 
sized this problem. It was per- 
haps the only plausible method 
of staging possible, but its 
effectiveness wore thin before 



intermission. 

Bulging, crumbling, and earthy, 
the Woyzeck set design by J. H. 
On Bledsoe enveloped the action like 
a distorted dream. Globular forms, 
rounded edges, and tilting surfa- 
ces made a visually fascinating 
area for the actors to play on, 
especially the symbolically-sug- 
gestive mushroom-like platform 
stage center right. The starkly 
focused lighting design by Chris- 
topher Boll worked with the night- 
marish costumes and special make- 
up (by Lisa Loeb) to create a ra- 
ther expressionistic visual style 
for the production. An intriguing 
and haunting weave of sounds and 
melodies drifted through the pro- 
ceedings and rose like spectres, 
particularly in the second act, 
to fill the viewers with dread. 

Brian Coad was outstanding in 
the title role, managing to over- 
come most script flaws and reveal 
his anguished, disintegrating 



1 






^\ ■■■V^M 



mental condition to spectators. 
Fine physical control and sus- 
tained concentration by Coad made 
his Woyzeck a most sorrowfully 
human creature. The same cannot 
be said for Julie Opel's Marie, 
the only other realistic major 
character, although Buchner's 
script itself allows the part 
little time for motivation and 
believable concentration. 

Woyzeck's world is peopled with 
broadly farcial character types 
who drive the protagonist over 
the edge. Spess Neblett as the 
Captain was an amusingly pompous 
blowhard, while Hardwick Spencer's 
Doctor was a chillingly 
efficient embodiment of bloodless 
science. As seen through the dis- 
eased perception of the figura- 
tively dying Woyzeck, these 
characters, in conjunction with 
the suffocatingly warped envir- 
onment, make the WMT production 
of Buchner's play an inane, in- 
sane hell. 




LEFT: A startled bar patron (Jim Morton) 
is witness to the deterioration of Woy- 
zeck's (Brian Coad) emotional control. 
ABOVE: Penitent too late, Marie (Julie 
Opel) becomes a victim of Woyzeck's 
(Brian Coad) twisted love for her. 



Woyzeck/165 



STILIDIENTS ¥4 



€YIEIR 



"1B~ he yearly performances of 
II Premiere Theater in con- 
nection with Dr. Louis Catron's 
playwriting class present a wide 
range of unique opportunities 
for students interested in every 
aspect of theater production. 
Student talent and creativity 
provide the framework for the 
entire show. This concept of a 
completely student produced pro- 
gram has become very popular since 
its inception several years ago. 
During the fall semester the 



Premiere program included three 
one act plays, presented November 
16-18. A drama entitled "Rhiannon' 
and written by Sheryl Anderson 
started off the evening with a 
flourish. Denise Trogdon directed 
this ambitious piece featuring 
Jay McClure, Grace Springate, 
John Wesley Taylor, Ann Hoyt, 
Linda Rives and Peter King. The 
play was built around the trial 
of Rhiannon, a young girl accused 
of murdering her infant son. 
A swift change of time and 




ABOVE: Two New England fishermen (Steve 
Smith and Greg Adams), engage in subtle 
humor highlighting "Buying the Wind." 
RIGHT: A tense confrontation in a flash- 
back scene of "Rhiannon" takes place. 
FAR RIGHT: "Something Unspoken" explores 
the special working relationship between 
Susan Martin and Ann Husehle. 
ABOVE RIGHT; An amusing comparison is 
made by Beth Stark and Michael Shea in 
"The Footsteps of Doves." 



place presented the slave quar- 
ters on a Georgia farm for Denise 
Trogdon's "Ain't It a White Man's 
World?" Karen Tolson directed 
the tragic drama which explored 
the divergent feelings experienced 
by many slaves between loyalty to 
their masters and hatred of an 
unjust institution which robbed 
them of their freedom and indi- 
viduality. Shannon Turrentine and 
Jim Hansen personified this dichot- 
omy as slaves involved in a doomed 
attempt to escape the cruelty and 
ruthlessness of their soon-to- 
be master, played by James Sher- 
wood Meade. 

The evening ended on a much 
lighter note with Granville 
Scott's "Buying the Wind." 
Sheryl Anderson directed the 
comedy which poked fun at the 
efforts of an overbearing soci- 
ology professor (Budd White) 
to get "authentic" material for 
a book he's working on using two 
New England fishermen, played 
by Steve Smith and Greg Adams. 
The story focused on their dry, 
subtle humor and antics at the 
expense of the gullible professor. 






166/Premiere Theater 



3^ tudents enrolled in the 
P Fine Arts discipline at 
the College experienced a unique 
educational program unlike other 
areas of study. Not only did they 
receive rigorous classroom in- 
struction, but they also planned 
and performed their respective 
crafts for the public. The Thea- 
ter Department was no exception. 
As one of the requisites, stud- 
ents under the direction of Dr. 
Louis Catron, directed, casted 
and produced a play of their 
choice. 

The Director's Workshop is 
somewhat of a proving ground for 
those connected with it. A total 
of seven theatrical vignettes 
were presented this year on Dec. 
4 and 6. Susan Martin and Ann 
Huschle were featured in the 




Tennessee Williams piece, "Some- 
thing Unspoken." Directed by 
Janet Froom, the selection ex- 
plored the special relationship 
between two ladies, one of whom 
was secretary to the wealthier 
other. 

The only comedy piece was "The 
Footsteps of Doves," By Robert 
Anderson. Beth Stark, Lynne Kas- 
sabien, Michael Shea and Tim 
Greiwe comprised the cast directed 
by Laurie Huntsman. The play 
was set in the basement of a bed 
store and concluded in an unex- 
pected turn of events. "The Gol- 
den Axe" by Ralph Scholl was 
offered by Kristen Everly and 
centered around a man's remedy 
for his blocked view of the sun- 
set. Also performed was "Doreen" 
by Alun Owen. Directed by Jim 
Morton, the selection involved a 
clash between male and female egos. 



"Tigers", by Kendrew Lascelles, 
featured Jay McClure and Catherine 
Maxey in the lead roles. Directed 
by Alleyne Dickens, the play is 
filled with heated arguments be- 
tween McClure, the tiger tamer, 
and Maxey, his wife, over the 
death of their son by a tiger. 
Fred Lindstrom offered "Impromptu" 
a piece by Tad Mosel that follows 
in the general pattern of the im- 
provisation genre. Julie Opel di- 
rected the Leonard Molfi play 
"Birdbath", which featured Tim 
Greiwe in the role of a frustra- 
ted writer and Cathy Gartner, a 
waitress he becomes involved with. 



Director's Workshop/i67 




lEIf iriECTJf €lf <64MMaV ICAW 




ABOVE; A dramatic statement is expressed 
by Beatrice (Kathy Barton). 
RIGHT: The careless pose and gesture of 
Barton typifies the character of Beatrice. 
TOP: The simple set relies mainly on 
costuming and characterization to convey 
the atmosphere. 




168/Backdrop 



I J ^^^ Zindel's psychological 
'■"^ drama, The Effect of Gamma 
Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds, 
was the Backdrop Club's selection 
for their 1978 production. This 
demanding play is an intense, com- 
plex study of the conflicting, con- 
fusing emotions involved in the 
universal aging process. The rather 
unusual and intriguing title refers 
to the warped influence of a frus- 
trated, unfulfilled woman, Beatrice, 
on her growing daughters, Ruth and 
Tillie. Just as gamma rays produce 
mutants in marigolds, so Beatrice, 
because she has not been able to 
cope with the unhappiness in her 
own life, has produced offspring 
who are not equipped to face the 
realities of their existences either. 

In probing the discordant per- 
sonalities and psyches in Marigolds, 
Zindel relied more heavily on di- 



verse characterization than on 
action. Director Teri McMahon did 
an excellent job of bringing out 
the idiosyncracies of each character 
and their interreactions, which is 
the essence of the play. As the 
embittered Beatrice, Kathy Barton 
handled the challenging task of 
portraying middle age very effec- 
tively. She was quite adept at 
translating the inner motives be- 
hind Beatrice's attempts to mold 
her daughters into images of her- 
self into her external gestures 
and poses, as well as through the 
lines of the script. 

Purposely, Zindel showed the 
daughters as mere caricatures of 
whole beings as a result of their 
mother's oppressive dominance. 
Becky Ritter's performance as the 
introverted Tillie was impeccable. 
Possibly a genius, Tillie retreated 



into her own world, bounded by the 
concerns of her pursuit of science, 
to escape the actualities of her 
environment, and Ritter makes the 
most of small gestures and facial 
expressions to convey this. Juxta- 
posed with Tillie's shy, timid man- 
ner, Susan Furey as Ruth projected 
the image of childishness and cruel- 
ty without intellect through flam- 
boyant, exaggerated gesticulation 
to point up the deliberate contrast 
between the sisters. 

Technically, the set was simple, 
but striking, relying mainly on 
costuming and a general cluttered 
effect to convey the personalities 
and the environment the play exp- 
lored. All the aspects of Marigolds 
were integrated well and the pro- 
duction as a whole was an impres- 
sive interpretation of a difficult 
drama. 




ABOVE: A distraught Tillie (Becky Ritter) 

is comforted by Kathy Barton and Susan Furey. 



Backdrop/169 



OPPOSITE PAGE: 

TOP: The Dragoon Guards step out in 

precise formation. 

LOWER RIGHT: Lady Jane (Laurie Gescheider) 

and Angela (Lynn Pasteris) share sorrows. 





TOP: Bunthome (Jay McCIure) woos Patience : 
(Cathy Sentman). 

BOTTOM: All the village maidens love Bun- 
thome (Jay McClure) and his "poetry." 



170/Sinfonicron 




AicT rcip AiRT'jf s Air; IE 



11 he adage, "it's not what you 
IHsay, but how you say it" 
sums up the attitude behind the idea 
of art for art's sake and the aes- 
thetic movement of the late 19th 
century satirized by Gilbert and 
Sullivan's Patience. Whisking the 
audience back to the world of Os- 
car Wilde, the student-run Sinfo- 
nicron Opera Company presented a 
highly energized version of this 
farcical operetta Feb. 1,2,3. 

The satire focused primarily on 
the themes of unrequited love and 
people who seek to imitate art. 
The contrast posed between the 
ostentatious aesthetic Reginald 
Bunthome and the rigid, precise 
Dragoon Guards in their competi- 
tion for the affections of the 
twenty lovesick maidens provided 
a good deal of the outrageously 
comic moments of the play. Jay 
McClure as Bunthorne came through 
with a consistently superior per- 
formance, capturing the essence 
of the opportunistic poet and 
maintaining good rapport with the 
audience. Particularly in the 
second act, the Dragoon trio of 
the Colonel (Carl Meyer), the Duke 



(Hutton Cobb) and the Major (Step- 
hen Collier) were delightful in 
their attempts to imitate Bun- 
thome's ridiculous posturing in 
order to regain the maiden's favor. 

Throughout the play, G&S ex- 
plored the human propensity to fol- 
low the latest fad with a tongue- 
in-cheek irony tempered by com- 
edy. Director-choreographer Lisa 
Sagolla did a fine job of coor- 
dinating both of these elements 
through simple, effective design, 
especially with the village maid- 
ens and the Dragoon Guards. The 
opening number, "Twenty Lovesick 
Maidens We" skillfully set the 
tone for the silly affectations 
of the maidens who blindly follow 
the lead of Lady Angela, played by 
Lynn Pasteris. All, that is, ex- 
cept Lady Jane, the buxom senior 
maiden. Laurie Gesheider charmed 
the audience with her zany antics, 
lightening the stinging satire. 

In excellent counterpoint with 
the rapturous maidens, Cathy Sent- 
man gave a captivating touch to 
the earthy practicality of Patience, 
the village milkmaid. Ironically, 
she is the only girl Bunthorne 



loves, and the only one who does 
not care for him. But Patience 
eventually falls under the spell 
of love's magic, personified by 
Archibald Grosvenor (Paul Cohill). 
Unlike Bunthorne, Grosvenor is a 
true aesthetic and poet. Cohill 
was quite adept at portraying a 
convincing Fauntleroy character. 




Sinfonicron/171 




WELL ON HER WAY to an international ca 
reer, Juliana Markova appears as guest 
pianist with the Richmond Symphony 




m) n September 28, the 
l_y W&M Concert Series 
opened with an impressive per- 
formance by vioUnist Miriam 
Fried and pianist Garrick Ohls- 
son. It was truly a joint re- 
cital; each of the three sonatas 
offered were well-coordinated 
to display the talents of both 
musicians, not just the violin- 
ist with piano accompaniment 
as is so often the case. The 
highlight of the evening was 
Beethoven's "Sonata in E Flat", 
which contained many imitative, 
conversational passages between 
piano and violin. 

The modem, innovative Ohio 
Ballet transcended the rules of 
conventional ballet movement to 
achieve a smooth, unified phras- 
ing responding to the music and 
the dancers' dynamic exchanges 
in their superb performance on 
November 7. The company presen- 
ted four pieces, utilizing both 
duets and group numbers and em- 
phasizing the group as an inte- 
grated whole, without particular 
stars. 

Jack Jarrett's "Romeo and Jul- 
iet" was first on the program in 



the Richmond Symphony's appear- 
ance on November 14. The sym- 
phony delivered a characteris- 
tically polished concert accen- 
tuated by the dramatic solo 
pianist, Juliana Markova, join- 
ing them for Grieg's "Piano 
Concerto in A Minor". 

One of the top quartets in the 
country, the Julliard String 
Quartet presented an outstanding 
Beethoven program exhibiting 
their individual and collective 
virtuosities in Phi Beta Kappa 
Hall on January 25. The concert 
emphasized the ensemble's abil- 
ities to blend the parts into a 
sweeping tour de force, even 
when each player was playing a 
different phrase, as in the 
"Quartet in A Minor, Opus 132." 

Also included in the 1978-79 
Concert Series season was Music 
from Marlboro and the Gregg 
Smith Singers. The instrument- 
alist group TASHI, well-known 
for exciting, unusual per- 
formances including a wide var- 
iety of music from all periods 
and often performing with guest 
artists, concluded the series on 
April 2. 



172/Concert Series 




ClLILirtlCAIL IPCTIP'OLIPIPI 




ABOVE: Violinist Miriam Fried and pia- 
nist Garrick Ohlsson combine to create 
a dynamic weaving of intricate melodies. 



Concert Series/173 




I he College-Community Orch- 
IBestra forged an important 
cultural link over the years be- 
tween the transient members of 
the College community and the 
residents of the Williamsburg 
area. Comprised of 60 students 
and one faculty member, plus 15 
musicians from the surrounding 
Peninsula area, the Orchestra 
fulfilled a number of mutual 



needs for the College and the com- 
munity as a whole. Since there 
were not enough student musicians 
at William and Mary to form a 
complete College orchestra or 
enough talented, interested lo- 
cal residents to form a profes- 
sional group in the community, 
the combination of student and 
resident players was a prof- 
itable one for both participants 






4'^ , ^ 

E acbompanifis t6£ "Che 



A BRASS ENSEMBLE aFcompanifis t&e "Cho* 
Fanfare for Christmas" at the Winter Con- 



and audiences. The Orchestra 
thus offered a unique outlet for 
many talented amateurs to par- 
ticipate in public performances. 

Directed by Dora Short, the 
Orchestra had a strenuous sched- 
ule this year, beginning fall 
semester with a combined Christ- 
mas performance with the College 
Choir. During the spring semes- 
ter, the group gave a concert at 
Virginia Wesleyan College on Feb. 
25, as well as their annual 
Spring Concert on April 25. 
Highlighting the Spring Concert 
was Mozart's "Requiem", a joint 
performance with the Choir. 

The spirit of unity and enthu- 
siasm among the members of the 
Orchestra was an integral ingred- 
ient of its performances. Each 
member was challenged to fulfill 
his potential as a musician, 
gaining satisfaction from per- 
sonal success while adding to 
the success of the entire per- 
formance. Watching the Orches- 
tra in concert, it was evident 
that the members thoroughly en- 
joyed what they were doing. 
Perhaps this was the secret of 
their success. 



174/Orchestra 



jfl ombining freshman and up- 
^_y perclass women for rehearsals 
each week and three formal 
performances, the William and 
Mary Chorus proved to be a pop- 
ular outlet for many talented 
singers again this year. Their 
first performance was the tradi- 
tional Christmas Concert, direc- 
ted by Frank Lendrim and held in 
conjunction with the Choir Dec. 
2-4. Christmas almost wouldn't 
be Christmas in Williamsburg with- 
out this popular concert to her- 
ald the festivities of the holi- 
day season. This year the pro- 
gram featured soloists Valerie 
Fisher, Stacy Puis and Susan Bar- 
ley and a string ensemble accom- 
panying the "Magnificat" by Nic- 
cola Porpora. As a finale, the 
Chorus and the Choir sang a joint 
"Choral Fanfare for Christmas", 



accompanied by a brass ensemble. 
Unfortunately, the ever-present 
Williamsburg rain prevented the 
group from their traditional car- 
oling after the program. 

On Feb. 22, the Chorus gave a 
special concert at Bruton Parish 
Church. The candlelight program 
included a select group of pieces 
chosen for the occasion, among 
them were the popular "Magnificat" 
and a modern musical interpreta- 
tion by Randall Thompson of Rob- 
ert Frost's "Come In". 

The year concluded for the 
Chorus with the annual Spring 
Concert on April 20-21. High- 
lighting the evening was the in- 
tricate, beautiful "Stabat Mater" 
written by Baroque composer G.B. 
Pergolesi and a collection of 
four William Blake poems scored 
by contemporary composer K. Korte. 




' C€/H1E T€GIETIHIEIP 




Chorus/175 



J^' 


^ 






w 






,:- 


f ^■ 













i 


i 


^ 


^ 


r ^ m 






W 


ii 1 


p 


% 


' , 






1 


11^ 






m 


■^ 


ii 


1 




i 


3 


THE BOTETOURT CHAMBER SINGERS offer spe- 
cial concerts as an ensemble during the 
year, as well as performing with the rest 
of the Choir. 


1 


i 






i ■■' 



TiniE CinCllC IDIEIOILTS 



II J eturning from a summer tour 
m<. in Europe, the W&M 
Choir brought their fame and ta- 
lent back to WiUiamsburg for a 
busy and successful year. 

In the fall the choir travel- 
led to Virginia Beach to sing 
at a benefit for the Campaign 
for the College; traditional e- 
vents included the Occasion for 
the Arts, a Christmas Concert 
with the Chorus, and the Yule 
Log Ceremony. 

Second semester, the group 
planned a Spring Concert with 
the Chorus, featuring a Mass by 
Francis Poulenc. Unable to re- 
sist the travelling spirit, the 
choir toured New York, New Jersey, 
Pennsylvania and Virginia. A 
special feature this spring was 



a joint performance of Mozart's 
"Requiem" by the Choir and Orches- 
tra. 

The Botetourt Chamber Singers, 
a select ensemble within the 
choir, kept in tune with a per- 
formance at the State Governor's 
Convention in Williamsburg among 
others. 

The highlight of the Choir's 
calendar was their part in the 
Perry Como Christmas Special. 
The actual filming for the show 
was done in Williamsburg the 
first weekend in November, which 
turned out to be unseasonably 
warm, unfortunately for the win- 
ter atmosphere the show was in- 
tended to convey. The filming 
and vocal taping were done sep- 
arately, which meant a great 



deal of time and effort for the 
members of the Choir, especially 
when the filming schedule was 
typically four hours behind. 
Looking back, however, they 
laughed about the delays and 
the manipulations of the Holly- 
wood film men, admitting that 
the experience was fun — and one 
they would never forget. 

During the final airing on 
December 13, the Choir feared 
their segments had been cut. 
However, the best seemed to 
have been saved for last, and 
the group appeared in the final 
moments, featuring the men of 
the Choir in a tavern scene and 
the entire assemblage in Bruton 
Parish Church for a beautiful 
rendition of "Ave Maria". 



176/Choir 



/•'5*» ja^ wf^ 






< 






m ■■■'■ 








^ 


#. 


1 


5^ 


^,k V^ ff^f 


t¥^ 


'*' '^m 


4 




•^ ft 1 


La 


i-'l 


rj 


Kv Jjt' 


^■^^H^B^ ^^^^^^^^H 


CHRISTMAS is also the season 
as the members of the 1978-79 o 
tion <vl^ at their festive cone 


r 

for choirs 
rganiza- 
ert. 


i 


^9- 


t 







CN SIltyiElP SCICIE 




THE CHOIR makes appearances at both Char- 
ter Day and its student supported count- 
erpart on February 10. 



Choir/177 





FAR RIGHT: The band performs a 
precision drill under the direction 
of Mr. Charles Varner. 
RIGHT: Intense faces concentrate on 
coordinating music and footwork. 





178/Band 




aVNID TIHIE IEANID IPILaVW <on 



M n the fall, the marching 
II band provided entertain- 
ment during halftime at all 
four football games at Gary 
field. The band performed 
precision drills to a wide 
range of popular tunes, from the 
current hit "Feels So Good" 
to "That's Entertainment", 
featured at the Homecoming 
game. The Sunken Gardens 
resounded with music three 
afternoons a week as band 
members perfected their 
footwork in preparation for 
their performances. As well 
as playing at home games, the 
band also travelled to two 
away games, against Navy in 



Annapolis and against the 
University of Richmond. 
After football season was 
over, keeping up spirit at 
home basketball games was the 
special task of the volunteer 
corps of band members who made 
up the pep band. 

Second semester, band members 
concentrated their efforts on 
concert material. While 
perfecting their co-ordination 
and technique, the band was 
divided into brass, woodwind, 
and percussion sectionals for 
intensive practice, in addition 
to regular rehearsals together 
as a group. On March 30, the 
achievements of the semester 



were presented at the spring 
concert in Phi Beta Kappa Hall. 
The following weekend, April 
6-8, the band took a performing 
tour to New York, doing a show 
Friday night on the way up and 
one on Saturday night. 

For many students, being in 
the band offered a unique 
opportunity to meet a lot of 
people with a common interest 
in music, to get musical expe- 
rience, and to travel. The long 
hours of practice seemed to most 
to be offset by rewards of 
friendships, trips and pride in 
performance. 



Band/179 




I he accent was on athletic 
IB skill combined with cre- 
ative flair for Mermettes this 
year as they prepared for their 
annual spring performance and 
national competition. The theme 
of the show performed last March 
29-31 was "That's Watertain- 
ment!", featuring eleven origi- 
nal compositions which all 
received qualifying ratings 
for the national competition. 
This year there are twelve 
new members in the group under 
the enthusiastic sponsorship of 
Marcia Milbraith. During five 
workouts a week, members par- 
ticipate in sessions on con- 
ditioning, perfecting old 



skills and learning new ones. 
Tryouts are held early in the 
fall and practice sessions are 
held all year for various 
regional and state competi- 
tions and symposiums in pre- 
paration for Nationals in the 
spring. These festivals in- 
clude workshops, which provide 
excellent opportunities for 
the members of the group to 
share ideas and skills with 
similar clubs from 
different parts of the 
country. 

Mermettes is primarily a 
performing group affiliated 
with the National Institute of 
Creative Aquatics. All members 



participate in choreographing 
the individual numbers to di- 
verse musical selections, com- 
bining swimming skill and 
strength with the artistry of 
modern dance. They put in 
many hours in the pool to 
bring their compositions up to 
performance level. William and 
Mary Mermettes were well-repre- 
sented in the select group of 
compositions chosen for public 
performance at the national 
competition last April, captur- 
ing two out of ten spots. The 
group is expected to maintain 
this fine performance level 
this year. 





WATIEIRTaVINMIENT 7/3 



ABOVE LEFT: Mermette swimmers this year 
include: Janis Gibbs, Tammy Vance, 
Moira Holly, Linda Hill, Anne Stephan and 
Charlotte Sharp. 

FAR LEFT: A sideways sailboat formation 
highlights a 1978 composition. 
LEFT: With ballet legs gracefully 
extended upward, five Mermettes exhibit 
a standard technique. 

ABOVE: Tammy Vance and Keith Havens, 
entrants in the national composition, 
practice a duet in Adair pool. 



Mermettes/lSl 




182/Orchesis 



^ 



/SL s a modern dance company, 
'^^ the members of Orchesis 
were primarily concerned with 
creative personal expression 
and with fostering interest in 
modern dance as an art form 
in the college community. To- 
ward this aim, much of the 
year was spent in extensive 
preparations for the spring 
performance, "An Evening of 
Dance", held March 24, 25, and 
26 on the main stage of Phi 
Beta Kappa Hall. The group 
began meeting early in the 
fall to refine and coordinate 
their skills. Spontaneity and 
innovation were the keynotes of 
these practice sessions, where 
the dancers separated into small 
groups to extemporaneously 
design short dances based on a 
given theme or idea. In addi- 
tion to regular classes and 
rehearsals under sponsors Carol 
Sherman and Shirley Roby, 
several times during the year 
Orchesis students had the 
opportunity to attend master 
classes taught by visiting 
professionals to broaden their 
knowledge of various dance 
skills and techniques. 

Choreography for the "March 
program was the original 
creation of individual students 
within the troupe, and audi- 
tions were held to cast each 
number. The performance 
presented a harmonious arrange- 
ment of diverse compositions 
which reflected the expressive 
sensibilities of both the 
choreographers and the dancers. 

The March program represented 
the summation of the Orchesis 
dancers' efforts throughout 
the entire year. It was an 
accomplished display of 
artistic self-expression 
through the unique medium of 
modern dance. 



It^lEIElP €N IDANCINe 



.ABOVE LEFT: Lighting effects create a 

mood to complement an original Orchesis 

composition. 

BELOW LEFT: Lisa Sagolla and Doug 

Barton portray a moment of dramatic 

sensitivity. 



ABOVE: Orchesis president Karen 
Simmons strikes a classic pose. 



Orchesis/183 



BOTTOM RIGHT: Tom Scholz creates 
an avalanche of rushing sound. 
BOTTOM LEFT: "It's a party!" belts 
out Brad Delp, lead vocalist of Boston. 



OPPOSITE PAGE, BOTTOM: A highly 
energized Sammy Hagar in mid-flight. 
BELOW: Little Feat displays their im- 
provisatory ability in "Day at the Dog 
Races." 




184/Concerts 




II n addition to the academic 
■ integrity that is firmly 
entrenched in Williamsburg, a 
cultural universe also exists. 
Since their inception a decade 
ago, rock concerts have provided 
a further buttress to the liberal 
academia in this community. 

Welcoming us back to the grinds 
of another year. Little Feat in- 
itiated the 1978-79 concert sea- 
son with their brand of kicking 
rock, jazz, blues fusion. The 
performance was topped off by 
such rockers as, "Day at the Dog 
Races", "Oh Atlanta", and "Dixie 
Chicken" and featured The Feat 
in a transitional role from cult 
to a more universal status as a 
group. Supporting The Feat on 
the bill were The Kaz-FuUer 
Band, a musical hybrid of Amer- 
ican Flyer, Pure Prairie League 
and Virginia's own Sweet Breeze, 
Robbin Thompson. 

The "Guitar Army" rode into 
town Homecoming Weekend when the 
Outlaws appeared at the Hall. 
Abundantly supplied, the Outlaws 
tapped their musical arsenal and 
fired up such blazing tunes as 
"Water Hole", "Hurry Sundown", 
"There Goes Another Love Song" 
and the monumental "Green Grass 
and High Tides". The redneck 
rocking sounds of The New Riders 
of the Purple Sage proved to be 
an energizing catalyst for the 
evening's show. 

Following a historical premier 
tour and a long awaited second 
LP, The College welcomed back a 
rock legacy, Boston. The Boys 
from Beantown delivered a stun- 
ning display of guitar wizardry 
that embellished their edifice 
of musical stratification. 
For openers, veteran rocker 
Sammy Hagar injected the aud- 
ience with a solid dose of 
rock and roll. 



MCKE TIHAN A If lEIEILING 



Concerts/185 



1 



y^H> 



r.^*-# 



ia 



^m^ 



186/Concerts 



n his first major tour 

with Crazy Horse since 

1975, Neil Young delivered one 
of the most electrifying per- 
formances the College has ex- 
perienced. He injected the 
Hall with a forceful dose of 
rock and roll that still rings 
in the hearts and ears of the 
near-capacity crowd. 

Young is probably one of 
the most enigmatic performers 
of the last decade. He has 
survived turbulent romances, 
break-ups with Buffalo Spring- 
field and Crosby, Stills, Nash 
and a barrage of attacks from 
the critics regarding his 
musical endeavors. Undoubt- 



edly, Young is one of the 
most misunderstood musical 
forces today and he prefers 
it that way. 

The elaborate and well- 
maneuvered staging and 
lighting are embodiments of 
Young's insatiable drive to 
be unique as well as his in- 
curable cynicism. Young is 
not an extremist, but exag- 
gerations are more appealing 
than mundane reality, such as 
stage hands dressed as Jawas, 
sound men with white lab coats, 
cone heads at the mixing 
boards, excerpts from the 
Woodstock festival, oversized 
replicas of vintage Fender 



•i| ••• * 



amplifiers, and a towering 
Electro-voice microphone. 
Perhaps Young feels dwarfed by 
the musical behemoth of which 
he is a part. 

The concert got underway as 
Young emerged from within a 
casing that covered a gigantic 
amplifier. Wired for sound. 
Young traversed the stage much 
like a troubador while per- 
forming such acoustic classics 
as "Sugar Mountain," "I am a 
Child," and "After the Gold- 
rush." 

The bulk of material focused 
on Young's musical involvement 
with Crazy Horse. Taking the 
audience on a journey through 
the past, Young offered "The 
Loner," "When You Dance" and 
Cinnamon Girl." His most 



recent work with Crazy Horse 
featured "Come on Baby Let's 
Go Downtown" and two dramatic 
numbers "Like a Hurricane" and 
"Cortez the Killer." Young 
closed the set with a chilling 
anthem that eulogized the drug- 
related deaths of former 
cronies Bruce Berry and Danny 
Whitten. 

Neil Young is no longer the 
political activist who fills 
the verses of "Ohio." He is 
an aging rocker fixated and 
obsessed with the dread of 
getting older. Although "rust 
never sleeps" and "it is better 
to burn out than to fade away," 
Young does offer some hope in 
his sea of madness: "My, my, 
hey, hey — Rock 'n' Roll is 
here to stay. Hey, hey, my, 
my— Rock 'n' Roll will never 
die." 

FAR LEFT: Perched on his stool, 
Young moves with ease through a well- 
paced acoustic set. 
UPPER LEFT: A fine sampling of 
Young's instrumental versatility is mani- 
fested in his autobiographical "After the 
Goldrush". 

CENTER: Frank Sampedro, Billy 
Talbot, and Ralph Molina comprise 
Young's faithful back-up band, Crazy 



ii^ONieiiiirs Time Niiemr 




188/Greeks 



open Rush Policy Works 





The focal point of Rush 
1978 was awareness. The 
Panhellenic Council, with the 
cooperation of all nine soror- 
ities, tried to inform each 
rushee of the academic, finan- 
cial, and time obligations in- 
volved in joining a sorority. 
This theme began early with a 
revision of the Greek Herald 
newspaper, sent to rushees in 
July. Prior to Rush Week, a 
reception for all rushees was 
held, with all of the Panhel 
delegates available to answer 
questions. 

Rushees responded well in 
this open atmosphere. An 
astounding number of 467 wo- 
men went through formal rush. 
Of these, 190 were upperclass 
women. This was due to Fall 
Rush, since "many women wait a 
year to make their choice," re- 
ported Debbie Hodge. Fall 
Rush will be kept on campus, 
through a 5-4 vote of the soro- 
rities. And the rushees did 
not seem to mind. As one 
freshman pledge exclaimed, 
"That early week of Rush adds 
to the fun and excitement of 
sorority life!" 

Due to the increasing 
number of women part- 
icipating in Rush each year, 
investigation of the possibility 
of inviting a new sorority on 
campus was instigated. Although 
the trend towards even greater 
numbers in Rush continued, it 
remains to be seen whether the 
Greek system at William and 
Mary can accommodate a tenth 
sorority. 

UPPER LEFT: Excited pledges gather on 

Richmond Road to rush across the street 

and join their new sisters on Acceptance 

Day. 

LOWER LEFT: Rushees anxiously await 

invitations to return to their favorite 

sorority. 



Rush/189 



I 

M 



The goal of the IFC this 
year was to make it a more 
functional organization. As 
always, their primary concern 
was to regulate rush functions, 
keeping fairness as the top 
priority. 

But this year, the group ex- 
panded its efforts by sponsor- 
ing a dance for the benefit of 
the American Cancer Society. 
They hoped to make it an annual 
event. "The power and resour- 
ces available to the IFC are 
tremendous," emphasized Social 
Chairman Ed Gormley. "This 
year we just put them to use." 
Another event on the calendar 
was a dance for all Greeks to 
promote unity in the fraternity- 
sorority system. The Greek 
Games in the spring are always 
a favorite on campus, as they 
were again this year. 

By encouraging each member of 
each fraternity to attend the 
IFC meetings. President Al Ham- 
maker hoped to "show the variety 
of things the council could 
achieve" if the fraternities 
provided strong backing. To- 
gether, they demanded better 
maintenance by the College for 
fraternity housing and succeeded. 
By banding together, the IFC and 
the fraternities at large showed 
that they could be a viable 
and valuable organization on 
the campus. 

TOP: Social Chairman Ed Gormley 
sets up mixers for a dance. 
CENTER: Competition between frater- 
nities flourishes during weekly intra- 
mural football games. 

LEFT TO RIGHT: First fiou— Bob Gaudian, Doug Hut- 
che-son. David McClure, Mike Zupan. Chad Perrine. 
Second Sou — Pete Farie], Jeff Wright, Steve Smith. 
Pete Ashooh, Keith Baldarz. Third ftou— Tom Mor- 
ris. Waily Kramer. Scott Walode. President Al 
Hammaker, Ed Gormley. Bill Childs. 





190Anter-Fraternity Council 




In the Year of the College, 
sponsored by Campaign for 
the College, the Panhellenic 
Council worked to make a major 
contribution to the school, 
through participation in the 
Phonathon. A contest between 
the sororities was organized, 
with cash prizes for the group 
who raised the most money while 
phoning alumni. Many 
other volunteers such as fra- 
ternity men, were brought in 
by Panhellenic members to help 
in their efforts. 

Work was not all Panhel did. 
They sponsored a Fashion Show, 
with the cooperation of Binn's 
department store, that was a 
huge success. A lasagna din- 
ner was held each semester for 
Greek women, as well as an 
ice cream party in the Sunken 
Gardens. 

Ever-concerned with new 
pledges, Panhel re-evaluated i 
Big Sister Clue week. In an 
effort to halt "hazing," they 
deemed it necessary to pro- 
hibit clues from being given 
in the Caf, the Library or 
in CW. 

And in keeping with the top 
priority of all sororities, 
academics, Panhel increased 
the scholarships distributed 
annually. This year they 
awarded one campus-wide 
scholarship of $200, and three 
$100 gifts to Greek women. 

Panhel worked constantly to 
improve the Greek system, both 
within sororities and in the 
eyes of the community. This 
year, they succeeded at both. 

TOP: Panhel President Mary Hay greets 
Greek women at the semi-annual lasagna 
dinner. 

LEFT TO RIGHT: Fml Row-Susan Rappe, Beth Faber, 
Second Jiou— Belh Bowen. Ellen White. Mary Hay. Kare 
Frost. Third Ron — Kathy Dallon. .Amy Restuccia. 
Robin King. Ann Brubacher. Carol Freedman. 



u 

i 

S 

f 



Panhellenic Council/191 



Alpha Chi Wilts Again 




SAILORS Lisa Eddy, Nora Bentley and 
Patti Murray pose for rushees. 

LEFT TO RIGHT: First Row— Page Taylor, Gloria Simp 
son, Sandra Cox, Helen Rodgers, Nora Bentley, 
Cheryl Newman. Ellen Quigley. Pattie DeVries. Cind\ 
Reid, Linda Anderson. Alicia Lawton, Debbie Hammond 
Sharon Jacobs. Second Rou — Martha Maerker, Zohreh 
Kazemi. Sue O'Laughlin, Sue Snediker, Robin Ander 
son, Becky Walker, Patti Murray, Lisa Eddy, Valerie 
Hayes, Marjie Beck. Fran Jenkins. Third Row — 
Virginia Seggerman, Jill Saueracker, Dede Atkinson, 
Cathy Wolford, Maile Mclntyre, Pat Buchanan, Mar- 
garet Witten. Beth Slonaker. Cindy Suhr, Kathy 
Stephan. Chris Weiler. Fourth flou— Donna Hollar, 
Suzanne Doggett, Shih-Shing Shih, Karen Hazelgrove, 
Ruth Cupery. Naomi Okinaka, Carol Morris, Jennifer 
Newell, Nancy Ackerman. Cindy Happell. Fifth Row- 
Susan Marks, Janet Cratsley, Lynn Murphy, Anna 
Blackweli, Annette Lawson, Sarah Hassell, Paula 
Mainte, Cheryl Miante. Kathy Dalton, Karen San- 
delbach. Sixth Row— EWen Pearson. Patti Faini. 
Margaret Stiles, Charlotte Emans. Lisa Weathersbee. 
Margaret Bond. Beth Ann Walk. Terri McElligott. 
Seventh fiou— Cathy Welsh. Kathy Burke. Debbie Wil- 
liams, Carol Hoechner. Karen White, Mary Beth Me- 
Caleb, Cynthia Weber, Carol Johnson, Cathy Lubin, 
Becky Damton, Marie Cruz, Lauren Daly. Eighth 
row — Sherry Forester, Debby Smith. Sally Wolfe. 
Barb Duffy. Carol Habich, Kathy Setzer, Diane 
Dreyer. Karen Newbun.', Marg Gregg, Becky McCoy, 
Connie Johann. Judv Goertz. Martha Schirmer. 




192/Alpha Chi Omega 



Alpha Chi Omega started 
out their year of suc- 
cess by winning the Homecom- 
ing Float Contest with the 
slogan "Shirley we will lick 
the Dukes" from The Good Ship 
Lollipop. To add to that 
eventful day, Marjie Beck, 
their president, was named 
Senior Princess. Again a 
winner, the Alpha Chi's cap- 
tured second place in the 
Derby Day fund-raising event 
by selling doughnuts door-to- 
door. They held their own 
fund-raising projects too, 
including a Bowlathon in 
November, the benefits of 
which went to the Cystic 
Fibrosis Foundation, and 
their annual Christmas Party 
for the Williamsburg Day 
Care Center. 

Parties are always a favor- 
ite of Alpha Chi, and this 
year proved to be no excep- 
tion. The sisters hosted 
social events for the law 
students, the MBA fellows, 
and for many of the frater- 
nities on campus. They honored 
the alumni of the sorority 
with a reception after Home- 
coming. The ever-popular 
annual pledge dance acclaimed 
their "best pledge class ever," 
said Alpha Chi's rush chair- 
man. 

Altogether, the sorority 
participated zealously in many 
community and college affairs. 
Several sisters ushered for 
plays held in PBK, and many 
participated in the Phonathon 
in the Campaign for the Col- 
lege. Alpha Chi's spirit and 
unity rode high once agam. 

UPPER RIGHT: Margaret Witten plans to 
"hook" new members for the sorority. 
MIDDLE: Alpha Chi's show high spirits at 
Greek Night at the Pub. 
RIGHT: Winnie-the-Pooh Debby Smith and 
friends Marjie Beck and Lynn Murphy laugh 
at their own costumes. 




Alpha Chi Omega/193 



Chi O Holds Highest GPA 



The goal Chi Omega set for 
this year was to make com- 
mittees and the chapter members 
more involved in the workings of 
the sorority. A major effort to 
attain this goal was made in 
their Officers' Training Weekend 
in Virginia Beach, at the sugges- 
tion of their national head- 
quarters. 

And the Chi O's did get invol- 
ved. They sponsored a Blood 
Drive for the Red Cross, held a 
Halloween Party for kids at 
Eastern State, collected Toys 
for Tots, made decorations for 
trays at Pines Nursing Home, 
and adopted a grandparent. 

Many social events, as well as 
philanthropic parties, were held 
by Chi 0. They had a country 
Halloween party with Theta Delt, 
a New Year's Eve Party with 
Sigma Chi, and won 3rd place in 
Derby Day competition. Their 
pledge dance in honor of 31 new 
Chi O's was a favorite of first 
semester, as was the pledge/ 
senior slumber party. Many oth- 
er parties with fraternities 
and sororities brought out en- 
thusiastic sisters all year! 

Academics were always stressed 
by Chi 0, and they succeeded 
again. A scholarship dinner 
for the ten most improved mem- 
bers was great incentive, as 
was a faculty reception. 
Their work paid off — they 
proudly discovered they held 
the highest GPA among sorori- 
ties on campus! 

TOP: Roma Huk, Margaret Bostancic, 
and Mary Louise Scott entertain rushees 
with their singing. 

BOTTOM: "Oscar" Cindy Raczenbek 
peers from her Sesame Street hiding place. 




194/Chi Omega 




LEFT: Barbara Abbott gets a bird's eye 
view of Derby Day. 
ABOVE: Sisters in House giggle to- 
gether over a favorite TV show. 



Chi Omega/19.5 



rAAA 




TOP: Sherri Jennings, Patti Pritchard, 
Mary Ann Heyser, and Sandy Rogers do a 
Delta skit from the fifties. 
LEFT: Dinner has Carol Petchul 
puzzled. 

RIGHT: Friends of "Dorothy" Karen 
Quigg, Sally Harwood, and Robin Ailstock 
gather in the Land of Oz. 



196/Delta Delta Delta 




BOTTOM: Rowdy sisters Kathy Yankovich and 
Joni Beck enact a scene from Animal House. 



LEFT TO RIGHT: FIRST fiOW-Liz Rivell. SECOND ROW— 
Patti Pritchard, Betav Moore. THIRD fiOVV— Sandy Rog- 
ers. Rena Pope. Ann Higgenbotham. FOURTH fiOlV— Jane 
Clemmcr. Carol Petchul. Betsy Schier. Linda Layne. 
FIFTH ROW— Kathy Yankovich, Robin Ailstoclt, Mary Ann 
Heyser, Robin Hunter. Sherri Jennings, Kathy Lawlor, 
Mary Ann Springer. SIXTH ROW— Andy Chin, Carol Bova, 
Denise George. Nancy Breedlove. Cindy Barwiclt, Katie 
Williams, Marie Buchwalter. Bobbie Tullah. SEVENTH 
ROW— Gail Yeager. Julie McDowell. Sarah Moses. Alice 
Cline. Diane Herkness. Mvra Boles. Susan Startt. Dot 
Suter. Mary Bey Sanford. EIGHTH ROW: Karen Vandercastle, Debbie 
Gioia, Lisa Blanock, Ann Reardon, Holly Teeter, Kathy 
Miller, Becky Noreiko, Patty Germain. Daryl Wedding, 
Pam Snidow, Shannon Turentine, Susan Cory, Cindi 
Hughes. Ardith Myers. NINTH fiOVC-Katie Winter. Caro- 
line Jones. Patti Brown, Kim Lesher. Liz Edwards, 
Jewel Purdy. Andrea Kent. Cathy Chapman. Lori Mer- 
ish. Patty James. Sally Harwood, Amy Little. Teresa 
Martin, Kathy Toussaint, Stacv Puis. Kathy Quigley. 
TENTH ROW— Jenny Wauford. Cecelia Jackson. Karen 
Stipp, Karen Frost. Julia Duffy. Helen Panos. Pam 
Rhodes, Candy Simmering, Molly Ashby, Janet Boyce, 
Mary O'Neil, Natalie Moser, Michelle Trainer. Jenny 
Lascara, Karen Slezak. Sally Prillaman. 



This was a special year for 
the Tri-Delts, as they 
marked their 50th Anniversary on 
campus. They celebrated in 
style by holding a brunch in the 
Campus Center. Among the guests 
were three members of the origi- 
nal class, who told their ver- 
sion of Delta Delta Delta life. 

This golden glow carried on 
throughout the year in the many 
Tri-Delt activities. Derby Day 
was well-remembered, since they 
won 2nd place overall and ran 
after many Sigma Chi's to win 
1st place in the Derby Chase. 
Other favorite events were the 
toga party with law students, 
the Polynesian party at Theta 
Delt, receptions for freshmen 
men, sororities, and grad stu- 
dents. And a "special" pledge 
dance was held at the Sheraton. 

Philanthropies were not 
excluded either. The sorority 
gave away their annual $500 
scholarship to a W&M coed, 
serenaded the patients at Pines 
Nursing Home with Christmas 
carols, and danced in a Rock-a- 
thon for Derby Day. 

Lastly, Tri-Delt worked to 
achieve chapter unity. Pletreats 
were a major aid, since the 
fall retreat was used to assimi- 
late pledges into the sorority, 
and the spring retreat in Surry 
to help in officer training. 
The Tri-Delts always enjoyed 
just getting together with 
their sisters. 



Tri-Delt Celebrates 50tli 



Delta Delta Delta/197 



BELOW: Birdie Hariston pauses between 

dances to chat. 

RIGHT: Beth Trip smiles brightly at her 

disco partner. 

BOTTOM: Happy onlookers Helen Davenport, 

Denise Murrell and Phyllis Terrell enjoy 

party. 




198/Delta Sigma Theta 



Delta^s Rejuveitate in ^78 





Delta Sigma Theta was a 
public service sorority, 
using any funds they raised for 
the benefit of the community. 
They strove this year to work 
on the five basic national 
points: mental health, econo- 
mic development, housing and 
urban development, community and 
international development, and 
education. The principal bene- 
ficiary of these efforts this 
year was the Williamsburg Day 
Care Center, for which they held 
parties, provided tutors, and 
general support. The Mu Upsilon 
Chapter held a disco dance, 
which earned about $200 for 
the center. 

Since last spring's pledge 
class brought in seven new 
members, the Delta's were re- 
classified as an active chapter 
on campus. A house was the 
major problem of the year, since 
the sorority had no regular 
meeting place. They hoped to 
get on-campus housing, perhaps 
near sorority court, by the end 
of the year. In the spring, 
a new pledge class was presented, 
as Mu Upsilon hoped to add to 
the 95,000 national members. 
This year, they contributed over 
$100 to the Endowed Chair, a 
national fund for a Negro col- 
lege professorship. 

Although the Delta's worked 
hard, they partied, too, show- 
ing their dancing skills in 
their final gala Spring Block 
Show. 

TOP; Caught in the act, Pat Pollard and 
Kim Wilson grin happily. 
BOTTOM: Delta's Patricia Pollard, Denise 
Murrell, Kim Willis and Beth Tripp dis- 
cuss housing. 



Delta Sigma Theta/199 



^4. 



{Sisters Go Cave-ing 



j»M 





HUMAN PUPPETS Patty Birch and Karen 
Creekmore have their strings pulled 
during rush. 

MSJMPa 




LEFT TO RIGHT: FIRST ROW— Kathie Lee Dixon. Donna 
Dockery, Pam Gould. Tammy Holder, Suzanne Eagle, 
Cathy Goewey. SECOND flOW— Susan Bobb. Gaye Overton 
Angela Ottobre, Emily Yowell. Karen Creekmore, Caro- 
lyn Lavne. Marv St. I'homas, Peegy Stephens, Ellen 
Hopper, Janette Hanson, Cindv Heldt. Jane Glenn, 
Rhonda Harris. Nancy Nowicki. THIRD ROW— Meg Don- 
nelly, Karen Fioramonti, Cathy Jones, Carol Freed- 
man, Carol Todd, Patti Birch, Sue Berrv, Anita 
Pearce. Leslie Sokol. FOURTH flOW— Gretchen Smith, 
Judy Kenny, Marv Lou Martin, Su Lovegren, Marv 
Brennan, Natalie Edholm, Jeanne Stolcis, Diane Mc- 
Donald, Leslie Barry, Ann O'Connell, Karen Besch- 
erer, Kathy Bruen. FIFTH flOW-Sue Wilkin. Lisa Mc- 
Daniels, Jeri Daniels, Tami Blosser, Jenny Lunday, 
Kris Huntley. Anne Brubacher, Janet McGee, Molly 
Bilodeau. SIXTH ROW— Fran Hunt, Carolyn Schwulst, 
Gayle Leinberry, Rae Haltiwanger, Barb Straight. 
Anne Colony, M. B. Leaf, Mary Lee Bateman, Nancy Fah- 
ey. Holly Trester. Susan Prince, Carrie Camp, 
Margaret Littlejohn. 




200/Gamma Phi Beta 




LEFT: Rae Haltiwanger and Molly Bilo- 
deau enjoy the presence of Ebony. 
BOTTOM: Big sister hunt is a stringy mess 
for Angela Ottobre, Janet McGee, Nancy No- 
wicki and Sioux Prince. 



s 



pontaneous spirit was 
remembered of Gamma Phi 
in '78-'79. The group won the 
Spirit Award at Homecoming, 
and took first place in the 
Derby Day competition. 

With great pride, the group 
received their national McCor- 
mack Award for the third time. 
This award was for the Most 
Active Chapter, signifying that 
more girls were involved in 
more campus activities than 
any other Gamma Phi chapter in 
the nation. As well as having 
a member on almost every wo- 
men's varsity sports team, 
Gamma Phi had members on the 
Debate Team, in ODK and in 
theatre. The spirit and di- 
versity of Gamma Phi's was 
shared, too, as they set an 
example for sisters when 
hosting the area leadership 
conference. 

After all these outside ac- 
tivities, the Gamma Phi's loved 
to get together. They made 
care packages for the children 
of their national philanthropy, 
and went on retreats each 
semester just to have a chance 
to be together and have a good 
time. But the favorite 
meeting place of the girls seemed 
to be the Cave. After many 
meetings or events like ini- 
tiation, Gamma Phi's congregated 
at Ton's for drinking beer 
and dancing, from which many 
parties spontaneously evolved. 



Gamma Phi Beta/201 



BELOW: Pat Clock "hits" Mary Hay in a 

spirited game of backgammon. 

RIGHT: Sue Trawicki and Lelia Kelly dress 

as friends of Christopher Robin. 

BOTTOM: The grand finale convinced many 

rushees to join the "Beautiful Intangible." 




Theta Pies iSigma Chi 



202/Kappa Alpha Theta 




■KAG 



Kappa Alpha Theta will long 
remember this as the year 
that Derby Day and their pledge 
dance fell on the same day. As 
one sister put it, "we forgot 
about trying to win awards and 
just tried to survive and enjoy 
it." The good nature of the 
Thetas carried them through the 
day with smiles, however. Other 
"craziness" of the year included 
the pre-Derby Day Pie-a-Sigma 
Chi fundraising event, and a 
wild Halloween costume party 
with guests like an IRA sniper, 
"2 wild and crazy guys" and a 
nameless male in a grass skirt! 

They opened the year with a 
party with Theta Delt to honor 
pledges, a time of wild thumper 
games for the entire group. And 
the spirited Thetas won a keg 
for a banner supporting the In- 
dians during football season. 
Besides all the parties and 
dances, though, Thetas brought 
home seven 4.0 GPA's first 
semester. 

The Thetas were very proud of 
their group of 25 pledges this 
year. Although they t.p.'d the 
house, they learned to join their 
sisters in the motto, "Beautiful 
Intangible." A retreat in the 
country gave sisters a restful 
chance to keep their special 
spirit and love alive. And ro- 
mance brought Thetas even closer 
together, as they shared many 
candlelights over the year. 

TOP LEFT: "Consider Yourself at Home" is 
sung by Marika Miller, Chris Zvosec, 
Brenda Peacock, Liz Lynn and Meg Weeks. 

LEFT TO RIGHT: FIRST ROW-Lhuts Rhodes, Marcie Wa 
Nancv Podger. Helen Greifer. SECOND flOW— Rosemarv 
Harold, ,Janet WiUson, Beckv Hartneld, Liz Tufts, 
Judy Habicht, Sue Hammerland, Cheryl Lang, Kathy 
Steckelberg, Pat Vaughan, Susan Varker, Carol Long, 
est, Brenda Peacock, THIRD fiOW— Elaine Hilsee, Law 
son Cox, Paula Fehnel, Sue Ellen Abernathv, Meg 
Weeks, Teddy Bryan, Sue Trawicki, Carol Miles, Va- 
; Bettendqrf, Kay Wjison, Martha Stanley, Sheryt 



Mellott, Gail Halstead, Karen Leyden, Karen Haley, 
Carol Christensen, Kathy Jones, Connie Wilson, Kim 
Skellv, Ginger Eagles, Corey Giesecke, Amy Taylor, 
Susan Loguc, Mary Ellen Shields, Beth Pepper, Judy 
Plavnick, Lisa Wolf, Beverly Carson, Nancy Briggs, 
Mary Hay, Pat Clock, Lisa Long, Lelia Kelly, Temple 
Burke. Debbie Adlis, Margaret McCorraack, Janet Jor- 
gensen, Becky Miller, 



Kappa Alpha Theta/203 




^^^^ peration sisterhood" ap- 
^_^ peared to be the theme 
of Kappa Deltas this year. Nor- 
mally a title for a pledge-in- 
doctrination retreat, this phrase 
captured the essence of KD. 

This same proud group of sis- 
ters celebrated their 50th anni- 
versary on campus this fall. A 
host of banquets and speakers 
punctuated the event. Both the 
KD National President and 8 of 
the original founders were pre- 
sent for the gala affair. 

The KD's extended the warmth 
of their sisterhood to those 
outside the sorority, too. 
Their "Breakfast in Bed" sale 
netted a nice sum for Derby Day 
and the Crippled Children's Hos- 
pital of Richmond benefited 
from the 3rd Annual Sadie Haw- 
kins Dance at the pub. The 
Senior Citizens of the United 
Methodist Church and the KD's, 
too, enjoyed the new Wednesday 
Lunch Bunch program. 

Sisters joined together for 
social events as well. A fa- 
vorite of first semester was a 
50's party with Theta Delt. A 
parents' reception and the pledge 
dance were other popular events 
of the fall. Second semester 
brought many afternoon keg par- 
ties, including guests like the 
MBA students into the newly re- 
decorated Kappa Delta House. 
The group wound up the spring 
with a Beach Week at Nagshead. 

From Derby Day to White Rose 
Week to the Spring Pledge Dance 
the KD's continued "operating" 
with togetherness and sisterhood. 

ABOVE RIGHT: "Little Orphan Robin" 
King welcomes a rest during rush. 

LEFT TO RIGHT; FIRST flOW-Linda Miller, Cindy Wea- 
ver, Suzanne Coffman, Michelle Dickereon, SECOND 
flow— Jeirie Varrone, Susan Line, Claire Walton, 
Cathy Hartsog. THIRD flOW— Vivian Schmidt, Shawn 
LaRue, Amy Restuccia, Ellie DiGiorgio. FOURTH ROW- 
MI Walton, Carol Charles, Anita Bolick, Gina 
Clayton. FIFTH flOW— Cynthia Floyd, Martha Rhyne, 
Judy Alley. SIXTH fiOW— Lora Jacobsen, Robbie Bai- 
ley, Rayna Kneuper, Becca Peabody. SEVENTH ROW— Sat 
Prock, Megan Lott, Amy Cooper, Becky Slayton, Betsv 
Marlin. EIGHTH flOW-Dawn Ehlenfeldt, Karla Kraynak, 
Debbie Bennett, Judy Starr, Barb Schwenke, Karen 
Budd, Kathleen Overbv, Lisa Loeb, Natalie Haugh. 
NINTH flOH'— Robin King, Jeanne Wilson, Laura Almy, 
Kathy Martin, Patty Swanson. TENTH ROW— Ann Cross- 




204/Kappa Delta 



LEFT: Eagerly-awaited pledge dance pic- 
tures are surveyed by Kathleen Overby and 
Natalie Haugh. 

BOTTOM: Princesses Kathy Martin and Che- 
ryl Morris charm rushees with their smiles. 
BELOW: Sisters Jerrie Varrone 
and Ann Rickerich enjoy sharing an 
evening of TV together. 




c-jJiSf.. '.^U,. 



Siisterhoocl Reigns At KD 



Kappa Delta/205 




LEFT TO RIGHT: FIRST ROW— Kris Winegar. Ann Mors 
Laura Wortman, Diann Dodd. Debbie Brand, Teri 
Browning. SECOND ROW— Terri Hamlin, Lalla Shish- 
kevish, Kris Orrico, Sandy Roberson, Beckv Riddle, 
Ceci Warrick. THIRD ROW— Beth Faber, Patti Brock- 
well, Kathy Smith, Lynn Pasteris. Evelyn Gates, 
Lori Nordseth. FOURTH ROW— Nancy Trbovich. Susan 
Rappe, Mindy McCauley, Elizabeth Sim, Amy Kennedy, 
FIFTH ROW— Sus&n Pickett, Kate Howe, Edleen Paw- 
lowski, Leslie Casson. Steph Jones, Bevin Engman. 
Maureen Larkin, Lynn Lieder, Ann Hagan, Carol Ar- 
nold. SIXTH ROW—B&Th Busch, Brooke Trible, Lynne 
Hirschman, Kim Smith. Jean Bradley, Donna Eccard, 
Cindy Turner. Cindy Peroe. SEVENTH ROW— Sharry 
Stumm, Mary Sue Busser, Caroline Bolte, Linda Bre- 
see, Nancv Shelton, Steph Buchanan, EIGHTH ROW— 
Susan Newell, Barbara Cole. Julie Wheeler, Trudy 
Reeves. Sue Struckell, Cathy Welch. NINTH ROW— 
Diane Ratchford, Beth Turbyfill, Karen Przypyszny, 
Laurie McAvov, Linda Swantz. Linda Skapars, Lvnn 
Russell, Ann Husted. TENTH ROW— Kate Knott. Linda 
Kiisk. Missy Wright. Betsy Foumier, Terri 
Jacoby, Jenny Youngdahl. 



,^-~x 






FH 


■• - \ 




■■^t 


IBS 


S5 


p^ - 


NJB 


^» 


■"^-^if'%^ 


"^''lp« 


'kIJ^- 


I i w 


'^ m 




r3 


?*^r^ w- f 


«!** 












* •""of whipped creai 


^"^ 




lis team 




206/Kappa Kappa Gamma 



^4 



Kappas Fit Tour Fancy 



^ 




The closely knit group of 
Kappa Kappa Gammas 
worked this year to share that 
closeness with others. A good 
opportunity arose when they were 
invited to host seven sister 
chapters for a province meeting 
in March. Banquets, workshops 
and parties were filled with 
Kappas sharing. Another honor 
came their way — the Fit Your 
Fancy vocal group was chosen to 
tape KKG songs and send these 
tapes all over the country to 
share with their sisters. 

The Kappa Gammas were in- 
volved in many activities all 
over campus this year. Among 
their ranks were several Phi 
Beta Kappas, Mortar Board and 
ODK members, theatre partici- 
pants, Honor Council members, and 
President's Aides. 

This all made for lively con- 
versation when the girls met 
at the house, preferably in 
front of the new TV, where 
many episodes of "Mork and 
Mindy" were enjoyed. Kappas 
partied with other groups, too, 
even travelling to Hampden- 
Sydney to host a rush party for 
the Theta Chi's. Fraternities 
on campus were welcomed at the 
house, too, usually with a keg. 
Cookouts, study breaks, happy 
hours, and game parties were 
all popular as Kappas reached 
out to those on campus. 

But Kappas had to beware; 
their friends always heard of 
their activities in "Hoots 
and Salutes" offered at every 
meeting, which were times to 
remember. 

TOP: Pirates Beth TurbyfiU and Teri 

Browning laughingly commandeer attention 

at a rush party. 

MIDDLE: The Happers, Patti Brockwell. 

Lynn Nichols, Lalla Shishkevish, Nancy 

Trbovich and Edleen Pawlowski rehearse 

a new skit. 

BOTTOM: President Nancy Trbovich leads 

"The Freeze" during Derby Night at the 

Pub. 



Kappa Kappa Gamma/207 



Phi Mil Takes 8 Awards 




TOP: LEFT TO RIGHT: FIRST flOW— Debbie Lam. Beth 
Layne. Beth Meade, Sue Arnot, Patti Saari, Bonnie 
Pobiner, Mary Gottwald. Helen Hayes, Ellen C, 
Mary Beth Hennessey, Sue Warren, Lori Matthews. 
SECOND ROW^Julie Findley, Cindy Darling, Lou Anne 
Charters, Mary DeVore, Anne Fitzgerald, Joann Jones, 
Debbie Robertson, Linda Riley, Gwyn Hambley, Shj 
King. THIRD ROW— Sue Townsend, Terri Leftwich, Kin 
Morrison, Debbie Jewell, Jan Pickerel, Marilyn Blank, 
Pat Pazoga, Rani Pinch, Parrie Quick, Dori Phillips, 
Marci Anzmann, Debbie Sides, Cindy Friedheim, Kelly 
Shea, Laurie Searls, Bonnie Lemon, Barb Jingo. 
FOURTH KOW— Carol Coates, Janice Scussel. Trisha 
Young, Jennifer Cooper. Beth Bishop, Liz Rothberg, 
Liz Williams, Lisa Russell, Debbie Fitzgerald, 
Linda Davis, FIFTH ROW-Nancy Bartlett, Beth Keen, 
Sue Eisenhauer, Jo Ellen Coates, Audrey Pinkham, 
Julie Crooks. Dede Mullane, Sandra Thomas, Nancy Mul 
lin. Carol Humphries, Chris Wieland, Rosemary Hales, 
Robin Patty. Suzanne Scholte, Marcia Seymour. SIXTH 
ROW— Mary Glenn Mutter, Susan Motley, Kathy Johnsc 
Lela Early. Veronica Terry, Laura Fisher, Ellen 
White, Lynne Whitmarsh, Mary Sue Magee, Donna Lom 
bardo, Virginia Lee, Lisa Swickley, Roseanne Ondar- 
za, Kellie Fleming. 



208/Phi Mu 




Phi Mu, a sorority of 
"individuals working to- 
gether" carried off eight of 
their national convention awards 
including the Most Improved 
Chapter, Best Pledge Program, 
Best Newsletter, and National 
Chapter of the (fall) Quarter. 
With a start like that, they 
had to have a great year. A 
newly redecorated house wel- 
comed a new class of Phi's in 
the fall. Parents' Weekend 
filled the house to overflowing. 

The girls of the sorority 
joined forces to create a Hal- 
loween Party for the adoles- 
cents at Eastern State, and 
"kidnapped" all the fraternity 
presidents, then sent the 
ransom to the Sigma Chis for 
Derby Day. They trick or 
treated all over campus to col- 
lect money for Project Hope, 
the Phi Mu national philanthro- 
py. And many study hours paid 
off — nine Phi Mu's brought home 
4.0 grade averages first semes- 
ter. 

But the girls did plenty of 
partying, too. A champagne party 
with Theta Delt was hosted in 
honor of the pledges. Phi Mu 
collaborated with Sig Ep for 
a great grain punch party. And 
a favorite of all the girls was 
the secret admirer's party, held 
in February. Christmas parties. 
Pledge dances, Initiation cele- 
bration at the "Dirty Delly", 
Senior Banquet, and Beach Week 
were other memorable occasions 
for the Phi Mu's. 

TOP: A "family" of Phi Mu's, Debbie Jewell, 

Yukiko Yamashita, and Margaret Willson 

leave for spring retreat. 

LEFT: The entertainer on the bar is 

Barb Jingo, performing for rushees. 



OM-^ 



Phi Mu/209 



Pi Phi Wins Phouathoii 



The characteristic spirit 
of Pi Phi shone through 
all of 1978-79. This enthusias- 
tic spirit enabled them to chat 
their way to 1st place in the 
Panhellenic-sponsored Phonathon, 
reaping over $10,000 for the Col- 
lege. Other beneficiaries of 
Pi Phi good will included UNICEF, 
The Firemen's Auxiliary Fund, 
and Toys for Tots. A favorite 
with the girls was a Christmas 
party for the adolescents at 
Eastern State, co-sponsored by 
Sigma Nu. 

More spirited first prizes were 
gathered as Pi Phi won the WRA 
swimming events, and Lorraine 
Minetree proved to be the cham- 
pion of the intramural tennis 
competition. 

Parties and dances, however, 
were the favorite places for 
Pi Phi vivacity to emerge. The 
Formal Pledge Dance in November 
brought a host of new "angels," 
and in April they teamed up with 
the Kappas for Monmouth Duo at 
the Lodge. Keg parties with 
fraternities and sororities 
brought the Pi Beta Phi's out in 
full force both semesters. And 
food was always enjoyed, as evi- 
denced by the Founders' Day Din- 
ner at the Parish House in CW, 
the Thanksgiving Dinner in the 
Campus Center ballroom, a wine 
and cheese reception for the 
faculty, and a Mother-Daughter 
Banquet in the Spring. 

Rush workshop. Senior Banquet, 
and Beach Week brought a spark- 
ling end to an animated Pi Phi 
year. 

LEFT TO RIGHT: FIRST fiOW— Byrdic Johnson. Joan Fa- 
brizio. Page Farley, Melissa Larson, Muffy Oakley, 
Beth McMath, Chris Smith, Lisa Cross, Janine Reter, 
Debbie Hodge, Jane Gresham, Judy Mahaffev, Nancy 
Antle, Debbie Bishop, Charlotte Sharp. SECOND ROW— 
Evy Lowenstern, Pam Pritchard. Beth Wallmeyer, Cindy 
Reid, Dana Disque, Cathy McMenamin, Jay Morris, 



Susan Slater, Laurie Karlson, Julie Brink, Patrice 
Duggan, Nancy Hart Diehl, Alice Campbell, Kathleen 
Wieland, Susie Callison, Mary Havden, Lee Green- 
eisen, Nancy Tammi, Liz Harrison. FOURTH fiOH'— Sandra 
Harton, Beth Forbes, Kim Pine, Patty Lank, Celia 
Cumiskey, Sharon Bowen, Ann Gordon, Jan Howarth, 
Rebecca Lewis, Jan Bovd, Lisa Best, Janet Peucker, 
Donna Hume. FIFTH flOW— Margaret Findlay. Sarah 
Baird, Jenny Tatnall, Beth Morrison, Beth Scott, 
Suzanne Sellers, Nancy Conlon, Brenda Henry. SIXTH 
flOlV— Lily Bailey, Carrie Solomon, Bonnie Newton. Pam 
Westbrooke, Robin Emery, Leisa Charlton, Kim Poland. 
SEVENTH flow— Cindy Johnston, Jill Pegram, Nancv 
Sharp, Pam Stickel, Ann Benton, Debbie Hill, Nancy 
Graham, Carolyn Rasmussen, Lee Ann Foster, Judy 
Howard, 




210/Pi Beta Phi 




OPPOSITE, TOP: Spirited Pi Phi's Jane 
Gresham, Beth McMath, Mary Sue Estes and 
Mary-Paula Bailey cheer for rush. 
TOP: Heartthrobs Laraine Minetree and 
Janine Reter wait for prom dates. 
LEFT: Muffy Oakley and Amy Edgerton 
show rushees what Beach Week is all about. 
ABOVE: A pending exam finds Judy Maha- 
ffey and Pam Spicer in deep discussion. 



Pi Beta Phi/211 



Alphas Face Challenge 




FAR ABOVE: Brothers Albert Herring 
and Shawn Keyes toast a rushee. 
ABOVE: At a BSO meeting, Shawn 
Keyes makes his point. 
RIGHT: President Connie Swiner con- 
templates a proposal for a new service 
project. 



Community service is one of 
our main objects," stated 
Alpha Phi Alpha Vice-President 
Roger Bailey. Remaining true to 
this creed, the Alpha Phi Alphas 
dedicated themselves to serving 
the College and community this 
year. Brothers sponsored Hallo- 
ween and Christmas parties at 
Eastern State, and conducted a 
tutoring service for students at 
Lafayette High School and Berk- 
eley Elementary. In addition, 
the fraternity held a raffle for 
the American Heart Association 
and participated in a national ■ 
fund drive for the NAACP. 

The Alphas kept pace in their 
social schedule, holding a month- 
ly disco dance in the Campus 
Center and periodic Games nights. 
In the spring, the brothers got 
together for the annual Black 
and Gold Ball. 

Alpha Phi Alpha was faced 
with the unique challenge of 
having all its members init- 
iated just the year before, 
having graduated all but the 
pledge class in 1977. Bailey 
remarked that it was an exciting 
challenge, giving the brothers 
many possibilities. "We're 
really starting out fresh, and 
we're trying to become more 
familiar on the campus." 

Increasing membership was a 
major goal of this year, and 
Alpha hoped to pledge ten men 
in the spring. Smokers, in- 
formal sessions, and the an- 
nual freshman dinner in Sep- 
tember comprised the rush 
agenda. Enlarging the size of the 
fraternity will be a continuing 
effort, according to Bailey. 

Long range plans for the 
fraternity included remaining 
active on campus and looking 
for housing. Bailey summed 
up, "As Alpha grows, it will 
increase our visibility and 
give us the leverage we need 
to get things done." 



212/Alpha Phi Alpha 



LEFT; A fall dinner for prospective 

members finds Albert Herring taking care 

of details. 

BELOW: Rush parties and smokers give the 

Alpha's the opportunity to meet with 

freshmen. 




A0A 



Alpha Phi Alpha/213 



KAs Eager For Future 



214/Kappa Alpha 



Eager is about as good a 
word as any to describe 
the Kappa Alpha Fraternity," 
said President Imrie Bowman. 
"We are not content to just 
sit back; we want to make things 
happen with the fraternity and 
on campus." 

"Things" began to happen in 
October during Homecoming Week- 
end. Bloody Marys and screw- 
drivers provided early morn- 
ing refreshment for those com- 
pleting the "Camelot" float. 
The evening closed with an 
annual reception and dance for 
returning alumni. 

Other fall events included a 
taco party for brothers and a 
60's revival party. Completing 
the fall calendar was the year- 
ly Christmas party where bro- 
thers exchanged stories and 
"gifts" in the Yuletide holiday 
spirit. 

The traditional "Old South 
Week" provided the highlight 
of the spring's activities. 
The events of the week in- 
cluded the Iron-Man Drinking 
contest, installation of new 
officers, and the Senior Ban- 
quet. The culmination of the 
week was the Southern Ball, 
followed by a beach weekend at 
Nag's Head. 

KA's philanthropic efforts 
resulted in donations to their 
national charity, the Muscular 
Dystrophy Foundation. Money 
was raised by the raffle of a dinner 
for two at the Williamsburg Inn. 
This fund-raising event was so 
successful that the KA's hoped 
to make it an annual project. 

A primary concern for the 
immediate future was increased 
membership and greater vis- 
ibility on campus gained from 
projects such as the MD raffle. 
A strong pledge class in the 
spring fulfilled the rush goals 
set for this year, and KA plan- 
ned to continue meeting the 
goals they set for themselves, 
while maintaining close ties 
and having good times within 
the brotherhood. 




LEFT: Dave Hickey enjoys racking up free 
games of pinball. 

BELOW: Kennard Neal and Mark Reed demon- 
strate the technique of winning air hockey. 

LEFT TO RIGHT: FIRST RU W-Brian Easton, John Red- 
mond, Tom Beers, Charlie Strain, Rick Ramsey, Dave 
Cheek, Kennard Neal, Dave Krantz. SECOND ROW-Tom 
Morris, Barry Billet, Steve Woessner, Charlie 
Kolakowski, Tim Manuel, Mark Reed, Tommy Vaughan, 
Pete Carrazone. THIRD ROW— Doug Koval, Scott 
Summers, Bob Rothacker. Glenn Dennis, Todd Rhodes, 
Res Ware, Imrie Bowman, Kaz Sparrow. FOURTH ROW— 
Dave Hickey, Chip Henry, Dave Renz, Mike Chase, 
Jeff Thompson, Phil Kain. 




Kappa Alpha/215 



Kappa !Sigs Work & Play 




FAR ABOVE: Brothers clown around the 
house on a slow afternoon. 
ABOVE: Beer and hay at the barnyard 
smoker provide entertainment for Joe 
Manderfield, Biff Wittkamp, and 
Steve Bartnicki. 
RIGHT: In preparation for the 
college championship game, Steve 
Fimian and Brett Bettge scrim- 
mage in a football practice. 

OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP: The morning 

paper is an object of interest to 

Rob Olson and Mike Mason, who check out 

the Redskins score. 

MIDDLE: Pinball becomes a spectator 

sport as brothers watch Bob Aitken 

play an intense game. 






216/Kappa Sigma 




Kappa Sigma fraternity 
made a "team effort" this 
year, according to President 
Jon Horovitz. In what he termed 
a "very competitive" rush year, 
Kappa Sig strove to "build up" the 
fraternity, which had lost many 
graduating seniors, by seeking 
new members who would take an 
active and responsible role 
within the house. 

Kappa Sig stressed the close- 
ness that they attained by work- 
ing as well as partying toge- 
ther. Brothers painted and re- 
panelled their party room and 
replaced furniture in the liv- 
ing room. Fund raisers re- 
sulted in monetary donations 
to the John Kratzer Memorial 
Fund. 

Socially, the brothers began 
the year with an open bar re- 
ception and band party for 
alumni during Homecoming Week- 
end. The traditional casino 
and barnyard smokers remained 
a favorite and successful part 
of their rush. Members clad in 
white overalls continued to 
display spirit at the Indians' 
basketball games. Early in 
the spring, the rising of the 
sun cued the brothers to begin 
drinking at their Sunrise 
Cocktail Party. Other spring 
festivities included the sweet- 
heart dance and a weekend at 
Myrtle Beach. 

The Sigs fielded strong in- 
tramural teams; the fraternity 
placed first in the college- 
wide football competition. 
Thus, the year proved to be one 
of both "work and play" as brothers 
strengthened their organization 
in all aspects. 



LEFT TO RIGHT: FIRST flOW— Mike Jenkins. .Joe Mander- 
field, Mike Mason. .Jon Horovitz. Ken Cloud, Mike 
Brown. SECOND ROW— Brian Dalton, Steve Ball. Bob 
Aitken, Dale Gamer. Mark Mulladv, Tom Simmons. 
Scott McDonnell. Bob Rash. Bobby Young. THIRD 
flow— Dave Haas, Billy Harrington. Paul Hoffman, 
Milt Drewcr, Bo Short, Roy Phillips, Karl 
Sprague, Brian Denny, Bruce McFarlin. FOURTH 
i?OW— Mike Wagner. Bill Ruppersberger. Keith 
Hendrick, Jimmy Dinardo, Rob Olson. Rich Lundvall 
Dave Greeley, Steve McHenry, Mike Blackburn. 
Chris Durham, Biff Wittkamp. 




Kappa Sigma/217 



Diversity proved to be a 
key component of the phil- 
osophy of the Lambda Chi Alpha 
brotherhood. The fraternity 
sought a pledge class of "open- 
minded" individuals capable of 
appreciating and respecting the 
uniqueness of their brothers. 

According to President Dave 
Evans, each individual was given 
the opportunity to accept re- 
sponsibility by working on 
various committees while also 
enjoying an active social life. 
The fraternity goal of "doing 
more" with others on campus re- 
sulted in a band party at the 
Pub co-sponsored by Kappa 
Sig and Sigma Nu. 

Traditional fall activities 
included a homecoming recept- 
tion and band party, a bon- 
fire at Yorktown, pre-basket- 
ball game cocktail hours, and 
a formal on the last night of 
classes. The spring was a busy 
time with the Big Brother-Lit- 
tle Brother football game, and 
beach weekend at Nag's Head. 

Lambda Chi overcame the ob- 
stacle imposed by the fire last 
spring by working on major 
house improvements. Brothers 
made redecorating decisions 
over the summer; new carpet- 
ing was purchased for the 
living room and chapter room. 
The furniture and stereo equip- 
ment which were destroyed in 
the fire were also replaced. 
Insurance money covered 75% of 
the house repair and redecor- 
ation, with fraternity savings 
supplying the balance. 

The fraternity continued to 
serve as foster parents to two 
Indian children. Members hired 
themselves out to the community 
residents on "work day" once a 
semester in order to raise money 
for their philanthropy. 

The Epsilon Alpha chapter was 
once again eligible for the 
Grand High Alpha award sponsored 
by the national office every 
three years. This award is for 
general excellence, citing the 
Chapter as among the ten best 
in the country. Having won the 
award in 1973 and 1976, the 
Lambda Chi's had high hopes of 
achieving it again in 1979. 




218A.ambda Chi Alpha 



Ivambos Rebuild House 




LEFT: Bull sessions and high-level 

discussions provide a welcome relief at 

the Lambo house. 

BELOW: Lambda Chi takes on a law school 

team in the IM football playoffs. The 

squad finished second in all-college 

competition. 

OPPOSITE PAGE 

TOP: Brothers gather around Kevin Odor 

for home-made ice cream before a 

Monday night meeting. 

MIDDLE: Relaxation comes in the form of 

good tunes and a laugh for Marc Mines 

and Dave Evans. 

BOTTOM: Bright-eyed Steve Trozinski 

catches up on the latest developments 

on television. 



LEFT TO RIGHT: FIRST fiOW— Bill Bryan. Jamal Oweis, 

SECOND ROW— Craig Logue, Hillary Pandak, Steve 

Trozinski. Fritz Knapp, Bolj Manderfield. Andy 

Steinberg, J. W. Homsby. Spess Knebiett, Mike 

Kelliher, Dave Hissey. THIRD SOU'— Mayes Marks, Mark 

Gardner, Keith Tomlinson, Bruce Davidson, Tom Dick, 

Rick Manes, Walt Davis, Tim Hoag, Bill Mims, Dick 

Koms, Kerwin King, Colin Steel, Dave Evans. 

FOURTH ROW— Rick Wells, Dave Harris. Steve O'Doherty. 

Mike Bradshaw, John Zettler, Gregg Holland, Alan 

Paschall, Bob Rusevlvan, Marc Hines, Bill Scott. 

Randy Alley. FIFTH ROW— Mike Brewer. Kent Benton, 

Eric Barnes, Rich Broaddus, Kip Germain, Dean 

Kurtz, Brad Dawson. Kevin Odor. Scott Custer. 

SIXTH ROW— Mike Zupan. Scott Callahan. Cooper Walm- 

sley, John Holzinger. Greg Barrow. Rob Oliver, 

Mike Schmittlein. Mike Apostolou. 





AXA 



Lambda Chi Alpha/219 



Phi Tail ^Aetivat es^ Rush 




ABOVE: Pete Lane takes time off from stu- 
dies to write a letter. 

ABOVE RIGHT: Phi Tau President Tim Olewine 
answers a brother's question about an 
upcoming rush party. 

LEFT TO RIGHT: FIRST flOW-Wayne Mitchell, Neil 
Weinberg, Sue Scott (Sweetheart), Neil Kingsley, 
Jeff Wright. SECOND ROW— Dave Hopkins, Tom Marks, 
Doug Smith, David MacBrayne, Elliot Mondshine, 
Tim Olewine, Mike Doyle, Mark Armendaris, Ed Wray, 
Dana Heiberg, Teel Goodwin. 




220/Phi Kappa Tau 



I 



Being part of a group while 
maintaining your individ- 
uality" is Phi Kappa Tau's goal 
of brotherhood. According to 
Rush Chairman Teal Goodwin, the 
fraternity "offers something for 
everyone," making it the "best 
place to be" on the campus of 
William and Mary. 

Rush was a crucial part of 
spring semester. Having twenty- 
four brothers. Phi Tau was hop- 
ing to double its membership and 
fill the house. The "theme of 
activation" was thus uppermost 
during rush; all members were 
involved and participated fully. 
Prospects were favorable, as 
"more freshmen men seemed to be 
interested in fraternity life." 
Goodwin stated that this year's 
rushees had a "much better turn 
out than in the past two years." 

In addition to rush, the bro- 
thers held several open parties, 
and enjoyed their traditional 
Jamaican party and sweetheart 
dance in the spring. A beach 
weekend in South Carolina was 
a fun-filled close to the year's 
special events. A bloodbank co- 
sponsored with the senior class 
was Phi Tau's contribution to 
community service. 

Although small in membership, 
the Phi Taus remained active on 
campus, particularly in the arts. 
Ten brothers worked as disc 
jockeys at WCWM, while others 
worked on the SA film staff. 
ROTC and the Queen's Guard 
provided the complement of Phi 
Tau's activities. 

Spring goals included a con- 
certed house improvement effort. 
Plans were made for buying a new 
TV and furniture for the living 
room. 

Hoping for increased member- 
ship and greater participation, 
Goodwin viewed the future of Phi 
Tau optimistically: "The next 
few years will be building years. 
Within five years, if everything 
works out, we'll be a powerhouse 
on campus." 




LEFT: Elliot Mondshine relaxes at a Fri- 
day afternoon party. 

BELOW: To line up a shot, Mike Doyle uses 
a unique cue stick. 

FAR BELOW: At a fall smoker, Dave Hopkins 
explains fraternity life to a rushee. 




0KT 



Phi Kappa Tau/221 



PiKA Looks For^irard 





ABOVE: Caught by surprise at a smoker, 
David Morgan raises an eyebrow or two 
as Willy Shewmake looks on. 
LEFT: Armed with a grin and a hand- 
shake, Mike Ryan welcomes back a 
skeptical Tom Reddy at the PiKA 
Homecoming alumni reception. 



LEFT TO RIGHT FIRST flOW— Tom KnoUmann A Morse. 
LaiTv Ward Bruce Hatrak Kelley Lonx Kenny Winn 
SECOND fiOW— Will Rodgers Marty Braunstein Gary 
Raczkowski Harold Martin Bill Fartand John 
Kitchen Chris Camplair Jeff Bames THIRD ROW— 
Dave Fratt, Jim Reagan, Chartie Lutz, Mark Ever 
3ole. Herbie Hogge. Steve Smith, Paul Fletcher. 
Alan Clore, Tom Mayberry. Steve Macedo, Richard 
Smith, Greg Adams, David Smith, Rusty Quynn. Ian 
Mackay, Adrian Chapman, David Morgan, Mark Rhoads. 
FOURTH flow— Bob Dodson, Chuck Kelly. TOP— Ernie 
Pugh. Lord Botetourt (Chapter Advisor). Eddie 
Walters, David Langford, Steve Abdella. 




222/Pi Kappa Alpha 



We've reached the point 
where our rebuilding from 
the lean days of the early '70s 
is over," said Pi Kappa Alpha 
President Andy Morse. "Now 
we're improving on that foun- 
dation." PiKA was smaller this 
year because of a large class 
in 1978, but Morse saw a more 
manageable size as "conducive 
to greater unity." 

Careful financial man- 
agement kept the reduction of 
numbers from having an effect; 
in fact, the social program was 
expanded. Kegs with sororities 
became a mainstay of the social 
calendar, and post-game cook- 
outs were held with Kappa and 
Alpha Chi in the fall. A re- 
treat to Camp Makemie Woods was 
a success, and road trips to 
near-by schools were frequent. 
In February, brothers rolled to 
Richmond for a Regional Con- 
vention. 

Spring events in- 
cluded the annual sweetheart 
dance, a Founders Day dance, 
and a party for the PiKA and 
Kappa pledge classes. 

PiKA National cited Gamma 
chapter for community service 
in the annual Pike Marathon. 
A record $11,500 was raised for 
MD last April, and this year's 
marathon was also a success. 

Major events of the year 
included reactivation of the 
supper club and the founding of 
a house corporation. House 
improvements were focussed on 
the barroom and kitchen. The 
fraternity published an alumni 
newsletter in the spring, and 
worked on strengthening alumni 
relations. 

Little Sisters remained 
an important part of the 
fraternity, especially during 
rush. The spring pledge class 
was, according to Pledgemaster 
Paul Fletcher, "an infusion of 
new blood with great enthusi- 
asm and potential." 

As for the future, Morse 
concluded, "Around PiKA, we 
have a new sensitivity and 
willingness to listen. From 
here, we'll be planning ahead, 
looking to better ourselves." 




LEFT: PiKA's favorite pastime— 
foozball — is demonstrated by Mark 
Eversole, Jim Reagan, Herbie Hogge, 
and Ed Gormley. 

BELOW: Brothers, little sisters, and 
alumni enjoy an Indian summer after- 
noon and a Tribe victory over JMU. 
FAR BELOW: Warm smiles are the greet- 
ings from Mark Eversole and Andy 
Morse. 




TTKA 



Pi Kappa Alpha/223 



Pi Lams ^Downto Earth^ 




Friendly" was the word Pres- 
ident Andy Motsko used to 
describe Pi Lambda Phi fraterni- 
ty. Smokers were intentionally 
without themes, with members 
opting for more "down to earth" 
gatherings where brothers and 
rushees could talk and get to 
know one another. Friendliness 
proved to be the key element in 
a successful rush effort which 
increased Pi Lam's membership 
from forty-three to sixty-eight. 
Because of a consistently strong 
and stable rush, Psi Chapter 
won the National Outstanding 
Chapter Award for the third time. 

Good times and "craziness" re- 
mained top priorities at Pi Lamb- 
da Phi. The fall began with 
Homecoming, a weekend affair fea- 
turing breakfast, buffet and a 
dance with alumni. Pi Lam's 
float, a take-off on the Wizard 
of Oz theme— "Total Them Toto- 
ly" — captured first prize. 
Other fall activities included 
their semi-annual end of classes 
"Blow-Out" party, keg parties, 
and rock 'n' roll parties. In 
the spring brothers enjoyed the 
traditional wine and cheese par- 
ty for brothers and their dates. 
Sweetheart Dance at Fort Magruder, 
and a trip to Virginia Beach. 

Nine Pi Lams played varsity 
lacrosse and members turned out 
in force to give their support 
to the William and Mary team. 

Pledges sold hot dogs 
and donuts to raise money 
for house improvements. Addi- 
tions to the house included new 
carpeting and furniture for the 
living room. Once again. Pi Lams 
volunteered their services to 
the Heart Fund. 

Motsko forsees a "continued 
stability" within the Pi Lambda 
Phi fraternity. "Friendship 
among individuals" was, and will 
continue to be, a primary fac- 
tor in achieving unity within 
the fraternity. In regard to 
the future. Pi Lam sets two 
goals: to "move straight up," 
and to "have a good time." 



224/Pi Lambda Phi 




LEFT: Studious Pi Lams prepare for 
their next exam in Comparative Anatomy. 
OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP: Brothers enjoy a 
Saturday afternoon at Gary Field. 
BOTTOM: Ghris Royston and Kenny Gold- 
berg concentrate on an intense game of 
flippers on the house pinball machine. 



LEFT TO RIGHT: In boat-Bemie Renger. Nick Cavros 
FIRST ftOW-Steve Romano. Mike Little, Steve Hargett 
Dan Weintraub. Pete Creeden, .John Adams. Steve Harrison 
Chris Royston, Mickey McFadden, Charlie Hargest, Robbv 
Hall. SECOND ROW-Mike Yarnoff, Brian Mulvey Doui 
Salmon, Peter Hassett. THIRD flOlV-Mark Ellis, Chuck 
Horton, Rob Driver, Tim Harvey, Bill Timmons Chris 
Robbins. FOURTH ROW-Toii Campbell, Al Hammaker, 
Scott Walode. Rob Mordhorst, Bob Lacy, Danny Muccio 
Pat Little, Chuck Jones, Mitch Benedict, ,Jack Dunn. Rich 



eifffi^ 




TrA0 



Pi Lambda Phi/225 



Siigma Clii JSetsTraditioii 




ABOVE: Taking a time-out from rush, Bob 
Bryant pours himself a long tall one. 
ABOVE RIGHT; Junior Bill Pommerening 
is caught playing domestic in the Sigma 
Chi kitchen. 

OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP: Brothers gather for 
a candlelight serenade to sweetheart 
Margie Beck. 

MIDDLE: At the Homecoming reception, 
Scott Butler and Mike McGibbon welcome 
back alum Larry Luck while Chip Demp- 
sey looks on. 

BOTTOM: His face screwed up in a grim- 
ace, Lester Limerick takes a hit at the 
Derby Day egg toss. 



LEFT TO RIGHT: FIRST fiOH'— Bruce Menkes, Swaim, 
White. Rob Mauthe, Bob Bryant, Craig Morris. Jeff Rupp. 
SECOND flow— Clav Perfall. Howie Manetti. Blackman. 
Steve Rilev. Lou Paladeau. Rob Westlake. .Jim Barry, Tom 
Laudise. Wally Kramer. THIRD flOW— Stuart Burnett, Pat 
McGibbon, Pat Mulligan, Bill Pommerening, Steve Anderson, 
Dave Jones, Dick Smith, Hal Hicks, Trip Robins, Don Jones, 
Chip Dempsey, Doug Wood, Ricky Andrews. FOURTH ROW- 
Jones, Dean Short, Ron Coleman. Sun-Kun Lim. John Brant- 
ley, Doug Cook, Marshall Martin (chapter advisor). 




226/Sigma Chi 



Theme parties dominated the 
social calendar this year at 
the Sigma Chi house. According 
to President Jim Schwarz, these 
parties were "absolutely it; 
they were great fun and will 
probably become tradition." 
Starting in the fall with a "Pimp 
and Prostitute" party, the themes 
continued with a New Year's Eve 
party in November, a Cruise party 
on the James River, a Casino 
party, and a Beach party in the 
basement, complete with wading 
pools. 

An unprecedented break with 
tradition occurred when the 
Sigma Chi's were forbidden to 
entertain freshmen women with 
champagne at their annual recep- 
tion. Although this complied 
with state law, it was a dis- 
appointment to the brothers. 
Beer was substituted for bubbly, 
but part of the unique elegance 
which had traditionally sur- 
rounded this reception was def- 
initely diminished. 

Derby Day, Sigma Chi's yearly 
fund-raiser, netted $2,200 this 
year. This money was donated 
to their philanthropy, Wallace 
Village, a home for brain-dam- 
aged children. Other service 
projects included visits to the 
Pines Nursing Home and an or- 
ganized soccer league for men- 
tally retarded children in the 
area. 

Rush proved to be a success 
for the fraternity this year, 
resulting in twenty-two pledges. 
Schwarz stated that the pledge 
class, and indeed the entire 
fraternity, was characterized 
by "diversity." These individ- 
ual differences created a 
"stronger and more interesting" 
fraternity, and made the frater- 
nity an "educational experience" 
for the brothers. The diversity 
in personalities was exemplified 
by Sigma Chi's "visible involve- 
ment" in various aspects of cam- 
pus life — sports, theater, music, 
student government, and academics. 

Predictions for the future 
included "maintaining the bal- 
ance" which characterized Sigma 
Chi. Membership, due to a strong 
rush, remained fairly constant 
at seventy. 




Sigma Chi/227 



RIGHT; Their faces betray their alle- 
giances as John Grant, Cliff Connery, 
Keith Baklarz, and Dudley Johnson watch 
the Super Bowl. 



LEFT TO MGHT: FIRST ROW— John Culver, Paul Tyner, 
Grant, John Kelly, Cliff Connery. SECOND fiOW— Benner, 
Jerry Larson, Averel Snyder, Joel Miller, Chris Griffin, 
Mike Kneidineer, Steve ShuU, Peter Griffin. THIRD ROW- 
Ray Broughman, Chris Polglase, Keith Baklarz, Pete Dowlen. 
FOURTH flow— Bruce Caffert\ John Cerminara Fitz 
Patrick, Jimmy Ryan Tom Rozantz Ann Patterson (Sweet 
heart), Richard Stewart And\ Banks Dudle\ Johnson Fred 
Wallach, Terry Ha\elka Mike Lucas 





228/Sigma Nu 



Nti^m Establish Roots 



■ ast year Sigma Nu moved 
-^-* back on campus. This year, 
the fraternity, still in its 
rebuilding stage, sought to es- 
tablish itself as a permanent 
and viable organization at Wil- 
liam and Mary. According to Pres- 
ident Jim Ryan, "Sigma Nu is 
working toward developing more 
rapport with students, admini- 
stration, and community." 

Homecoming at Sigma Nu suc- 
cessfully began this year's so- 
cial activities, with the largest 
turnout of alumni in ten years 
attending a buffet and open par- 
ty held in their honor. A 
smoker where brothers dressed in 
the bizarre fashion of the mem- 
bers of the rock band Kiss, pro- 
vided a touch of the unusual to 
rush. 

Ryan was "pleased with rush" 
and expressed his desire to keep 
the fraternity small enough to 
allow individuals to get to know 
each and every member. Ryan be- 
lieved that, "In this way, the 
real purpose of fraternity life, 
true friendship, is fulfilled." 

The addition of their Greek 
letters on the outside wall of 
the complex provided the fin- 
ishing touch to last year's 
newly-furnished house. A House 
Corporation, comprised of a com- 
mittee of alumni, was formed to 
collect and allocate funds for 
house improvements. 

Community service projects in- 
cluded a Christmas Party, co- 
sponsored with Pi Beta Phi, for 
the children at Eastern State 
Hospital. Brothers hosted a re- 
ception for the Sigma Nu's from 
Old Dominion University, who 
dribbled basketballs from Nor- 
folk to Williamsburg to raise 
donations for the Heart Fund. 

In the 1980's, Ryan predicted 
that "emphasis will be placed 
on the internal structure of the 
fraternity." "Having overcome 
the obstacles of securing our 
place on campus," said Ryan, 
"Sigma Nu will focus on the cre- 
ation of our own traditions and 
personality in the future." 



^m 


1^ 


' \MkMnSi til i 


Lj^ 


^^^^^^ ^vkH^SH^^mh^^^BH 


^ 




ABOVE: Sigma Nu's Paul Tyner and Mike 
Lucas team up against Lambda Chi Tom 
Franco (center) in a friendly game of 
bridge on a Thursday night at the Sigma 
Nu's house. 

LEFT: With the tv set on and laying 
back in bed, brother Chris Polglase 
adopts a relaxed approach to the books. 
BELOW: Cracking a grin, Keith Baklarz 
tries not to laugh as Ray Braughman 
spins a long tall tale about the girl who 
got away. 




Sigma Nu/229 



{§ig Kp {Serves Campus 




LEFT TO RIGHT, FIRST ROW: Mike Goldich, Joe Vaughi 

Scott Heon. Rick Schoen. Brian Moore 

SECOND ROW: Brett Friedman, Rick Weitz, Riley Bates 

Claire Zarrilli, Marcie Renncr liiweethearti, Stephe 

Jim Griffin, Pete Fariel, Rick Zcleznikar 

THIRD ROW: Frank Swithers, Mike Morris, Bruce McCord 

Bettge. Chris Patton, John Evans, Dave Lucas, Stan Brvan 

Jordan Schlick, Dave Phillips 

FOURTH ROW: Dave Gasell, Al Heck, Tim Alford, Dann\ 

Brown, Rob Lvden, Gale Harvev. Rich 1ft, Kevin Hanev 

FIFTH ROW: Phil Stevenson, Prospect, Tom Schreiber, Daie 

Tikkala, Penn Wyrough, Bo Sawyer, Lenny Brooks, Horst. 

Danny O'Donohue, Perry Bell, Jim Simonowski, George 

Thompson, Deahl Frazier, Porter Peery, Bill Dwyer, Dave 

Grogan, Barrv Sharp, Dave Wallace, Jeff Campana, Mike 

Caldwell. Mark Andino 



TOP: Homecoming provides an oppor- 
tunity to party for Kathe Kelly, Jim 
Griffin, and Scott Heon. 
RIGHT; Sig Eps Mike Caldwell and Bill 
Dwyer shoot the breeze in the house 
lobby. 




Increased community aware- 
ness and involvement" marked 
the focus of Sigma Phi Epsi- 
lon's activities this year, ac- 
cording to President Brian 
Moore. By soHciting door to 
door, the Sig Eps earned $350, 
which they donated to the Heart 
Fund. Money was also raised for 
the Education Fund by selling 
W&M Activities Calendars. In 
addition to fund-raising, the 
brothers offered their time and 
talents to Help Unlimited, a lo- 
cal service organization. Their 
goal of "an active role in com- 
munity affairs" was fulfilled. 

As brothers became involved in 
"different facets of campus and 
community life," honors fostered 
an active image of Sig Ep. One 
of the brothers, Tim Alford, was 
named an all-star football play- 
er. Another, Brian Moore, was 
one of fourteen Sig Eps nation- 
wide to be honored with a schol- 
arship. 

Within the house, the Sig Eps 
hosted several theme parties: 
a Mardi Gras party, a Fifties 
party, and a Viking feast. Their 
record in intramurals was up- 
held by winning the team pool 
title and maintaining a good 
showing for the all-points 
trophy. 

New furniture was acquired 
for the upstairs living room 
and for the newly finished bar- 
room. A pool table and a new 
chapter room floor were other 
major additions. 

Rush, as always, proved to be 
an important event. With a sig- 
nificant increase in pledges, 
Moore feels that the future is 
"relatively secure." He believes 
that Sig Ep, because of "increased 
visibility" in collegiate and 
civic affairs "could be one of 
the top fraternities on campus." 
The brotherhood itself is 
characterized by "diversified 
individuals who still have a 
common thread between them, dis- 
playing ability to work, to live, 
and to socialize with different 
types of people." 



230/Sigma Phi Epsilon 



LEFT: Perched on the pinball machine. 
Dave Lucas watches with an amused smirk 
as a brother lines up a shot. 
BELOW: Brother Bill Dwver chalks his cue. 
FAR BELOW: Concentration is the key for 
Rob Lvden. 




Sigma Phi Epsilon/231 



FAR BELOW: Brothers Chad Perrine and 
Burdette Warwick check out the picture 
schedule. 

RIGHT: Good times are in order for 
Neil Morrison, Brad Eure, Susan Saund 
ers, and John Hellman at a Pi smoker 
OPPOSITE PAGE, Top: Sigma Pi scores 
against Pi Lam in an intramural match 
BOTTOM: Indoor soccer is demonstrated 
by Rob Goetz and Peach Yowan. 

LEFT TO RIGHT. FRONT: Steve Salter. .John Simonson 

FIRST ROW: Steve Libassi. .Jimmv Johnson. Chris Martin 

John McCulla. Kevin Ellis. Terrv Poole. Paul McCulla Bob 

Gaudian 

SECOND ROW: Dave Dodd. Jim Ward. John Hellman Chad 

Perrine. Rob Goetz. Dave Williams. Burdette Warwick Peach 

THIRD ROW: Cam Chesson. John Dubel. Steve Vogel 

Patterson Lyies. Dave Clark. Andy Waters. Tim Hurle\ Jerry 

Adler. Chris King 

FOURTH ROW: Nelson Dawson. Kent Wiggins. Matt Murrav 

Bob Elweil. Steve Graine. George Tankard. Dave Broadwell 

Bill Wolle. Will Ryan. Mike Hayden 

FIFTH ROW: Dave Mushinski. Randy Parrish 





232/Sigma Pi 



Laid-back^ JAifw-hs^^ Roivcly 




Sigma Pi fraternity, according 
to President Rob Goetz, 
is "impossible to stereotype." 
The diversity of individuals is 
the key point of the fraternity's 
philosophy. As Goetz states, 
"You can be a Sigma Pi and still 
be your own man." 

This year, the fraternity en- 
gaged in traditional activities 
such as a Homecoming Dance, 
Christmas Formal, and Sweetheart 
Dance. Rush smokers had an in- 
novative twist with the incor- 
poration of themes into each one. 
The Tourist Smoker, the Fall on 
the Floor Smoker, and the Red 
(neck). White (socks), and Blue 
(Ribbon Beer) Smoker were all re- 
sounding successes for both the 
brothers and the rushees. 

Brothers displayed a penchant 
for spontaneity in their home- 
coming float entry, the first in 
many years. Sure of rain, the 
Sigma Pi's rode up DOG Street on 
their "kick-ass" float with um- 
brellas and signs proclaiming 
the certainty of rain for the 
homecoming weekend. They fin- 
ished the parade by driving up 
DOG Street in reverse, a feat 
applauded by both the brothers 
and the spectators. Although 
they failed to place in the 
contest, Goetz believed that 
the float was "definitely the 
people's choice." 

Most important to the Sigma 
Pi's was the feeling of friend- 
ship which they found in their 
fraternity. Despite its Greek 
letters and rituals, the Sigma 
Pi's called themselves a "non- 
fraternity." Characterizing 
themselves as alternately "low- 
key, laid-back, and rowdy," they 
described themselves as a "group 
of guys who just enjoy having a 
good time together." Future 
goals consisted of growing a little 
larger in size, but maintaining 
the status quo of "non-frater- 
nity" fraternity life. No changes 
in attitude or philosophy seemed to 
be necessary. 




Sigma Pi/233 



ThetaDelt ChalksUpl^S 




234/Theta Delta Chi 




ABOVE: Demonstrating his "Oh my God, I 
lose again" sign, Peter Graham enter- 
tains Carole King at a Theta Delt Thum- 
per game. 

RIGHT: True to the W&M tradition. K.C. 
Hart tries to study. 

OPPOSITE PAGE, FAR LEFT: Preparing 
to refinish the house piano, Karl Olson 
and Dan lanni check the instructions first. 
LEFT: Armed with violin case and cigar, 
Greg Fronczak and Ed Moreland greet rush- 
ees at a gangster smoker. 

BOTTOM: Dave McClure, Walt Lundahl, and 
Jane Townsend mellow out on the back 
porch. 

LEFT TO RIGHT, JST ROW. Pat Warflc, Karl Olson. Bob 

Green, Tom Grassberger. Dean Buckius. Dave Duke, Dave 

Zoebelein, Rich Leardo. Jim Ledwith 

2ND ROW: Perry Lam. Clark Shuler. Sean Branigan. Ray 

Dyer. Ken Buller, Walt Lundahl. Dave McClure, Mike Murphy, 

Greg Fronczak. K.C. Hart, Arthur Moselev 

3RD ROW: Clay Warner, Mark Scura. Jiiii Riley, Brian Coad, 

Bob Duncan. Doug Hutcheson. Pete Evanow, Jon Ritson, Brent 

Finch, Hank Wood, Ed Moreland, Dan lanni 

4TH ROW: Phil Kilgore. Danny Quann. John Fullerton. 

Dan Chrisman. Ken Pavnter. Dave Garland, Dave EUenbogen, 

Joe Seitz. Brian Ledwith. Dick Fronko 





The most important 
word at Theta Delta Chi 
this past year was "convention." 
Epsilon charge celebrated its 
own 125th anniversary by hosting 
the 131st international conven- 
tion early in September. The 
affair was the culmination of 
over a year's work, and accord- 
ing to Perry Lam, Theta Delt 
president, the convention 
afforded the brothers the op- 
portunity to "strengthen the 
bonds" that held the frater- 
nity together. 

Preparing the house was a 
major effort, as the brothers 
installed a new bar downstairs 
and repanelled the entire base- 
ment. Financial assistance 
from Theta Delt National helped 
pay for the improvements, 

A week of meetings, band 
parties, and receptions ensued. 
The chance to meet brothers 
from 18 to 80 from all over the 
country was "an inspiration this 
house hasn't seen in a long 
time," said Lam. 

The enthusiasm generated early 
carried over into the rest of 
the year's activities. Rush 
was quite successful; Theta 
Delt pledged twenty-two men. 
Theme parties dominated the 
social calendar, as the 
brothers decked out in style to 
attend Wild West, Polynesian, 
and gangster parties. House 
traditions such as the Pearl 
Harbor Day smoker and Hairy 
Buffalo bash were not neglected. 

During both semesters, Theta 
Delt sponsored bands at the 
Pub to raise money for the 
Williamsburg Rescue Squad. In 
the fall, the fraternity per- 
formed an additional community 
service by introducing the 
highly popular Fat Ammons Band 
to the College. 

Only in intramurals did Theta 
Delt strike a less than suc- 
cessful note. After capturing 
the all-points trophy for two 
years straight, the brothers 
had trouble hanging on to it. 
However, Theta Delt did field 
strong teams in horseshoes, 
volleyball, and softball. 



BAX- 



Theta Delta Chi/235 




236/Sports 



Athletics: 
AWayofLife 



Like most selective in- 
stitutions of higher 
learning, at William and Mary 
the emphasis was on enriching 
the mind through a rigorous 
academic program. But surely 
there was more to life than 
books. Many students chose 
to become involved in various 
clubs, organizations, or Greeks. 
Still others chose to let 
athletics round out their aca- 
demic lives. One of these stu- 
dent-athletes was Jan Roltsch. 

Jan was the first woman gym- 
nast to receive a scholarship 
from the College. Her gymnastic 
career began in New Jersey at 
the tender age of eight and she 
entered her first competition at 
the age of ten. Jan won the 
East Coast Junior Olympic 
championship in the all-around 
competition at the age of 12. 
Then she decided to switch to 
trampoline and was fourth in 
the nation. 

Her family then moved to Wood- 
bridge, Virginia, where Jan com- 
peted for Gar-Field High School. 
She won the state championship 



in her freshman and sophomore 
years and Gar-Field won the team 
title in Jan's senior year. 

During the school year, Jan 
had classes until 2:00 and worked 
out from 3:00 to 6:00. Then she 
usually had dinner at the Caf 
and studied for the rest of the 
evening. Once the season started 
though, things really got hectic. 
The team had meets every weekend 
and traveled as far as Flori- 
da and Colorado. Commenting on 
the loss of leisure and party 
time, Jan said that the time 
spent in the gym was time that 
she might have wasted "goofing 
off," and that "We all (the gym- 
nastic team) get along so well, 
going to work out is like a 
party." Though she believed the 
traveling added another dimension 
to school, she cited the NCAA 
Nationals in Colorado as an ex- 
ample of the contrasting demand 
made on her by the sport and the 
books. "It was during mid-terms; 
we had to stretch and study at 
the same time, then go do a rou- 
tine and study some more ... we 
got real behind." 





ABOVE: Eight years of hard work 
result in a superior beam routine. 

LEFT: For Jan Roltsch, life at 
William and Mary is more than 
academics. 



Feature/237 



Strong Start for Tribe 



At the outset of the 1978 
football season, many area 
sportswriters were predicting 
that William and Mary would be 
one of the top teams on the East 
Coast. The Tribe was returning 
with virtually the same crew that 
had produced winning records in 
the last two seasons. The back- 
field was depending on Alvis Lang 
and Clarence Gaines to balance 
the passing of quarterback Tom 
Rozantz. The defense was ex- 
pected to be tough against both 
the run and the pass. 

The season began with a fine 
defensive showing against VMI, 
where the Tribe used a late 
fourth quarter touchdown by Ro- 
zantz to defeat the Keydets 
10-3. Against Connecticut, Ro- 
zantz had his best statistical 
performance in leading the team 
to a 27-3 victory. However, the 
next week against Villanova, the 
defense was stunned in the first 
half by 17 quick Wildcat points. 
But in the third period, the 
Tribe blocked a punt and ram- 
bled for three late touchdowns 
to complete a 21-17 come-from- 
behind win. 

Taking a 3-0 record into 
Blacksburg, the Indians took 
charge and led VPI 9-0 at half- 
time. Tech eventually took the 
lead in the fourth quarter at 
15-12. But the Tribe still had 
the spirit from the last game 
and successfully completed a 
Rozantz to Ed Shiefelbein 59 
yard bomb with 1:35 left in the 
game. With eight seconds left, 
Tech's quarterback David Lamie 
faced a fourth down at midfield. 
He released a desperation bomb 
in the area of three Indians and 
one Gobbler receiver. The ball 
was touched by the Tech player 
at about the goal line, but slid 
down his chest and landed on the 



UPPER RIGHT: In the huddle, QB Tom 
Rozantz conducts a strategy session. 
RIGHT: Offensive possession permits 
defensive tackle Pete Griffin to take a 
breather. 




238/Football 




Steve Libassi 


Chris Griffin 


Joe Manderfield 


Jim Rvan — Capt. 


Alan Drewer 


Fred Wallach 


Tom Rozantz — 


Dennis 


Capt. 


Fitzpatrick 


Kevin Odor 


Dave Haas 


Keith Best 


Rick Wells 


Al Tafro 


Jeff Godwin 


Tom Franco 


Louis Wright 


Clarence Gaines 


Cliff Connery 


Eric Barnes 


Dan Burnick 


James Hodges 


Michael 


Alvis Lang 


Blackburn 


Mike Brown 


Bill Scott 


Steve McNamee 


Pete Griffin 


Andy Banks 


Dudley Johnson 


Craig Harrington 


Steve Frisina 


Mark MuUady 


Mike Wagner 


Paul Tyner 


Richard Goode 


David Walton 


Rob Muscalus 


Jim DiNardo 


Mike Zupan 


Walt Davis 


Melvin Martin — 


Terry Havelka 


Capt. 


Robert Short 


Ken Cloud 


Keith Baklarz 


Bruce McFarlin 


Richard Lundvall 


Jon Horovitz 


Bobby Rash 


Ed Schiefelbein 


John Cerminara 


Chris Garrity 


Mike Kneidinger 


Doug Martini 


Steve Shull 


Bill Swertfager 


Peter Pfeffer 


Jim Root — 


John Kelly 


Head coach 


Owen Costello 





TOP: Against Temple, Ed Schiefelbein 
takes advantage of quickness and a Rob 
Muscalus block in returning an Owl punt. 



ABOVE LEFT: Confronted by a VMI de- 
fender, on the option play, quarterback Tom 
Rozantz pitches out to tailback Tom 
Franco. 



ABOVE RIGHT: With the football in 
enemy hands, Bruce Cafferty, Rob Muscalus, 
and Tom Rozantz gear up for the next 
offensive series. 



Football/239 



Record Proves Even 



ground. The referee signaled a 
touchdown, much to the bewilder- 
ment of everyone involved in the 
play. The loss was notched at 
22-19 and punched the air out of 
the inflated W&M Season. 

Against Temple, the Indians 
stubbornly held on to tie the 
Owls at 22-22. Rozantz and Lang 
followed good offensive block- 
ing to surprise the favored Owls. 
James Madison came for Homecom- 
ing and was sent home on the 
short end of an expected drub- 
bing. The final score was 32-7. 

Against Navy, the Indians faced 
the toughest defense in the 
country and was shut out 9-0. 
Statistically the Tribe matched 
the 17th-ranked Middies, but 
could not score. Against Louis- 
ville, W&M was hampered by five 
first half turnovers and trailed 
26-0. Clarence Gaines ran for 
148 yards and one of three meaning- 
less Indian touchdowns in a 31-21 
defeat. 

The Citadel came to Cary Field 
for the last home game of 1978. 
The Tribe sent them home 12-8 
losers on a fourth quarter touch- 
down by Alvis Lang. The Tribe's 
next opponent was East Carolina. 
This game was the first televised 
performance for W&M since 1960. 
If not for the fine showing of 
Steve Shull and the rest of the 
defensive crew, the 20-3 defeat 
to ECU could have been worse. 

The final game was played a- 
gainst perennial rival Richmond. 
In this rivalry, the underdog 
almost always wins, and this year 
was no different with a 17-3 
Spider victory. Ending the sea- 
son 5-5-1, the Indians displayed 
a pattern that pointed to the 
fourth game against VPI as the 
turning point of the season. 
Riddled by injuries in his re- 
ceiving corps, Rozantz took on 
much of the pressure for the of- 
fensive breakdown. Nonetheless, 
the 16 of 22 starters that grad- 
uated deserve credit for bring- 
ing a degree of excitement back 
to W&M football. 




&I«-S«^« 




240/Football 




OPPOSITE ABOVE: The coast is clear 
as Tom Franco turns the comer in a re- 
venge match against the VMI Keydets. 
OPPOSITE BELOW: Despite a diving at- 
tempt by Joe Manderfield, an incomplete 
pass results. 



TOP: Providing a woman's touch, 
three William and Mary attendants assist 
junior offensive tackle Bill Scott in re- 
adjusting his elbow pad for future combat 
on the Indian front line. 



ABOVE LEFT: Aided by the blocking of 
Rick Wells and John Cerminara, Alvis 
Lang scoots for yardage. 
ABOVE RIGHT: Surrounded by defenders 
in the secondary, Al Tafro leaps high for 
a pass. 



Football/241 



RIGHT; New members, such as Diane 
Branscome, bring fresh ideas and enthusiasm to 
the cheerleading squad. 

BELOW LEFT: In an attempt to mot- 
ivate the crowd, Lori Cook intently faces 
the stands. 

BELOW RIGHT: Practice and dedication 
create a professional looking cheer- 
leading squad at William and Mary. 





Not Just a Pretty Face 



/t used to be that when some- 
one mentioned cheerleaders, 
thoughts of saddle-shoes, bobbie 
socks, and never-dying enthusiasm 
came to mind. Today when someone 
mentions cheerleaders, many think 
of the Dallas Cowboys, or the 
high-heeled, hot pants-wearing 
ladies of other pro football 
teams. But at W&M the cheerlead- 
ers' goal was more than just look- 



ing good. "We're there to get 
the crowd to motivate the team," 
remarked Jerry Evans. 

To fulfill this goal, practice 
began two weeks before school and 
members of the squad took part in 
the National Cheerleading Camp. 
In addition to cheering, the squad 
also staged pep rallies around 
campus. But the question was, 
"Does the crowd respond to this 



effort?' Captain Lester Limerick 

explained that the fans showed 

"an amazing amount of enthusiasm.' 



Jerry Evans 
Samuel Eure 
Raymond Hatcher 
Lester Limerick 

— Capt. 
Jim Hall 
Bob Wagner 
'"'- '^ lith 



Linda Anderson 
Ja "■ 

Myde Boles 
Cathy Welch 
Laura Edwards 
Lori Cook 
Patti Pritchard 



242/Cheerleaders 



Twirlers Add Style 



1 yl /ith each new fall came a 
W new class of freshmen and 
within each class there were 
those who brought special talents 
to W&M. Some became marching 
band members, others played sports, 
and some became cheerleaders. 
Others brought with them a certain 
flair for entertainment. These 
were the majorettes. 

Tryouts were every fall and 
were run by the captains. Once 



the group was selected, they be- 
gan to practice three days a 
week. The music was chosen by 
Charles Varner, the band director, 
and while the band learned the 
music, the majorettes worked on 
their routines. On Friday the 
two groups put their routines to- 
gether. 

Still, there was more to being 
a good majorette than nimble fin- 
gers. "A lot of it is trying to 



show that you're having a good 
time," noted Donna Eccard. And 
like their infectious smiles, the 
majorettes' spirit seemed to be 
contagious. 



Susie Snarr 

— Capt. 
Loretta Forbes 
Donna Groover — 

Capt. 



Cathy Jones 
Linda Riley 
Donna Eccard 
Denise 

D'Agostino 





LEFT: Halftime entertainment includes 
the performance of majorettes Donna 
Groover and Donna Eccard. 

ABOVE: Featured twirler Linda Riley exe- 
cutes a complicated routine. 



Majorettes/243 



Ill«'"«lli 



ABOVE RIGHT; The highlight of the 
activities is the crowning of the 1978 
Queen, Kathy Lawlor. 

RIGHT: Once again the WilUam and 
Mary cheerleading squad adds spirit to the 
Homecoming festivities. 



244/Homecoming 






t one time, a member of the 
_ _ rock group, Steely Dan, was 
a student at W&M. He wrote a song 
based on his experiences here 
called "My Old School." The song 
reflected on some of his experi- 
ences at W&M and he asserted that 
he would never return to his "old 
school." Obviously, his feelings 
about the College were not shared 
by the 7000 alumni who returned 
in search of fun, friends, and 
memories during the 1978 Home- 
coming weekend. 

The weekend of events began at 
8:00 am Saturday with an Alumni 
Jog down Duke of Gloucester Street, 
followed by the annual Homecoming 
parade with the theme "That's 
Entertainment." The next event 
was the Homecoming game against 
Madison. To the joy of the Home- 
coming crowd, the Tribe smothered 
the Dukes 32-7. As always, one 
of the highlights of the game was 
the half-time activities, which 
saw Kathy Lawlor crowned Queen. 
Also, the Alumni Band, clad in 
white jackets and Dixieland-style 
hats performed, providing a lit- 
tle half-time nostalgia. That 
evening, the Senior Class spon- 
sored the annual Homecoming Dance 
with a top 40 group, "Staircase." 

For W&M students, both old and 
new, William and Mary was more 
than "my old school" during Home- 
coming weekend. It was a place 
alive with good times, friends, 
and nostalgia. 




Return to My 
OldSchoof 



ABOVE: As part of the William and 
Mary tradition, some alumni return 
not only to be entertained but to enterta 

LEFT: "That's Entertainment" for 
those watching the colorful array of 
Homecoming floats. 





mm^j^^. 


M 


It^wri 


■ 


^-^]3M 


Afc v^j^»- - 




y-vv* '^' '^^W^ 



Homecoming/24.5 



RIGHT: Accompanied by a cloud of 
dust, John McManus's pass skids through 
the legs of an onrushing opponent. 

BELOW RIGHT: The defense holds as 
Marty Nickley and John McManus help go 
keeper Steve Gallop protect the William 
and Mary net. 



Paul Crowley 


Al Heck 


Mike Bedell 


Peter Kalaris 


John Bray 


Ron Kraemer 


John Chuday 


John McManus 


Chris Davin 


Brian Mullins 


Bryan Davis 


Marty Nickley 


David Eklund 


Rob Olson 


David Ellenbogen 


Kevin Parks 


Brad Eure 


Dave Schaffer 


Steve Gallop 


Mark Sartor 


Kip Germain 


Graham Sykes 


Ben Glass 


Bill Watson— Capt. 


Steve Graine 


Mark Gardiner 




After their best season ever 
last fall, the Tribe's soc- 
cer team was looking forward to 
another outstanding year. After 
their first nine games, however, 
the prospects of even a winning 
season looked bleak. The Tribe 
was 2-5-2 after finishing last 
in the Harbor Front Soccer Clas- 
sic at ODU in October. It was 
the poorest start in the Tribe's 
history. But Head Coach Al Al- 
bert remained confident, and 
once the team got on the right 
track, the results were even 
more than he had hoped for. 

The first team to feel the re- 
kindled fires of the Indians was 
Christopher Newport. The Tribe 
blitzed the Captains 4-0. Next 
in line was VMI. Although the 
Keydets got off to an early lead, 
the Tribe came back to win 4-2. 
Then came a second game with ODU. 
The Monarchs were favored as they 
had beaten the Tribe earlier and 
were 6-1-1. When they met the 
Tribe for the second time, how- 
ever, the Tribe would not be 




From Sluggish Start - 
To State Title 



246/Soccer 





denied. With a score in the se- 
cond half, the Indians won the 
Division I East title. Richmond 
was the Tribe's next victim as 
the Tribe kept up its momentum 
whipping the Spiders 5-0. The 
Indians' next two victories were 
UNC, 5-2, and East Carolina, 3-0. 
Washington D. C. was the scene of 
the Indians' next attack as the 
Tribe went up against former NCAA 
champion, Howard University. 
Because of two air-tight defenses 
neither team was able to pene- 
trate and score. The teams were 
deadlocked zero to zero. 

The Tribe then entered into the 
playoff situation to determine 
the state championship. The Di- 
vision I West champs, Madison, 
were the first to fall to the 
Tribe by the score 1-0. In the 



championship final, the Tribe 
went against Randolph-Macon. In 
the second half, Chris Davin 
scored the game's only goal with 
an assist by Kevin Parks. 

It was on to the ECAC tourna- 
ment for the Indians, but against 
Lehigh the Tribe's dream season 
was cut short of a miracle as the 
scoreboard read 1-0 in favor of 
Lehigh at the game's close. 

The '78 soccer team was charac- 
terized by intense, emotional 
play the second half of the year, 
and in the face of dismal odds 
came back to win the College's 
only state championship. The 
Tribe boasted six All-Division 
players and two Honorable Men- 
tions, but as Coach Albert con- 
cluded, "We hope that we don't 
have the same problems next year.' 

ABOVE LEFT: Leading scorer Rob Olson 
exhibits the smooth style that enables 
him to pace the Tribe's offense. 
LEFT: In the State Championship game 
with Randolph-Macon, midfielder Chris 
Davin battles for control of a loose 
ball. 



Soccer/247 



LadyRuggers 



The women's rugby club began 
about four years ago when 
some women lawyers decided that 
it would be a novel idea to play 
rugby. It gained popularity 
with many freshmen who were look- 
ing for an unstructured sports 
club without some of the pres- 
sure of varsity competition. 
Coach Jack Russell felt that the 
club was structured around vol- 
untary efforts and that this "en- 



hances the tightness of the 
club." Women had the advantage 
of not having to unlearn the 
lessons of football, but the 
disadvantage of not being ac- 
customed to physical contact. 

The team, which was ranked #5 
in the nation last year, finished 
8-3-2 in 1978. They traveled as 
far south as Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina and as far north as 
Delaware to play. 





248AVomen's Rugby 




-A Gentleman's 
Game 



The word "Rugby" carried 
with it connotations of 
black eyes, broken bones, and 
tom-up shirts with striped 
sleeves. But those who played 
the sport knew that the tough 
physical contact without the 
protection of pads was only one 
aspect of the game. Or as David 
Hoyt put it, "It's really a 
gentlemen's game." 
Rugby was a club sport at 



William and Mary, and as such, 
received no money and very lit- 
tle in the way of College support 
of any kind. Despite this, the 
team finished with a 10-3 record 
for one of their best seasons 
ever. 

The team was a well-balanced 
one with no real standouts. Un- 
like the teams of the past, they 
had a lot of younger enthusiastic 
guys, which reflected an increase 
in popularity. And as more people 
learned about the sport some of 
the half-truths undoubtedly began 
to fade. 



Averel Snyder 
Tom Monday 
Paul Solitario 
Marc Hines 
Brian White 
George Stone 
Chris Wittmann 
Mil<e Gloth 
Mike Lambert 
Bob Lambert 
Bob Middleton 
Chuck Bourgeoii 
Daniel Drljaca 
Cecil Creasey 
Mike Doyle 
•Jack Blanton 
Bret Bettge 
Mike .Jones 
Whit Edwards 
Dave O'Neil 
•John Faulkner 



John McCulla 
Paul McCulla- 
Capt. 



Mike Mason 



m Ratkus 
nandy Parrish 
Kevin Murphy 
.Jeff Gould 
Ken Smith 
Ken Griffin 
•James (Fuma) 

Wheat 
•Jack Russell 
Bob Gaudian 
Eric Meyer 
Warren Aldrich 
Ed Evans 
David Hoyt 
.Joe Smegma 



Men's Rugby/249 



LOWER LEFT: A VCU match provides 
field experience for freshman Katie Lehr, 

NEAR RIGHT: Though still a freshman, 
Mary Herald starts as a varsity wing. 

LOWER RIGHT: Flanked by the opposi- 
tion, junior Sharra Kelly maintains ball 
control. 




250/Field Hockey 




Although they were hope- 
ful, few girls on the 
Women's Varsity Hockey team 
knew in August that they would 
be contributing to one of the 
finest seasons in William and 
Mary's history. En route to 
amassing a 10-2-1 season record, 
the varsity stickwomen battled 
their way to seven consecutive 
shutouts and outscored their 
opponents by a margin of 6:1. 
Allowing only six goals all 
season, four-year goalie Cindy 
Heldt and sweeper Peel Hawthorne 
joined halfbacks Heather Meldrum 
and Bevin Engman to present an 
almost impenetrable defense. 
Further up the field, captain 
Cheryl Proscino and link Pixie 
Hamilton headed a highly skil- 
led offense which produced a 
total of 33 goals during the 
season. Combining these two 



Penalty Shot Decides It 




aggressive squads, the team 
compiled the best record in the 
Tidewater area and qualified 
for the state playoffs. 

Then the trouble began. The 
three best teams in the state 
were placed in the same bracket 
in the tournament; W&M, Madison, 
and U.Va. After beating Madison 
in the first round, William and 
Mary faced U.Va. later on the 
same day. The Indians dominated 
the Cavs throughout the game, 
but neither team was able to 
score. After two double over- 
times, the score remained 0-0 
and the game was decided with 
penalty shots. The first two 
sets of penalty shots ended in 
ties. In the third set, however, 
Virginia managed one more goal 
than William and Mary, and the 
right to advance to the state 
finals. 

TOP: A follow-through by Peel Haw- 
thorne lands a bit wide of its mark. 

NEAR LEFT: Goalie Cindy Heldt stands 
by as Heather Meldrum clears the ball. 



Field Hockey/251 



Back in the Running 



¥ 1 ndefeated, yet disap- 
^-y pointed, characterized the 
Tribe's 1978 Cross Country team. 
Guided by second year coach, Roy 
Chernock, the cross country team 
stormed to an undefeated 7-0 
mark in dual meet competition. 
Victories over state rivals 
Richmond, Madison and U.Va. were 
especially satisfying to the 
team. Seniors Rich Rothschild, 



BELOW: One of the consistent perform- 
ers for the Tribe is Rich Rothschild. 
BELOW RIGHT; Captain Mike Ellington 
and alumnus Reggie Clark emerge from the 
woods loop at Dunbar Farms. 



Kevin Ellis and captain Mike El- 
lington provided consistent per- 
formance and leadership. The 
top runner and MVP was Jim 
Shields, a junior. Shields had 
an outstanding season and was 
named to the All-East team. 
Freshman Ira Meyers, who con- 
sistently finished in the top 
seven and placed 16th in the 
State Championships, was chosen 
as Rookie of the Year. 

Though unstoppable in the 
regular season, the team did not 
fair so well in the Virginia 
State Intercollegiates. Virginia 
Tech managed to squeak out the 



win, beating the Tribe by one 
point. Coach Chernock pointed 
to the fact that Ellington was 
sick the day of the meet and did 
not finish the race. In the 
IC4A championship, the team 
finished eleventh with Shields fin- 
ishing in the ninth position 
individually. 

Chernock attributed the suc- 
cess of the season to the dedi- 
cation of the runners. The team 
was already in superior shape 
when the practices began, having 
put in many long hours of in- 
dividual effort over the summer 
months. 




252/Men's Cross Country 



LEFT: In his last cross country race as 

an Indian, Senior Kevin Ellis takes first 

place. 

BELOW: The only freshman to break into 

the varsity seven, Ira Meyers heads for 

home with seniors Kevin Ellis and Rich 

Rothschild. 

FAR BELOW: Runners jockey for position 

at the start of a race. 




Men's Cross Country/253 



New Coaching Sustains 



For any team, the first 
season under a new coach 
is a time for readjustment. 
The 1978-79 women's basketball 
team faced that situation with 
the arrival of Coach Barbara 
Wetters. The team, with most 
of last year's players return- 
ing, used the first half of 
the year to adjust to the new 
coaching style and to introduce 
a talented group of freshmen 
to college basketball 

Midway through the season, 
the Indians topped most of the 
statistics charts for the 
Piedmont Conference, one of 
the toughest conferences in 
the state. The team joined a 
high-scoring offense with a 
well-coordinated defense to 
compile a string of victories 
early in the season. Offensive- 
ly, Lynn Norenberg and Janet 
McGee had the top field goal 
percentages, while Karen John- 
son and Nancy Scott led in 
free throws. On defense, 
Betty Strock and Liz Edwards 
controlled the backboards in 
rebounding, while Tammy Holder 
consistently stole the ball 
from unwary opponents. 

Coach Wetters was very 
pleased with the team's improve- 
ment throughout the year. "We 
started to peak towards the 
end of the season, close to 
tournament time, which is as 
it should be." She cited a 
strong defense as one major 
reason for the Tribe's success- 
ful season. With the high 
individual scoring potential 
and the youth of the team 
(no seniors), Wetters feels 
the team can play even better 
ball next year. The players 
are also very optimistic 
about next year, when the team 
returns intact to carry on a 
winning tradition. 

ABOVE RIGHT: Undaunted by GMU's 
defense. Lynn Norenberg penetrates to the key. 
NEAR RIGHT: Forward Janet McGee takes 
advantage of an open shot. 



254/Women's Basketball 




I 



A WinniriQ Tradition 






''**»^ 






^?|»^ 


>^t 


. Wii 


U«^ 


^'^t^: ' 


^X 


^^ 






w,.'^ 


u 




m 


'^V 
^ 


V ^ 




> 





ABOVE LEFT: A jump shot gives six-footer 
Betty Strock a chance to use her height. 
ABOVE RIGHT: Five-foot four guard Cecelia 
Dargan fires high for two points 
LEFT: Sweeping in for the score, the 
Tribe leaves GMLI in their wake. 



Women's Basketball/255 



Tribe 

Starts 

Fresh... 

' ^ F t established the tone for 

■* the season" commented Head 
Coach Bruce Parkhill. The "It" 
which he was referring to was the 
inexperience brought about by the 
graduation of four starters and 
two substitutes. As if that were 
not enough, the Tribe also lost 
their only returning starter, 
Teddy O'Gorman before the season, 
to a knee injury. Hopes of e- 
qualizing last year's 16-10 re- 
cord appeared dim and sophomore 
Scott Whitley admitted, "When the 
whole team is inexperienced you 
are going to take some lumps." 
Parkhill's goals as the season 
began were to "fight impatience 
and develop a good, competitive 
team" and with this in mind the 
Indians opened the season against 
two Division III opponents, Dela- 
ware Valley and Christopher New- 
port in the Hall. As expected, 
both teams were easy prey for 
the Tribe with Delaware losing 
86-64 and CNC falling 66-54 de- 
spite the Captains' inspired 
defensive play. 

The Tribe's first real test 
came next against the Mountain- 
eers. The Indians controlled 
the tempo. However, the Tribe 
dropped behind shortly before 
the half and fell to the Moun- 
taineers 45-39. This low score 
would become the mark of the 
Indians' contests. The next 
game was at home against a pow- 
erful ECU team. This time the 
Tribe came out on top 60-54 up- 
setting the favorited Pirates. 

The Tribe then became VPI's 
59th consecutive victim at home. 
In the second half the Hokies 

ABOVE RIGHT: Point guard Billy Harring- 
ton, controls the tempo as he heads upcourt. 
NEAR RIGHT; Surrounded by Marlins, Kenny 
Bowen takes the inside shot. 



256/Men's Basketball 





NEAR LEFT: Starting sophomore Scott Whit- 
ley makes a strong move to the hoop. 
BELOW LEFT: A flat-footed opposition 
watches Whitley fly in for two. 
BELOW: The smooth style of freshman 
Billy Barnes shows promise for the future. 




found their range, shooting 
67.7 percent in addition to 
blocking 12 Indian shots to drop 
the Tribe 84-59. The Richmond 
Times Dispatch Tournament was 
next with the Indians facing VCU 
in the opener. Up to this point 
the Tribe had the nation's ninth 
best defense but the offense had 
been lacking. This pattern held 
against VCU as the Indians fell 
60-43 despite Whitley's 20 points. 
The Tribe's next challenge was 
Richmond. The score at the end 
of regulation read 61-61. Unfor- 



Men's Basketball/257 



...Finds 
Going 
Rough 

tunately, a 3 point play by the 
Spiders with 1:03 left in over- 
time put an end to the Indians 
hopes 64-62. Back in the Hall, 
Muhlenberg never really posed a 
threat as the Indians triumphed 
80-64. William and Mary's next 
opponent was James Madison. In 
a close game, with the lead 
changing continually, the Dukes 
managed to use the four corners 
offense to runout the clock and 
preserve a 56-55 win. 

The Tribe traveled to Charlot- 
tesville to face the talent-laden 
Cavaliers, but the Indians were 
never really in the game as UVA 
rolled to an embarrassing 95-56 
win. The Tribe dropped their 
sixth straight road loss to Rich- 
mond 83-72. 

Though the Indians were not win- 
ning, there was visible improve- 



ment, especially in the play of 
freshmen Bowen and Barnes who 
combined for 44 points against 
VA Wesleyan for the Tribe's fifth 
win 67-62. Back on the road, the 
VCU defeated the Indians for the 
second time 67-46 in Richmond. 
Then, at exactly the midpoint 
of the season, the young Tribe 
seemed to gain a measure of ma- 
turity. The Indians, with a 5-8 
record managed to maintain their 
enthusiasm and began to reach 
their season goal. "Winning and 
losing is secondary to being com- 
petitive," analyzed Parkhill. 
Against ODU the Tribe seemed to 
gel playing a stingy man-to-man 
defense and a slowed down, methodi- 
cal offensive pattern, both of 
which were exemplary of the 
Indians' style of play. The 
Tribe held a 22-17 lead at the 
half, but the Monarchs shot 68.4 
percent in the second half to 
down the Indians 48-42. A re- 
match with ECU was next on the 
schedule and at the end of regu- 
lation play the score was tied, 
sending the game into overtime. 
The outcome was decided in dou- 
ble overtime as ECU prevailed 
61-59. The Indians again looked 
good in a losing effort at home 
against South Carolina in a game 



televised by NBC. It was during 
halftime of this game that former 
W&M forward John Kratzer, who 
died of cancer May 18, 1978, was 
honored by the U.S. Basketball 
Writers Association as the nation's 
Most Courageous Athlete. The 
5,000 fans gave the former team 
captain a standing ovation. The 
Indians, who had been wearing 
black bands all season in memory 
of Kratzer, fell to the Gamecocks 
62-54 in a valiant effort. Sche- 
duled next was undefeated Roanoke, 
and the Tribe was down by one 
when Bowen sank a lay-up at the 
buzzer giving the win to the In- 
dians. The Tribe continued to 
show their development as they 
upset Navy 68-63. It seemed as 
though the team was coming of 
age. Though the Tribe's record 
may not show a successful season, 
the experience gained this year 
may provide the foundation for 
future successes. "Patience is 
a virtue," insisted Parkhill, and 
this year's patience will be re- 
warded by next year's victories. 

BELOW LEFT: As the ball comes off the 

ring, the Indians screen out their 

opponents. 

BELOW RIGHT; From the foul line. "Whit" 

takes a jumper. 




258/Men's Basketball 




NEAR LEFT: After penetrating the Pirate 

defense. Wagner goes for the lay-up. 

BELOW LEFT: Suspended Uke marionettes, 

Bowen and his defender vie for ball 

control. 

BELOW: Enveloped by the opposition, 

Courage looks for the rebound. 




^ 



Mark Ri.sing. 
Scott Whitle 
Tim Wagner 
Ciuy Courage 



orge Mellon 
Bobbv Bovd 
Billy Barnes 
Dale Moaies 
Craig Larisch 
Doug Myer 



Men's Basketball/259 



RIGHT; Backed by their coach, Phyllis 
Coleman, Ruth Trice, and Debbie Reed 
anticipate a strong serve. 
BELOW RIGHT: This powerful spike pro- 
vides a key offensive strategy for Driana 
Davies. 



Ph 


/His Coleman 


Tami Olenich 


La 


jra Dalv 


Debbie Reed 


Dr 


ana Davies 


Kathv Thompson 


Ma 


rty Dickens 


Ruth Trice 


Gis 


ela Lopez 


Roxanna Zamora 


Lyi 


in Nash 






Around that time in early 
September when most of us 
were just arriving at school, 
moving in, and exchanging summer 
anecdotes, the women's volley- 
ball team was already hard at 
work in Adair. "We do a whole 
lot of conditioning," emphasized 
Coach Debbie Hill. Though such 
conditioning developed the 
speed, strength, and endurance 
demanded in volleyball, the 
team was handicapped by in- 
experience. With only four 
upperclassmen returning and the 
squad embarking on its first 
extensive AIWA season, the 
spikers had their work cut out 
for them. 

"From brilliant to mediocre" 
was Coach Hill's description of 
the Tribe's up and down season. 
Led by veterans Driana Davies 
and Kathy Thompson, and fresh- 
man Tami Olenich, the team 
rolled up a 17-13 record. In 
the highly competitive women's 
small college state tournament, 
the Indians fell prey to their 
lack of experience and were 
eliminated in the quarter finals. 
The women finished a respectable 
third, however, and with all 
but one spiker returning, they 
anticipated a smashing season 
for next year. 



Inexperienced 
but Determined 




260/Volleyball 



The College of William and 
Mary is unique in many 
ways. Its age, location, and 
academic standards are the three 
areas most commonly credited 
for this uniqueness, but there 
is yet another reason to con- 
clude that this is a very 
special institution: the Tribe's 
varsity badminton team is the 
only such team existing in the 
state. 

Being the only team in the 
state did make for an unusual 
situation. "We have to travel 
a lot," disclosed Joyce Batche- 



lor. Duke, North Carolina, 
Washington D.C., and Maryland 
were the sights of most of the 
Tribe's matches. The Indians 
did, however, hold their own 
two-day tournament in February 
and attracted the top teams 
and individuals from the Mid- 
Atlantic States. 

Monday night practices at Adair 
provided the setting for work 
on the technique and strategy de- 
manded by the "world's fastest 
racquet sport." "You have to 
be highly skilled and very quick," 
summarized Coach Catherine 



Scheibner. The shuttlecock is 
capable of tremendous speed and 
requires equally quick reflexes 
of the player. 

This year the men's team was 
stricken by the loss of its 
four senior leaders and usually 
traveled in conjunction with 
the women's team lead by nation- 
ally rated Laura Daly. The AIWA 
National Championships were 
held in Washington D.C. this 
year, instead of at the usual 
West Coast site, giving the 
team an opportunity to partici- 
pate in a national event. 



Varsitx; Unique inVirginia 




LEFT; Scholarship holder Laura Daly sends 
the shuttlecock sailing over the net. 
ABOVE: A rally between .Joyce Batchelor 
and Cecile Gaskell is supervised by Coach 
Scheibner. 



Badminton/261 



Tribe Clinches 3 
Tournaments 



Grappling with unforeseen 
setbacks and a rigorous 
schedule, the Tribe, a young 
team coached by Ed Steers, com- 
piled an 11-6 record in duals 
and captured three tournament 
victories. The team's only de- 
feats came at the hands of 
nationally ranked teams such as 
Navy, Cleveland, and Temple. 

In January, W&M wrestled with 
unscheduled competitors and 
suffered an unjustified defeat 
when nearly 50% of the grapplers 
were weakened by injuries and 
illness. A compression fracture 
of a neck vertebra abruptly 
ended the 8-0 winning streak of 
last year's NCAA Regional champ, 
Greg Fronczak. Consequently, 
Colin Steele relaxed his diet 
to compete in the 167 lb. divi- 
sion, where he tallied a 17-4 
record. A 12-1 winning streak 
in dual matches (bowing only to 
a nationally ranked opponent). 



provided the skeleton for 
Steele's record. After drubbing 
the twenty team opposition at 
the Monarch Civitan Open, the 
Tribe lost matches to North 
Carolina State and Temple. How- 
ever, the Indians rebounded and 
zapped Franklin and Marshall, 
32-6, and Pittsburgh, 20-18. 

At the completion of the NCAA 
Eastern Regionals, William and 
Mary placed third among twenty- 
six teams. Freshman Jim Pagano 
(118-126 lbs.) muscled his com- 
petitors to seize a first and 
qualify for the Nationals. Cap- 
tain Tom Braun (134 lbs.) and 
Pat McGibbon (150-158) landed 
seconds, while Chip Dempsey 
(190), Steele, and Bill Swezey 
(134) placed third. 

By the end of February, Sen- 
ior Tom Braun had thrashed his 
opponents to earn a 27-7 record. 
Jim Pagano powered the Tribe 
during his first year of colle- 



giate competition and debuted 
with a 22-8 record. Pat McGibbon 
also avenged the stiff schedule, 
finishing 22-11. Although 70% 
of last year's starters were lost 
at graduation, W&M remained the 
best tournament team in Virginia. 

BELOW LEFT: A tight squeeze is applied by 
freshman Bill Swertfager as he pins an 
opponent. BELOW: With the match over, Chi] 
Dempsey's hand is raised in victory. FAR 
BELOW: Junior Colin Steele seems to have 
his adversary in quite a bind. 





262/Wrestling 




Everett Boyd 


Bill Pincus 


Tom Braun 


David Puster 


Raymond 


Paul R«agan 


Broughman 


Wayne Reed 


Marty Campbell 


Mike Stacks 


Bill Carpenter 


Colin Steele 


Bruce Davidson 


Bill Swertfager 


Bob Davis 


Bill Swezey 


Chip Dempsey 


T'nYM T'ni-Vioirillo 


lom luroeviiie 


Tom Dick 


Eric Vance 


Jon DuBois 


Rick Zandarski 


Matt Franz 


Susan Donnelly, 


Greg Fronczak 


Mgr. 


Dale Garner 


Jody Hall, mgr. 


Mike Gloth 


Laurie Peery, mgr. 


Jeff Godwin 


Tom Dursee, asst. 


Scott Heon 


coach 


Matt Hoeg 


Max Lorenzo, 


John Holsinger 


asst. coach 


George Long 


Mike Nuckols, 


Pat McGibbon 


asst. coach 


Andy Mika 


Tom Scarr, asst. 


Steve Minter 


coach 


Neil Morrison 


Ed Steers, head 


Jim Pagano 


coach 


Tom Peebles 







ABOVE LEFT: With a powerful crossface, 
Colin Steele attempts to bring his 
challenger's back to the mat. LEFT: At- 
tempting to spin behind, Senior Tom 
Braun fights for two critical points. 
ABOVE: Battling for control. Bill Swezey 
pushes his opponent off the mat. 



Wrestling/263 



Swimmers Rank No. 2 



/n a season that carried 
ten team members to 
nationals and captured second 
place in the state meets in late 
February, the W&M women's swim 
team wrapped up another success- 
ful season. 

Relying once again on the 
strengths of nationals-bound 
sophomores Jenny Tatnall, 
Maureen Redmond, Heather Nixon, 
and Kristen Esbensen, the team 
produced two winning freshmen, 
backstroker Laura Schwarz and 
freestyler Lora Jean Masters, 



who headed to Nevada with the 
team for nationals. Perennial 
champion Kathe Kelley was back 
this season to capture several 
medals at state, and went on 
to nationals along with junior 
Chris Wenzel. In addition to the 
eight swimmers, under Coach 
Chris Jackson's guidance, diving 
coach Earl McLane saw two 
protegees, sophomore Carolyn 
Morse and transfer Teresa Norman 
also head to nationals. 

In a season full of tough, 
big-league competition, the 



swimmers showed their energy 
at the state meet. The 
victories were impressive, 
including Jenny Tatnall's gold 
medals in the 500 meter and 200 
meter freestyles, as well as a 
3rd place ranking in the 1650 
yard freestyle. Laura Schwarz, 
in a record-breaking upset, swept 
away first place in the 50 meter 
backstroke, as well as taking 
second in the two hundred. 
Other gold medals went to senior 
Kathe Kelley in the 200 meter 
individual medley, and to Teresa 




Sarah Baird 

Mary Lee Batei 

Wendy Berry 

Kristen Esbensen 
XT ^gjjgy 

Ferguson 
Sarah Harman 
Kathleen Kelley 
Linda Lemon 
Janet Mallison 



Lora Jean Masters 



Carolyn Morse 
Marta Nammack 
Heather Nixon 
Teresa Norman 
Kira Rathjen 
Maureen Redmond 
Laura Schwarz 
Jennifer Tatnall 
Christine Wenzel 
Kathiyn Whitworth 



ABOVE: Head tucked and body stiffened, 
Heather Nixon launches into relay com- 
petition. RIGHT: The smooth strokes of 
Janet Mallison are the results of hours 
of practice. 







1 ^ 




:>\ 


' \; 






1 ' " 




■^^?-^' ~^ ■':- 




1 ■ 


%J.^:J:-^^^^^'--- 


i^K.'jf 


P|; 




"' '*• ^'vl^-" 








.. j^*ig 


*^ 


I ^* - -C 






'i^^ -■'" 


WL' .....s 




--^''*' 


m^:^^?::^^'--m. . 


- ■ ■ -5- ' . ■ . . ^" 


i.#Sr*v--rv.: 




.. -- --'^'f 


; - - ~:ii»iS* ''' 






■;■ .•jj,><Ji,. 


' " -r'Z 




^■^^■^■RSgpRf:,^!^ 


jT^W.-^i'sr^H 




•. i-^^'^^H 


m 



264AVomen's Swimming 



Norman for three meter diving. 

The future is promising for 
freshmen Laura Schwarz and Lora 
Jean Masters as they continue 
to rack up victories. With these two 
outstanding women, as well 
as a strong supporting team, 
W&M's swimmers should see 
numerous victories in seasons 
to come. 




Women's Swimming/265 



BELOW: Taking laps in pairs makes prac- 
tices less a chore for Bill Weihs and 
Keith Sullivan. BOTTOM: Undefeated breast- 
stroker Tom Holmberg shows how he gets 
the jump on competition. 





266/Men's Swimming 






nrffffMrffffr 



Daily Practice 
Sets the Pace 



Swimming, like most other 
individual sports, demands 
dedication. Like gymnastics, it 
requires body strength and co- 
ordination. Like track, it takes 
an enormous amount of endurance 
and speed. And like both of 
these sports, it takes a great 
deal of time and practice to 
excel. There are no shortcuts. 

Members of W&M's men's swim- 
ming team practiced twice a day, 
once at 6:30 am. before classes 
and then again after classes. 
Adding to the sacrifice, the 
team raised money by selling 
bags of peanuts so that they 
could spend part of Christmas 
break in beautiful West Palm 
Beach, Florida. That's a sacri- 
fice? "Most of us didn't get 
to go to the beach once," ex- 
plained Jim Badzgon. While in 
Florida, the men endured two 
practice sessions a day, log- 
ging 75,000 meters of swimming, 
which is close to fifty miles. 
They accomplished all 
of this while most of us 
at home were feasting on left- 
over turkey. Now that is sacri- 
fice. 

The Tribe was willing to pay 
this price, and fortified by a 
strong dose of talent and team 
depth, the Indians posted a 7-2 
record, their best in seven 
years. 

The men were led throughout 
the season by junior Doug Slater, 
who set two state records in 
addition to winning the state 
title in the 200 meter back 
stroke, placed second in the 



200 meter individual medley, 
and captured third in the 200 
meter butterfly. Tom Holmberg 
amassed an impressive collection 
of wins as he went undefeated 
in the 200 meter breaststroke. 
Seniors Mike Hennessy and Glenn 
Anderson were the strengths of 
the freestyle corps while fresh- 
man Brett Wadsworth was a 100 
meter freestyle and 200 meter 
individual medley standout. 
Freshman Tom Martin emerged as 
the Tribe's leading diver after 
Scott Gauthier suffered a broken 
foot in gymnastics competition. 
Under the tutelage of Coach 
Dudley Jensen, the Tribe was 
able to combine talent, team 
depth, and dedication to produce 
the strongest group of swimmers 
the College has seen in years. 

LEFT ABOVE: Shadows lend a special atmo- 
sphere to practice in Adair for Tom Holm- 
berg, Bill Weihs, and Curt Whittaker. 
LEFT BELOW: Despite the grueling workout. 
Bill Weihs and Keith Sullivan find time 
to clown around. 



Glenn Anderson 


Brian Ledwith 


James Badzgon 


Thomas Martin 


H. Harold Baker 


Edward McLeod 


Chris Bell 


Chris Patton 


Doug Borden 


John Rhein 


W. David Clark 


Thomas Schreiber 


Richard Corns 


Fred Schultz 


Michael Fones 


Douglas Slater 


Scott Gauthier 


Keith Sullivan 


Michael Goodrich 


Joe Vaughan 


WilUam Harding 


Brett Wadsworth 


Michael Hennessy 


William Weihs 


Thomas Holmberg 


Curtis Whittaker 


Jack Horst 


Richard 


Charles Kendrick 


Zeleznikar 


John M. Kennedy 





Men's Swimming/267 




Lynn Atkins 


Liz Mowatt-Larssen 


Kim Brittain 


Jan Roltsch 


Cathy Dechiara 


Billie Schmidt 


Mary Felt 


Sally Surprenant 


Debby Heim 


Susan Wagstaff 


Kathe Monroe 


Connie Wiemann 



TOP LEFT: Grace, as well as balance 
and flexibility, is incorporated into 
Lynn Atkins' beam routine. TOP RIGHT: 
Walkovers are a floor basic for Liz 
Mowatt-Larssen. ABOVE: A side walkover 
on the four-inch beam leaves little 
room for a misplaced foot. RIGHT: Breath- 
taking amplitude adds points on the beam. 



268/Women's Gymnastics 



Teamwork Best inState 



For a team whose success 
was derived from indivi- 
dual performances, the Wo- 
men's Gymnastics Team attribu- 
ted its winning tradition to 
close teamwork. Through pulled 
muscles and bruises the women 
prepared for their third sea- 
son of competition, including 
a nine-day winter training 
session in Florida during 
Christmas break. 

The team, coached by Sylvia 
Shirley, compiled a 9-4 record, 
and qualified for the small 
college Nationals. The Indians 
consistently scored in the 116 
point range, an achievement 



Ms. Shirley attributed 

to the depth and consistency 

of the eight-woman squad. 

Sophomore Jan Roltsch and 

freshman Cathy Dechiara were 

the best all-arounds, with 

Roltsch placing in the top 

three in every meet. Liz 

Mowatt-Larssen, Mary Felt, and 

Debby Heim also contributed strongly. 

Though each meet's outcome 
depends on the girls' indivi- 
dual routines, the girls are 
not alone as they perform. 
Heim stated, "There may be 
only one girl up there at any 
given time, but she knows the 
whole team is right behind her. 



pulling for her." Felt con- 
curred, adding, "If we weren't 
a team, there would be a lot 
of rivalry for a spot on each 
piece of equipment, and that 
would weaken the team effort.' 

The women captured first 
place in the State Champion- 
ships, outscoring Radford by 
a slender .25. Roltsch led 
the squad by claiming Best 
All-Around in Virginia. Un- 
fortunately, Roltsch is re- 
tiring next year because of 
a back injury, but the team 
has plenty of depth and cohe- 
siveness to carry on its 
championship tradition. 




Women's Gymnastics/269 




ABOVE: Straining to achieve maximum 

extension, John Jiganti completes his 

pirouette on the high bar. 

ABOVE RIGHT: Senior Terry Babb's height 

above the pommel horse makes this 

Olympic dismount possible. 

RIGHT: Spotting the mat, Tom Serena 

executes a full twisting double back 

off the high bar as Coach Gauthier looks 



270/Men's Gymnastics 




Excellence Reemphasized 




ff it's a good feeling to 
set your goals high and 
reach them, then the 1978-79 
men's gymnastics team must feel 
pretty good. The team set three 
goals at the outset of the sea- 
son: first, to break the 200 
point barrier, which had never 
been done at William and Mary. 
This meant that each gymnast 
must average a score of 8.3. 
Second, to win the state title 
for the fifth straight time. 
Third, to repeat their 1977-78 
ranking of second in the South. 
The Tribe boasted each of these 
achievements, making 1978-1979, as 
Coach Cliff Gauthier put it, "a 
great season for us." 

At the core of the team were four 
all-around performers: Mason 
Tokarz, Tom Serena, Gary Brue- 
ning, and John Jiganti, repre- 
senting the top four places in 
the state meet. Captain Mason 
Tokarz won the state all-around 
pommel horse and rings competi- 
tions, bringing his four year 
total of state championships to 
fourteen, including at least 
one in each event. Captain Terry 
Babb, a former state title- 
holder on the pommel horse, fin- 
ished third at states, while 
senior Ron Coleman proved he 
was the best parallel bar man in the 
state for the second straight year. 

In dual meets, the Tribe 
proved almost unbeatable, post- 
ing a 13-1 season — the team's 
best ever. The single meet was 
dropped to Navy; however, W&M 
outscored such powerhouses as 
Georgia and Georgia Tech. What 
made the season even more special 
was the fact that the Indians 
had lost ten seniors the previous 
year. 

ABOVE LEFT: A tremendous push off the 

bars enables Doug Borden to complete this 

cut-catch. 

LEFT: Complete muscle control is shown 

by Tom Serena as he performs a V-seat. 



Men's Gymnastics/271 



Past Successes 
Boost Season 



Betsy Frick 
Odette Galli 

nil ton 

thome 

Cynthia Heldt 
Debbie Henley 
Mary Herald 
Mary HoUeran 
Betsy Hundley 
"' ra Kelly 
eLehr 



T aurie McAvoy 
Bather Meldm 
(Jheri Morrison 
Nancy Nowicki 
Nancy Podger 
Cheryl Proscino 
Nancy Read 
Debbie Reed 
Mary St. Thoi 
Susan Shoaf 
Bobbie Tulloh 
Kelly Wagner 
Amy Wright 
Sue Wright 
Hideko Yamaguchi 



I A / ith two seasons of unde- 
VV feated intercollegiate 
play behind them, the members of 
the women's lacrosse team looked 
forward to another outstanding 
year. The 1977-78 team was "the 
strongest team we've ever had at 
William and Mary," according to 
Coach Joy Archer. In seasonal 
play, the Indians were the only 
collegiate team to beat Maryland, 
whose only other loss was to 
Penn State in the finals of the 
National Collegiate Tournament. 

Pixie Hamilton, a junior, was 
named to the U.S. Women's 
Lacrosse Association's reserve 
and touring teams. In March, 
1979, she traveled with the 
team to England, Scotland, and 
Wales. 

Coach Archer worked diligently 
with the 1978-79 team, especially 
with captain Peel Hawthorne, 
Cheryl Proscino, and Heather 
Meldrum. Proscino and Meldrum 
completed four years with the 
team at the end of the 1978-79 
season. 

In her eleventh year as coach, 
Archer noted the phenomenal 
growth in interest in women's 
lacrosse. She said, "Ten years 
ago, we didn't even have enough 
players for two teams." Now 
there are four women's lacrosse 
teams and approximately sixty 
players. 

ABOVE RIGHT: Nationally ranked junior 
Pixie Hamilton follows closely on the 
heels of teammate Hideko Yamaguchi. 
NEAR RIGHT: Backed by Sharra Kelly, 
Cheryl Proscino anticipates a high 
pass. 





272/Women's Lacrosse 




BELOW LEFT: Cradling the ball, Brian 
Johnson searches downfield for a re- 
ceiver. BELOW RIGHT: With a determined 
gleam, Captain Mickey McFadden bums the 
opposition. 




National Status Sought 



t^egaining national ranking 
•* land recognition was the 
immediate goal of the men's 
lacrosse team, according to head 
coach Clarke Franke. In the 
final poll of 1974, the team was 
ranked twentieth in the nation. 




The team's best record, however, 
was 9-4 for the 1976 season. After 
a bad season last year, the team 
attempted to rebuild and recover 
its national ranking, which, said 
Franke, "is not an unreasonable 
expectation." 

In previous years, lacrosse had 
increased its audiences and 
number of teams throughout the 
country. This growth was 
evidenced at W&M as well. Men's 
lacrosse became a year-round 
sport. In addition to the 
regular spring season, the team 
sponsored a fall league consisting 
of four teams and approximately 
sixty players. Varsity and junior 
varsity team members participated, 
as well as other interested students. 



During the winter, an intramural 
league played weekly in Blow Gym. 
In addition, the varsity team 
played in an alumni game at 
Homecoming. 

This year's team was led by 
four captains, all of whom 
logged a considerable amount of 
playing time during their 
four years on the team. After 
two years as assistant coach, 
Franke assumed the position of 
head coach from Al Albert. 
Zandy Kennedy, still an under- 
graduate, served as assistant 
coach. John Cooper, an alumnus 
who was co-captain of the 1977 
team, has served as JV coach for 
the past two years. 



Men's Lacrosse/273 



Many of us, at some time, 
have fantasized 
about being such romantic fig- 
ures as D'Artagnon, Captain 
Blood, or some other such 
swashbuckler, and marveled at 
their greatest talent: master 
swordsmanship. At least this 
one facet of that exciting 
lifestyle remains, though in 
a more refined form, as fen- 
cing. 

Three different types of 
swords are used in fencing, the 
sabre, foil, and epee. The 
squad is comprised of three 
teams of three members, with 
each team specializing in a 
different weapon. The sabre 
team was led by Jay Kuemmerle. 
Tom "Chainsaw" Mayberry and Carl 
Siebentritt rounded out the 
division. K.C. Hart, Kwang 
Choe, and Tim Hurley comprised 
the foil team which was one of 
the strengths of the squad. 
The epee team was made up of 
letterman Hamner Hill and fresh- 
men Don Morris and Bill Spaniel. 

Though they got off to an in- 
auspicious start, losing to Na- 
vy, the Tribe sprang back to 
undo state opponents VPI, UVA, 
Mason, Madison, and Washington 
and Lee to recapture the State 
Cup. The crusade for the Mid- 
Atlantic Championship, however, 
would prove to be a tough one. 
With the team planning on los- 
ing only three of their starters, 
the future indeed looked bright 
for this romantic sport. 



Swashbuckle rs 
Excel Instate 



K. C. Hart 
Kwang Choe 
Tim Hurley 
Hanno Rittne 
Scott Newma 
Hamner Hill 
Don Morris 



Bill Spaniel 

Dedrick Hervas 

Peter Shananhan 

Jay Kuemmerle 

Tom Mayberry— Capt. 

Carl Siebentritt 



ABOVE RIGHT: Arm in air and wrist 
cocked. Coach Conomikes demonstrates 
proper stance. 

RIGHT; Coed dueling provides an outlet 
for an ongoing battle of the sexes. 



274/Men's Fencing 





Women Finesse 
Virginian Foes 



LEFT: The entire blade, not just the 

tip, is a scoring surface in sabre 

competition, 

BELOW LEFT: A simple parry is not always 

enough to discourage a lunging attacker. 



Maureen Dunn 


Eileen Cleary 


Elizabeth Miller 


Jane Boggs 


Fran Hunt 


Crista Cabe 


Linda Neil 


Jennifer Lunday 


Jan Hart 


Paula Palnnore 


Val Kidwell 


Amy Schoner 


Dawn Ferree 


Becky Bowman 


Lisa Thompson 


Debbie Smith 





Fencing was so different, 
I was intrigued," revealed 
freshman Amy Schoner, The 
uniqueness of the sport of 
fencing was one reason for its 
popularity. The freshmen 
female fencers came out in 
such numbers that Coach Pete 
Conomikes formed a "B" squad 
to provide experience and depth. 

Fielding one of the strongest 
teams in years, the Tribe's 
squad boasted last year's 
Virginia State Individual 
Champion Maureen "Moe" Dunn, 
who continued her domination 
of the Old Dominion, Junior 
Elizabeth Miller fenced in the 
number two spot while freshman 
Linda Neil controlled position 
three. Alternating in the 
fourth spot were Amy Schoner 
and Crista Cabe, 

The team hoped to better 
last year's third place finish 
in the State Championships, 
Though they dropped their 
opening match to Navy, the 
women bounced back to defeat 
Virginia and provide stiff 
competition for powerhouses 
Clemson and North Carolina, 

Under the tutoring of Coach 
Conomikes, and the continued 
ability of the sport to attract 
freshman women looking for 
something different, the Tribe's 
future appears bright for this 
and coming seasons. 



Women's Fencing/275 




ABOVE; With her two-handed backhand, Mary 
Catherine Murano rifles a shot cross-court. 
ABOVE RIGHT: Captain and number two seed 
Libba Galloway stretches to reach a passing 
shot. RIGHT: Practice provides the setting 
for Sally Holt to perfect her baseline 
strokes. 



276AVomen's Tennis 




LEFT: After attacking a deep shot, 
Marilyn Riancho turns to approach the net. 



Tracy D 
Susan Foster 
Libba Galloway 
my Holder 
Mindy Holman 
Sally Holt 
Susan Lynn 

Howard 
Julie Jenkins 
Laurie Kazanjian 
Alisa Lamm 



Moll 
Mary Catherine 

Murano 
Marilyn Riancho 
Lynn Russell 
Anne Shoei 
Stacy Steimcj 
Ceci Warrick 
Edle Longenbach 



Looking to Nationals... 



Last spring, after winning 
the State Championship, 
the women's tennis team placed 
a very close third in the Region- 
al Tournament, missing second 
place by a mere eight points. 
Those eight points, however, 
made all the difference, as only 
the top two teams from each 
region are invited to the Nation- 
al Tournament. Ironically enough, 
the two teams that beat out the 
Indians placed first and second 
in the United States. This pro- 
voked speculation about W&M's 
chances at the national level. 
"It could've been us," contended 
Coach Mildred West. 

This year the team set out to 
end the speculation. After grind- 
ing out an undefeated (14-0) fall 
season, the women seemed well on 
their way. The experienced var- 



sity was backed up by an equally 
potent JV squad which was pitted 
exclusively against other schools' 
varsity squads, and, nonetheless, 
wrapped up an undefeated fall 
season themselves. 

Depth was the Tribe's main wea- 
pon as there was little differ- 
ence in the performance level 
between positions one and six. 
Though tennis is considered an 
individual sport, this depth, 
coupled with the close-knit char- 
acter of the team, made each 
match a total team effort. 

The match against the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, which had 
defeated the Indians last year, 
was indicative of W&M's "team 
style" of individual play. After 
dropping the first two single 
matches, the women rallied, and 
won the next three duels, each 



with a full sweep of three sets. 
Maryland struggled back to win 
the final singles match, but 
only after a hard-fought tie- 
breaker. Things looked bad for 
the Indians when they faulted 
and lost their first doubles 
match. But they recovered, 
scoring wins in the last two doubles 
contests for an overall victory. 
The spring season, however, 
was what the team had been work- 
ing toward. With schools like 
Duke, N.C. State, UVA., and Penn 
State on the schedule, the road 
would indeed be tough, but Coach 
West was hopeful in stating with 
a smile, "We are looking to 
place in the top two in the Re- 
gional and go to the Nationals 
in Denver." 



Women's Tennis/277 




Rod Armbruster 


Dan McEachran 


Chris Brady 


Brian Pilgrim 


Paul Daus 


David Smith 


Bill Fallon 


Arthur Taylor 


Mark Giles 


John Van Namen 


Todd Irick 


Tom Winter 


Peter Koloski 


Dave Wong 


John Mann 


Hank Wood 



ABOVE LEFT: After returning a shot, 
Brian Pilgrim analyzes the ball's 
position. ABOVE RIGHT: With his 
eye on the ball, Dan McEachran returns 
a forehand. NEAR RIGHT: Freshman Todd 
Iiick's backhand shows promising form. 



278/Men's Tennis 



Recruitment Adds Depth 




After a challenging fall 
tournament schedule and 
months of rigorous workouts, 
the W&M Men's Tennis team 
swung into their 1979 dual 
meet season with great expec- 
tations. The Tribe turned in 
good performances in three fall 
tournaments, with the younger 
team members gaining valuable 
playing time in the process. 
The Indians beat out Maryland, 
Washington and Lee, and Army 
en route to a fourth place 
finish in the Navy Invitation- 
al, which saw sophomore Paul 
Daus pick up a big win in 
singles over W&L's top man. 
The team then took seventh 
place in a strong field of 
eighteen schools in the ECAC 
tournament at Princeton. The 
highpoint was Johnny Mann's 
advance to the quarterfinals 
in men's singles. In 
early October, W&M hosted the 
first Division One Inter- 
coUegiates, and emerged with 
a third-place tie after two 
days of action on newly 
improved facilities. 

Standout Dave Smith returned 
for the spring season after 
an injury-ridden sophomore 
year to capture the number one 
spot in singles. Other re- 
turning lettermen were ex- 
pected to fill out the top 
five, with the remaining singles 
and doubles positions seeing 
considerable rotation. The 
loss of four top players from 
the previous year's 13-6 
squad made the Tribe a bit 
short on experience, but Coach 
Steve Haynie maintained that 
there was at least as much team 
talent now as in 1978. This 
was due in part to a strong 
recruiting year, which resulted 
in a freshman class described 
by Haynie as the best since 
1974. 

LEFT: His racket lowered, Paul Daus 
scoops a shot from the service box. 



Men's Tennis/279 



First\kar Championship 



I il^lliam and Mary's first 
WW Women's Cross Country 
team exploded this fall to 
capture the State VAIAW Cross 
Country Championship. In accom- 
plishing this, the Indians 
edged out Richmond, who had 
handed them a defeat earlier 
in the season. The Tribe par- 
ticipated in four meets, the 
first of which saw Kathie Ellen 
Scherer finishing first out 
of the Indians, as she was to 
do consistently throughout. 
In the George Mason Invitational 
W&M claimed second place, 
and four women won medals: 
Scherer, Laura Portasik, Capt. 
Joy Kelly, and Laura Sardo. 

At States, the runners came 
on strong to better nine other 
teams. Scherer took fourth, 
Laura Sardo took sixth, Cathy 
Sardo got tenth, and Kelly 
nabbed eleventh place; such 
depth clinched the title. Re- 
gionals were not as successful; 
the women placed a disappoint- 
ing ninth. However, Laura Sar- 
do put forth her best effort 
of the season, and was the 
first Indian to cross the finish 




line. 

Harsher weather signalled the 
arrival of indoor track season, 
but only the meets were held 
indoors. The Tribe still clocked 
the necessary outdoor mileage, 
despite some of the deepest 
snow Williamsburg has seen. 
The indoor track team, consis- 
ting largely of cross country 
veterans, competed in the Lynch- 
burg and East Coast Invitation- 
als. With additional talent from 
fall and winter sports, the 
spring track season promised 
continued success. 

ABOVE RIGHT: Explosive starts enable 
freshman Debbie Younger to be the top 
Indian sprinter. RIGHT: The Tribe's 
workouts at Barksdale field prevent 
injuries from non-resilient pavement. 




280AVomen's Track 










Cathy Sardo 


Jeri Daniels 


Debbie Meek 


Anna Zaborowski 


Kathie Ellen 


Lynn Norenberg 


Scherer 


Nancy Scott 


Laura Portasik 


JoAnne Fenity 


Jane Romanczyk 


Claire LeBlanc 


Jeanne Lull 


Driana Davis 


Laura Sardo 


Tricia Talerico 


Joy Kelly 


Ruth Strauss 


Debbie Younger 


Stacey Puis 


Jan Boehling 


Beth Schuette 


Monique Valenti 





LEFT: Indian runners Joy Kelly, Kathie 
Ellen Scherer, and Cathy Sardo thunder 
down the back stretch at the Eastern 
Invitational. ABOVE LEFT: Out at the 
track, Coach Poffenbarger administers to 
one of the troops as Joy Kelly helps. 
ABOVE: The addition of freshman Anna 
Zaborowski provides the added dimension 
of strength in the field events. 



Women's Track/281 



~'!!'^f 



Potential Pans Out 



The year 1975 was a 
very good one for 
William and Mary track. 
The Tribe won its sixth con- 
secutive state indoor championship, 
its tenth Southern Conference 
indoor title, and placed third 
in the IC4A championship. 

As a result of those accom- 
plishments the Indians were 
able to recruit some of the 
East Coast's finest high school 
athletes. Among these were 
Ail-American milers Mike Hagon and 
Mike Ellington; Rich Stuart, who 
was one of the best shot-putters 
on the East Coast; Rich Rothschild, 



a much sought after half-miler; 
and All-American sprinter Bob 
Keroack. 

"They were all high school 
superstars," reminisced Coach Roy 
Chemock. Truly this was a 
class of great promise. "But 
the promises never came to 
fruition," admitted Chemock, 
who was the Tribe's third coach 
in four years. Why this 
unfulfilled potential? Injuries. 
The Tribe had been plagued with 
injuries for the past four years: 
Hagon broke his foot during his 
freshman year; Stuart broke his 
wrist in his sophomore year; 



Ellington had knee problems and 
Keroack pulled a hamstring .... 
The list went on and on. 

During the spring of 1978, 
however, some of this potential 
began to be realized as the 
Indians took the State Outdoor 
Championship. That meet was 
highlighted by Rich Rothschild 
and Mike Hagon's 1-2 finish in 
the 1500 meters, Drexel George 
and Rich Stuart's 1-2 finish 
in the shot and Bob Keroack's 
first place in the 400 meter 

BELOW: Indoor State Champ Rich Stuart 
unleashes his own brand of fury. RIGHT; 
The Tribe's distance medley works out. 




AT T^Bijj^STERN STATE Invitational, 
Chris Slommski sets the pace for the field. 



282/Men's Track 



i 1 h 

\ ^2 


i^'ill 






J)jL 1 J 




1^^ 


^^l^k. '^W^^^r 




1 ■ 


^^^k 




t -■ 


^^P^ 




1 ■ 


^^^^^m 










i 1 H 


^Pl 1 




ifi 


r\ 1 




..-fc^M 


A Mm 


^^^H< 










^^K^l 






Mark Anderson 


Dave Lieb 


Wendell Barrow 


John Malone 


Chris Benjamin 


Bob Marchbank 


John Berger 


Scott McDonell 


Gene Bruner 


Ira Meyers 


Darryl Burrell 


Tim Miller 


Dan Chen 


Derek O'Neal 


Jim Coogan 


Forrest Palmer 


Mark Damario 


Charles Pedlar 


Tim Dowd 


Charles Phillips 


Rob Duncan 


Art Rawding 


Steve Dye 


Jon Ritson 


Mike Ellington 


Rich Rothschild 


Gary Ellis 


Greg Sampson 


Kevin Ellis 


Tim Schneider 


Alan Gates 


Jim Shields 


Mike Hagon 


Chris Slominski 


Reid Harrison 


Tom Soban 


Bill Helsley 


JeffStillwell 


John Hopke 


Rich Stuart 


Edney Jones 


Pat Warfle 


Mark Jean-Michel 


Nathaniel Wesley 


Bob Keroack 


Dan Zaruba 


Doug Kirkpatrick 





1 


!^ , 


hurdles. Rothschild and Keroack 








went on to qualify for nationals. 




"tt««n«-1i. ■ii'iUM 




After an undefeated but 






.% 


disappointing cross coun- 
try season the Tribe 




-II V""',! -j-^. '" *■-•" . \^ 


^^Fsylf^^^^H 


appeared to be headed for an 




^^^ 




outstanding indoor season. At 
the Princeton Relays the distance 
team of John Hopke, Keroack, 
Hagon and Rothschild took first 
and barely missed qualifying for 
the NCAA championship. At the 




? 


fF^ 


Easterns held in Richmond, Hopke 
and Rothschild won the 1000 meters 




( 


^H^H^^ft 


and mile over stiff national 




1 1 

1 
1 

! 


t 


caliber competition. The highlight 
of the indoor season was the win 
by the two mile relay team of 
Hopek, Hagon, Rothschild and Jim 
Shields in the Milrose Games, 
which is one of the most 
prestigious meets in the country. 
Despite these successes during 
the season the Indians sputtered 
in the State meet, finishing 
fourth; their only first place 
going to Stuart with a throw of 

54'iiy2". 

The spring season, which 
Chemock feels, "may be the last 




^^ v^^K' 1 


\ 


hurrah for William and Mary 
track for one or two seasons," 




J^^ ' 




due to poor recruiting, looks 
promising. The seniors as a 








class will be attempting to 




V-:.- .:,::■'. :. 


* -MW,M| 




MOMENTS AFTER TAKE-OFF, Bob Marchb 


ank 


bring W&M track back to the 




strains to avoid contact with the bar. 


' <H«I 


level of power which will once 
again attract superstars. 










Men's Track/283 



Scholarship 
GrantsNew 



Led by super sophomore Tracy 
Leinbach, the William and 
Mary women's golf team once 
again enjoyed a fine fall season. 
Coach Ann Lambert emphasized, 
however, that although "individ- 
ually it has been a banner year, 
we're still building a team." 
1978 marked the first year 
scholarships had been given to 
women golfers at William and 
Mary, and Lambert, while stres- 
sing that "academics still come 
first," hoped to upgrade the 
women's golf program. 

Leinbach and freshman Mary 
Wilkerson were the individual 
stars of the fall season for 
the Tribe. In addition to 
leading the team with an 81.4 
average, Leinbach won the in- 
dividual title at the State 
Tournament thus making her the 
best female collegiate golfer 
in the state. Wilkerson also 
had an excellent fall, pacing 
the team with an 81.0 average 
until a back injury forced her 
to miss the last four tournaments 
of the season. 

Despite a tough spring schedule 
that included the Duke Spring 
Invitational, the Sweetbriar 
Tournament and the Madison 
Invitational, the team was 
confident. With the return of 
Wilkerson to the line-up and 
Leinbach's consistent play. 
Coach Lambert predicted a suc- 
cessful spring season. 



ABOVE RIGHT: Sophomore Tracy Leinbach 
displays the follow-through of a cham- 
pion. RIGHT: A powerful backswing is 
essential to Mary Wilkerson's game. 



Cathy Allen Linda Siler 

Elizabeth Danahy Debbie Spencer 

Carol Freedman Mary Wilkerson 
Tracy Leinbach 



284AVomen's Golf 





GolfProgram 
Revitalized 



Despite what Coach Joe Agee 
labeled "a rather dis- 
couraging fall," the outlook was 
bright for men's golf at William 
and Mary. Stating "we're em- 
barking on a new era," Agee 
looked forward to an improved 
spring season and a successful 
year in '79-'80. 

A gift of 60,000 dollars over 
a six year period from Mark 
McCormack, president of Inter- 
national Management Corporation 
and a 1951 graduate of the Col- 
lege, enabled the team to offer 
scholarships to promising high 
school golfers as well as current 
members of the team. In addi- 
tion, the introduction of a 
weight-training and running pro- 
gram and the inauguration of a 
new fall tournament, the Kings- 
mill-William and Mary Fall 
Classic, pointed to the revital- 
ization of men's golf at the 
College. 

Although as a group the Indians 
finished 12th among the 17 teams 
in the Madison Tournament and 
34th out of 37 in the Foxfire 
Invitational Tournament at 
Pinehurst, NC, freshman Glenn 
Lapkin and sophomore Bill Timmons 
were individual standouts for 
the Tribe this fall. With the 
addition of sophomore Jim O'Mara, 
a transfer student ineligible 
for fall play, "the line-up will 
be strengthened considerably for 
the tough spring season," stated 



ABOVE LEFT: Inclement weather finds David 
Kast driving indoors. LEFT: A high swing 
by Bill Timmons sends the ball sailing. 



Tom Ansboro 


Scott Nelson 


Len Brooks 


Jim O'Mara 


Gregg DeVine 


Todd Richter 


Dave Kast 


Tripp Sheppard 


Mark Kehoe 


Jim Sulhoff 


Glenn Lapkin 


Bill Timmons 


Greg Minjack 





Men's Golf/285 



New Coach Optimistic 




■-:;; rvi-ji^jSJErf. -- 



Maynard "Mo" Weber may provf 
to be just what the doctor 
ordered for the WiUiam and Mary 
baseball team. After three years 
Ed Jones stepped down from his 
head coaching position to devote 
more time to his ever growing 
duties as Intramural Director 
and professor and was replaced 
by Weber, who had coached base- 
ball at the College back in 1965. 

Last spring the Tribe's re- 
cord was 15-25-2. "We got off 
to a bad start losing our first 
eight games, but played .500 
ball after that," explained cen- 
terfielder Joe Manderfield. 
Contributing to this strong fin- 
ish were 16 lettermen who re- 
turned for 1979. Jim Hoag, af- 
ter an exceptional freshmen year, 
returned to the mound for the 
Indians, and Don Howren and Ken- 
ny Cloud added their big bats, 
along with Brian Moore, Dave 
Hissy, and Dave Blows. 

LEFT: A strong supply of pitching talent 
is crucial to any team. 
BELOW: Senior Joe Manderfield kicks up 
some dust as he rounds the bases. 




286/Baseball 




It was around this nucleus that 
Coach Weber intended to build a 
program which included a J.V. 
team for the first time. This 
gave freshmen a chance to shar- 
pen their skills and step into 
spots of graduating lettermen 
next year. Other changes in- 
cluded 10 less games and also, as 
shortstop Robert Manderfield put 
it, "a new, positive attitude." 

The largest hurdle facing the 
team was the lack of scholarship 
funds. Baseball, being a non- 
revenue producing sport, had a 
total of one full scholarship and 
this placed them in a "challeng- 
ing" position when playing the 
scholarship ladened teams which 
appeared in abundance on the 
Tribe's schedule. Still, with the 
Tribe's new attitude, and new pro- 
grams. Coach Weber feels that "we 
will definitely be competitive." 

LEFT: After connecting on a 3 and 2 
pitch, Terry Havelka races towards first. 



Baseball/287 



BELOW: Anticipation of a pass keeps Patti 
Stevens at the heels of Charrie Hazard. 




UPPER RIGHT: With poised rackets, fresh- 
men Mindy Macauley at net and sophomore 
Susan Pickett await the serve. 
LOWER RIGHT: Gamma Phi Beta and Chan- 
dler Second Floor hoopers look to the 
net for a rebound. 











M 'm 


1 


1 




12 

■HHk - 


n 




^ 


^■^ 












288/Women's Intramurals 




Football New for Women 



/magine yourself walking 
past Yates field on a fall 
day on your way to the Caf, when 
suddenly you hear cheers and a 
referee's whistle. You turn a- 
round just in time to see a 
blond co-ed triumphantly spike 
a football in the endzone after 
catching a long pass . . . 

Surprised? Don't be, because 
scenes like these became almost 
commonplace in front of Yates as 
the Women's Recreation Associ- 
ation integrated flag football 
into its intramural program for 
the first time. "It went really 
well, and wasn't that rough be- 



cause it was flag," commented 
WRA President Mary Ann Wright. 

The WRA reorganized and expanded 
its program, with the help of the 
new faculty advisor Ann Poffen- 
barger, in order to meet the 
growing and diversified wants 
of the women at the College. 
Besides flag football, the 
WRA added canoe racing, outdoor 
soccer, a track meet, racquet- 
ball, and mixed doubles in 
tennis. The program provided 
a break from studies not only 
for undergraduates; this year 
it also included graduate stu- 
dents, law students, and in- 



terested faculty. Ms. Pof- 
fenbarger observed, "It gives 
women a chance to participate 
two or three times a week and 
in this type of school its a 
very important program. 

BELOW: In an attempt to steal the ball. 

Debbie Marsh meets with resistance from 

Debbie Younger in an action-packed flag 

football game on Yates field. 

FAR BELOW: Kappa Kappa Gamma players 

Kristi Esbenson, Cecil Weirick and 

Evelyn Gates contribute to the 

action in a heated women's 

intramural volleyball game. 




Women's Intramurals/289 



The old saying "all work and 
no play ..." was one which 
the William and Mary intramural 
department and a great number of 
students agreed with, as evidenced 
by the increasing popularity of 
the men's intramural sports pro- 
gram. The men's program boasted 
21 sports, including a few like 
horseshoes, squash, billiards, 
bowling, and football. 

The increased popularity of 
this year's program was due in 
part to an increase in soccer 
participation, which was quickly 
becoming one of the most popular 
sports. Newly constructed hand- 
ball and racquetball courts also 
increased interest and added to 
the opportunities for students 
to escape from the library and 




Horseshoes to Hoop 



studying. 

Competition for the fraternity 
points charnpionship also seemed 
to be keener this year. Kappa 
Sig, Lambda Chi, and Sigma Nu 
looked to provide strong chal- 
lenges. Kappa Sig won the all- 
college football crown for the 
third straight year, a new re- 
cord, and Mark Gardner, a Lambda 
Chi, won the placekicking cham- 
pionship. 

The diversity of the intramural 
program gave most students 
the chance to leave the books 
or the library, and head for the 
courts, the pool, or the field 
in search of a little fun, a lit- 
tle exercise, and perhaps a taste 
of glory. 

RIGHT: During a pickup hoops game, Eric 
Barnes puts the pressure on Jim Syma- 
nowski. 




290/Men's Intramurals 




^%-..jlL 


t <H,'W«t. . /^^^^ ^^^^ 


. 





^^F 




ABOVE LEFT: Kappa Sig Bobby Aiken's 
charging figure puts the Dupont "Best of 
the West" team on the defensive. 



ABOVE RIGHT: Freshman MaA Brandt 
rushes the ball in a soccer match held at 
the JBT field. 



ABOVE: The handball courts at Blow Gym 
provide a positive outlet for Bill Mims 
and Mike Apostolou. 



Men's Intramurals/291 




292/People 





ifferent types of indivi- 
duals lived and worked in 
the William and Mary community. 
Some showed outstanding academic 
ability; others showed artistic 
talent. Still others showed 
commitment to a cause or personal 
popularity. But whatever the a- 
bility, the talent, or the in- 
terest, each was an individual 
entity, necessary to the College 
community. 

1979 was a different type of 
year for each of these individu- 
als. For some it was their last 
year; for others, their first. 
For some it was a year of a- 
chievement; for others, a year of 
adjustment. But for all, 1979 
was a year of living, working, 
and playing in a small, college 
atmosphere. And for those that 
remained, it was a time to ques- 
tion the future of William and 
Mary and ask which direction it 
would take. 



People/293 




294/Classes 



ACTIVE AND INTERESTED 




Senioritis" was the term 
for that so-called feel- 
ing of disinterest and apathy 
among graduating seniors. For 
the senior, the thought of an- 
other class, test, or paper 
made even the strongest want to 
shudder. But despite this, the 
senior class held an active in- 
terest in college life. For ex- 
ample, those seniors more aca- 
demically inclined wrote honors 
theses or researched honors pro- 
jects to augment their college 
studies. Those more interested 
in student life led student gov- 
ernment, edited student publi- 
cations, or chaired student or- 
ganizations. Those with athle- 
tic abilities participated in 
varsity and intramural sports, 
and those of an artistic nature 
performed in theater and music 
productions. 

Although senioritis seemed to 
pervade each graduating class, 
it was only a superficial phe- 
nomena. Deep down, most seniors 
still felt the need or desire to 
actively participate in the Wil- 
liam and Mary community. 



I'PPER LEFT: A unique tradition is main- 
tained by seniors as well as underclass- 
men in the Queen's Guard. 
LEFT: Every ounce of strength is pushed 
to its limit by runner Mike Ellington. 
ABOVE: As president of the senior class, 
Margaret Nelson plans and coordinates all 
senior class activities during the year. 



Seniors/29.5 



*****1t********************-k**-kil-k***irii-k1t*-t,1r*-li***-t!*1iit*ir-k*1i-trir1t* 



AARON, NANCY GRACE, Chatham. 
French. Delta Delta Delta; Circle K; 
Tennis; BSU; Young Americans for Freedom; 
Pi Delta Phi; Escort; Panhellenic Council 

ABBEY, ELLEN FAYE, Richmond. Bio- 
logy. Chi Omega; Hockey; Track; Women's 
Rugby Club. 

ABERNATHY, SUE ELLEN, Richmond. 
Elementary Education. Kappa Alpha 
Theta, Activities Chairman, Assistant So- 
cial Chairman; Kappa Delta Pi, Vice 
President; Pi Kappa Alpha Little Sister, 

ACKERMAN, WARREN KEITH, Hopewell. 
Economics. Pi Kappa Alpha. 

ACORS, CARROLL LEROY, Gloucester. 
Anthropology /Psychology. Anthropol- 
ogy Club, President; Psychology Club. 

ADAMS, GWENDOLYN PATRICIA, 
St. Thomas, V.I. Urban Studies. BSO. 

ADAMS, TERESA MATTOX, Lynchburg. 
History, 

ADKINS, CARLA FAY, Petersburg. Fine 
Arts (Studio). Student Art Show; 
William and Mary Review. 

ADLER, KENNETH JAY, Williamsburg. 
Psychology. Dorm Council; Theta Delta 
Chi; IFC; Committee for Center 
for Psychological Services; Psychology Club. 
AHMED, KARIM H., Nairobi, Kenya. 

English/French. SAC, Chairman; Presi- 
dent's Aide; International Circle, Vice 
President; Interhall Appeals Board, Chair- 
man; Dorm Council; Committee on 
Self-Governance; College-Wide Committees; 
OA; Orientation Assistant Director. 
AILSTOCK, ROBIN SHELLEY, Virginia 
Beach. Business Management. Delta 
Delta Delta. 
AKRIDGE, MELANIE JOYE, Ozark, AL. 
Economics. BSU. 

ALDRICH, SUSAN POYTHRESS, Dennis, 
MA. English. WATS; Alpha Lambda Delta. 

ALEXANDER, GREGORY CREASON, 
Newport News. Education. 

ALLEN, CATHY MICHELE, Rocky Mount, 
NC. Philosophy. Golf; WM-NCAA Volun- 
teers for Youth, Director; RA; Housing 
Selection Committee; Washington Program 
Steering Committee; Athletic Policy 
Committee; President's Aide; Philosophy 
Club; Intervarsity; Cambridge Program; 
Mortar Board. 

ALLEN, EMILY DIANE, Bon Air. Business 
Administration/Management. Colonial 
Echo: WATS. 

ALLEY, JUDY L., Norfolk. Elementary 
Education. Dorm Council; Kappa Delta. 

ALLIN, CATHERINE ANN, Arlington. 
History. 

ANDERSON, GLENN EDWARD, Lexington. 
English/Biology. Swim Team, Co- 
Captain. 

ANDERSON, ROBIN BETH, Cincinnati, 
OH. History/French. Alpha Chi Ome- 
ga; Phi Alpha Theta; Pi Delta Phi; HSO; 
OA; Rush Counselor; French House; WMCF. 

ANTONACCI, CAROL MARIE, Ridge- 
wood, NJ. History. Asia House; Phi Alpha 
Theta; PIRG. 

ARNOLD, CAROL A., DeWitt, NY. Econo- 
mics. Kappa Kappa Gamma, Assis- 
tant Treasurer, Treasurer; OA; SA, Trea- 
surer; Omicron Delta Kappa, President. 

ARNOT, SUSAN E., Verona, NJ. History. 
Phi Mu, House Manager, Recording 
Secretary, Reporter; Phi Alpha Theta; HSO; 
OA; Cambridge Program; Senior Class 
Publicity Chairman; Pi Lambda 
Phi Sweetheart. 

ASHFORD, PHILIP C, Lorton. Economics. 
Flat Hat. Photography Editor; Colo- 
nial Echo, Photography; WMTV; 
Society of Collegiate Journalists; Project 
Plus; Drop Designs. 




296/Seniors 



****** 



LIBRARY LOUNGING 



*********** 




ASHOOH, PETER WILLIAM, Alexandria. 
Government/Philosophy. Pi Lambda 
Phi. Steward; IFC; Karate Club; WCWM, 
News: Escort. 

AUSTIN, ALVIS GERALD, JR., Roanoke. 
Biology /Psychology. Circle K; Hotline; 
Lutheran Students Association; 
RA; Head Resident; Phi Eta Sigma; 
Phi Sigma. 

AVERETTE, ALICE MAREE, Charlottes- 
ville. Psychology/Music. Mortar 
Board, President; Kappa Kappa Gamma, 
Pledge Trainer; Dorm Council; Band; 
Evensong. 

AVILES, JOHN MATTHEW, Kings Park, 
NY. Biology. Football. 

AYASH, JAIME GIRO, Lisbon, Portugal. 

Government. International Circle; 

French House; Pi Delta Phi; Intramural 

Soccer. 
BABB, TERRENCE ELLIOTT, Ivor. 

Biology. Gymnastics; BSU, President; 

Choir; Intramurals; NCAA. 
BAGLEY, PATTIE HARGRAVE, Ken- 
bridge. Government. Chi Omega; Tennis. 
BAILEY, MARY-PAULA, New York, NY. 

French. Pi Beta Phi; Pi Delta Phi; Orchesis; 

DA. 



* * * * 



***** 



******************** 



* * * * 



***** 



****** 



The eyes were weary, 
drooping. The low dron- 
ing buzz around the ears, hard 
wood support, white cinderblock 
wall, and progressively merging 
coefficients of the fifth con- 
secutive page of solid chemistry 
equations provided nothing more 
than a sedative, blurred effect. 
The intermittent, subtle 
screeching of a highlighter 
illuminating a page somewhere 
even failed to serve as an 
adequate stimulant. Suddenly 
footsteps were detected ap- 
proaching the carrel. A 
massive effort in self-re- 
straint had to be exerted to 
keep the eyes glued to the 
x's instead of casting a 
quick glance to seek the 
possibility of a familiar 
face coming down the aisle. 
Anything to break up this 
monotony — and you suddenly 
realized a study break was 
the only answer. Heading 
straight down to the first 
floor, a brief (or not-so- 
brief, depending on how 
advanced the stage of 
frustration) respite was 
found in the comparatively 
plush, relaxing atmosphere 
of the lobby. 

Library socializing was one 
successful method of dealing 
******n********** 




with the dilemma of too many 
assignments, books, pages and 
panics contained within the 
walls of Earl Gregg Swem. 
A vow not to return home be- 
fore 11 p.m. (or until 30 
more pages had crossed 
your eye's path, hopefully 
somewhat coherently) was 
more easily fulfilled knowi; , 
that someone down there would 
give you moral support, or at 
least a little small talk 
to pass the time. 

The prime time for social- 
izing seemed to lie somewhere 
between 9:30 and 10 p.m., the 



breaking point after a good two 
to three hours of brain-drain- 
ing since dinner. Different 
students approached break time 
in different ways. Type A had 
no qualms about making his 
leisure obvious — on couch, 
sprawled out, shoes off, feet 
propped, he possessed no guilt 
feelings in taking a little 
time off. "I've worked hard — 
speed-read 340 pages of econ, 
struggled through five pages 
of stats problems, added 100 
3-syllable nouns to my Russian 
vocabulary, and wrote a letter 
to Mom. I deserve a break, and 



***** 



****** 



*********** 



************ 



Seniors/297 



LIBRARY LOUNGING 



******( 



BAILEY, SUZANNE LEE, Fairfax. 
Elementary Education. 

BAIN, NANCY KATHERINE, Crozet. 
Biology/Sociologv-. Marching Band; 
Mermettes: Evensong; Biology Club, Trea- 
surer: Sociology Club. 

BAKER, CATHERINE ANNE, Edina, 
MN. English. Flat Hat; Megacycles; 
Tutoring. 

BAKER, HAROLD, St. Paul, MN. Busi- 
ness Administration. Swim Team; In- 
tramurals; Dorm Council. 



BAKER, KATHRYN LOUISE, Houston, 
TX. French. Alpha Lambda Delta; Pi Del- 
ta Phi; French House; Junior Year Abroad. 

BALL, STEPHEN EDWARD, Northport, 
NY. History. Kappa Sigma; Intra- 
murals; WATS; HSO. 

BARBOUR, CHRISTOPHER, Hampton. 
Urban Studies/History. 

BARRON, ANNA FEWELL, Rock Hill, 
SC. English. Chi Omega; OA; Flat 
Hat; Circle K. 




********** 



*********************** 




ANDY STEINBERG breaks the barriers 
conversing over a carrel. 



dammit, I'm taking one," 
commented one delirious student. 
Type B used a time element 
factor as opposed to accomplish- 
ment in determining a basis for 
establishing his break time. 
He simply synchronized his 
watch with two or three others 
and met them on the blue couch 
in the left rear comer at 
9:43 p.m. This method proved 
successful for the less inde- 
pendent, more structure- 
oriented student. However, 
it was warned that this might 
have been a deterrent in terms 
of accomplishment while at the 
desk, as stated by another 
Earl Gregg regular: "I find 
myself getting too anxious and 
excited about the break. I 
spend the half hour before 
the specified time looking at 
my watch every five minutes." 
An extremely opposite approach 
to the first type was taken by 
Type C. Choosing a chair, 
sitting upright, feet flat, 
book open, he pretended to 
studiously and thoughtfully 
outline his notes. It has not 
yet been proven whether this 
type actually believed he was 
studying or was merely attempt- 
ing to project this impression. 
Regardless of the facts, he 
displayed a surprised reaction 



when a friend happened to 
interrupt his concentration 
(sitting there in the middle of 
the lobby) but reluctantly 
allowed himself five minutes of 
conversation (usually subject 
to expansion). 

Not all library socializers 
fell into the three afore- 
mentioned categories. There 
were those who found relief in 
the "campus phone." They 
called a roommate or friend, 
reported that they were still 
"sticking it out," and inquired 
about the status of dorm life. 
Others found no need to revert 
to the lobby and bravely 
initiated conversation over 
the carrel or the aisle. These 
socializers were, however, 
subject to reprimanding glances 
from the hard-cores. Finally, 
the very efficient socializer 
killed two birds with one stone. 
Forming "study groups," he got 
together with others from a 
particular class and discussed 
notes "so as to verbalize the 
material and be certain we 
haven't missed any important 
elements." 

Whatever the method, library 
socializing provided a soothing, 
supportive crutch to the all- 
too-often over-exerted mind. 



»♦♦♦♦* 



♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 



1^ « » « « 



♦»»♦»♦» 



************* 



298/Seniors 



(CONTINUED) 




*******-k**i,ir1,*-k***-),1,i,i,-t, 



BARROW, GREGORY STEPHEN, Roanoke. 
Biology, Lambda Chi Alpha, Rush 
Chairman; Rugby. 

BARRY, JAMES P., Alexandria. German. 
Band; Choir; Dorm President; Interhall; 
Project Plus, Vice President; Sigma 
Chi, Tribune, Scholarship Chairman, So- 
cial Projects Chairman; Mortar Board, 
Vice President; OA, 

BARTHOLOMEW, GREGORY TUREK, 
Vienna. Government/English. WBRS; 
BSU Glee Club; William and Mary Re- 
view, Publicity Director; Flat Hat: 
Choir, Phi Mu Alpha; Exeter Pro- 
gram; Queen's Guard. 

BARTLETT, NANCY LEE, Fairfax Station. 
Elementary Education, RA; Phi Mu; 
Kappa Delta Pi; WMCF, 

BATCHELOR, JOYCE LYNN, Chantilly, 
Economics. Evensong; Badminton; Dorm 
Council, President; Circle K, 

BEACH, CHARLES STEPHEN, Alexandria. 
Mathematics/Computer Science. 

BEAN, MEREDITH LEE, Arlington. 
History. Young Life Leadership; Phi Alpha 
Theta; WMCF. 

BEARD, DIANE MARIE, Fairfax. Business 
Management. Phi Beta Kappa Ora- 
torio; William and Mary Review. 

BECK, MARJORIE HELEN, West Palm 
Beach, FL, History. Alpha Chi Omega, 
President; Delta Omicron; Chorus; 
Choir; Sinfonicron; OA; Sigma Chi Sweet- 
heart; Canterbury Association. 

BELL, ALISON, Montgomery, AL, 
Fine Arts/Art History. Women's 
Forum; Theater. 

BELL, KATHERINE V„ Williamsburg. 
English. Kappa Alpha Theta. 

BELL, THOMAS L., Williamsburg. Physical 
Education. Queen's Guard, Command- 
er; Ranger Company; PE Majors Club, 
Vice President; Intramurals; Scab- 
bard & Blade Society; Distinguished Mili- 
tary Student; Rifle Team. 

BENNETT, RICK, Charlotte, NC. 
Economics. 

BENTLEY, NORA JANE, Annandale, 
Psychology/Fine Arts. Alpha Chi Omega; 
Flat Hat: William and Mary Review, 
Art Editor; Psychology Club; Biology Club; 
Canoe Club; Bacon Street. 

BERDY, JEROME ALBERT, St. Peters- 
burg, FL. Sociology. Asia House; Sociology 
Club. 

BERGER, JUDITH ANN, Union, NJ, 
Business Management. Intramurals. 

BERRY, LESLIE MARIE, Norfolk, Biology. 
Women's Rugby Club; Dorm Council; 
Circle K. 

BERTHIAUME, DENISE LORD, Hunt- 
ington, NY. English. 

BEVERLY, CAROL CRAIG, Roanoke. 
Biology. 

BINARI, STEVEN CHARLES, Alexandria. 
Physics. Sigma Chi. 



BISHOP, BETH FRANKLIN, Richmond. 
Elementary Education. Phi Mu, 
Corresponding Secretary, Panhellenic 
Representative; Panhellenic Council; 
Orchesis, Costume Chairman; "To Form A 
More Perfect Union." 

BLACK, PAMELA ANN, Hackensack, NJ. 
History. Orchesis; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

BLACKBURN, DAVID ALLEN, Pulaski. 
Business Administration. Theta Delta Chi, 

BLACKMAN, DOUGLAS EDWARD, Pit- 
man, NJ. Biology. Sigma Chi, Rush 
Chairman, President; College-Wide Com- 
mittee on Scheduling; Biology Club; 
Wesley Foundation; "Track, Cross Country. 



***** 



Seniors/299 



»♦♦»»♦♦»♦»♦ 



* • * ♦ » 



♦ ♦»»*^t^t»»»»»»»»»» 



»»♦»♦* 



» » • » » 



******* 



*************************************************** 




Springtime at William and 
Mary was more than a sea- 
son; it was an attitude. With 
the arrival of warm weather, 
certain changes took place on 
the campus and in the students. 
The crepe myrtle and dogwood 
began to bloom, and the 
blossoming azalea bushes 
transformed Yates path into a 
wonderland of color. 

The Sunken Gardens became 
the site of much activity, 
including impromptu frisbee 
games and more organized 



events such as dorm volley- 
ball games and cookouts. An 
unknown flutist filled the 
air with haunting melodies, 
competing with the strains of 
an inspired pianist wafting 
from Ewell Hall. 

One of the most common 
sights around campus from 
March until the end of the 
school year was that of bodies 
stretched out on towels at any 
of the many campus "beaches.' 
The presence of textbooks 
close at hand proved that 



W&M students studied con- 
stantly, or at least pre- 
tended to. 

For many, springtime also 
brought thoughts of summer: 
the local pool, the beach, 
European excursions, summer 
jobs, and for some, summer 
school. Thoughts of future 
plans occupied the minds of 
the seniors as they looked 
with mixed emotions towards 
the day when they would be- 
come alumni of William and 
Mary. 



♦ ♦ * ♦ ♦ 



♦ »♦♦♦*»»♦■» 



¥ ♦ ♦ * ♦ 



¥**♦♦» 



¥»♦»♦»*♦»»♦ 



♦ »*»»»» 



BLAIR, GEM E., Hampton. Biology. WMCF; 
Biology Club. 

BLANKENBAKER, KIMBERLY, Charlottes- 
ville. Geology. Intramurals; Evensong; 
Alpha Lambda; Sigma Gamma 
Epsilon, President. 

BLEDSOE, TERESA JEAN, Springfield. 
English/Psychology. Dorm Council; 
Alpha Lambda Delta. 

BODIE, ELLEN. Hampton. English. Chi 
Omega, Rush Chairman, Vocations; Circle 
K; Music Library Aide; OA; English 
Club; Cambridge Program. 

BORTNER. PETER ERNEST, Berwyn, 
PA. Government. Flat Hat, Sports Editor; 
Wesley Foundation; WMCF; Pi Sigma 
Alpha, Secretary; College Republicans; 
Dorm Council; Intramurals; Society of 
Collegiate .Journalists. 

BOSTIC, PATTI GAIL, Lynchburg. 
Accounting. Accounting Club; Senior Publi- 
cations Committee. 

BOWEN, LU ANNELLE, Roanoke. Econo- 
mics/Government. Chi Omega, Treasurer; 
Steering Committee for Washington 
Program; Young Democrats. 

BOWEN, MARGARET CAROLE, Danville. 
Accounting. 




300/Seniors 



♦ »»•*♦»■» 



SPRINGTIME 



*********** 



****** 



* * * * * 




IFW!^f1 



BOWMAN, J. IMRIE, III, Virginia Beach. 

History. Dorm Council, President; Kappa 

Alpha, House Manager, President; 

Lacrosse, Captain; RA; Advisory Board. 
BOWMAN, REBECCA ANNE, Vienna, 

Spanish. Fencing; Spanish House; Sin- 

fonicron Costumer; Sigma Delta Pi; 

Junior Year Abroad; Chorus. 
BOYLE, DOROTHY JEAN, Ridgecrest, CA. 

Fine Arts. Science Fiction Club, 

Vice President; Mutant, Editor, 
BRADSHAW, MICHAEL KEITH, Franklin. 

Business Management. Honor Council; 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Concerts Committee. 

BRAGG, RANDY L., Richmond. History. 
Intramurals. 

BRANSCOM, GEORGIA KAY, Fincastle. 
Economics/Philosophy. Omicron Del- 
ta Epsilon; Phi Mu; Virginia Bankers 
School of Bank Management. 

BRANTLEY, JOHN DAVIS, Annandale. 
History. Sigma Chi; Gymnastics, 

BRAUN, THOMAS GERARD, Blauvelt, NY. 
Biology. Wrestling, Captain; Phi Sigma; 
Intramurals; Catholic Student Asso- 
ciation; Omicron Delta Kappa. 

BRESEE, LINDA ANN, Newport News. 
Business Administration/Management. 
Circle K Tutoring; Cheerleading, 
Captain; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

BREWSTER, GEORGIANA LYNN, Arling- 
ton. Geology. Little Sigma; Pi Beta 
Phi; Karate Club; Campus-Wide Environ- 
ment Committee; Geology Honor Society. 

BROCKWELL, PATTIE JEAN, Colonial 
Heights. Business Administration/Manage- 
ment. Kappa Kappa Gamma, Inner- 
Social Chairman; SA, Secretary; OA; Orien- 
tation Committee. 

BROOKS, BRIAN GERARD, Raleigh, 
NC. Biology /Economics. Biology Club; 
Economics Club; Student Advisory 
Committee; Dorm Council; Scuba Club; 
College Republicans. 

BROWN, ALISON MARY, Shepperton, 
Middlesex, United Kingdom. Business 
Administration. International Cir- 
cle; Badminton; Drapers' Scholar. 

BROWN, GERALD JAMES, Burke. 
Economics. Board of Student Affairs, 
Finance Chairman; Athletic Policy Com- 
mittee; Theta Delta Chi, Secretary; 
Intramurals; Parents' Day Weekend, Stu- 
dent Chairman. 

BROWN, ROBERT EVERS, JR., Jackson, 
NJ. Economics. Economies Club, President; 
Dorm Council; Intramurals; College 
Bowling League. 

BROWN, SUSANAH BRANCH, Arlington. 
Fine Arts. Freshman Dorm Council; 
Tennis Team; Gamma Phi Beta, Assistant 
Social Chairman. 

BROWNING, TERI LEANNE, Fairfax. 
Sociology. Project Plus; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma, Vice President, Public 
Relations. 

BRYANT, ROBERT HARRISON, Richmond. 
History. Canterbury, Officer; Evensong; 
Sigma Chi; Sinfonicron, "H.M.S. 
Pinafore." 

BUCHWALTER, SUZANNE LOUISE, Fair- 
fax. Biology. Dorm Council, Secre- 
tary/Treasurer; Delta Delta Delta; Band; 
Orchestra; Biology Club. 

BUFFON, KATHLEEN ANN, Mystic, 
CT. Fine Arts/Art History. 

BUHRMAN, MARTHA ANN, Richmond. 
French/Psvchology. Kappa Alpha Theta. 

BUMGARDNER, GINNY L., Arlington. 
Biology. Alpha Lambda Delta, 
President; French House, Vice President, 
President; Biology Club; Pi Delta Phi; Mor- 
tar Board; Omicron Delta Kappa; Phi 
Sigma, Vice President; Spanish House; 
International Circle. 

BURNETT, STUART RUTLEDGE, Charles- 
ton, SC. Psychologv. Sigma Chi. 

BURNS, MARTHA ANN, Pawtucket, RI. 
English. Alpha Lambda Delta; Alpha Chi 
Omega. 



Seniors/301 



AREA COORDINATOR 



****** 



BUSBIN, SHARON KAY, Yorktown. 
Psychology. Circle K. 

BUSCH, BARBARA JEAN, Kokomo, 
IN. Business. 

BUXTON, ROBERT LESLIE, Virginia 
Beach. History. William and Mary Social- 
ists; Senior Newsletter. 

CALLAS, GEORGE DEAN, Cresskill, 
NJ. Accounting. Accounting Club; 
Football; Fellowship of Christian Athletes. 



CAMBERN, THOMAS MAYNARD, Spring- 
field. Economics/Music. Phi Mu 
Alpha Sinfonia, President; Omicron Delta 
Epsilon; Sinfonicron; Orchestra; Band. 

CAMPBELL, HEIDI LOU, Bonn, West 
Germany. History. Honor Council; 
SA senator; Lacrosse; Fellowship of 
Christian Athletes, Vice President; Dorm 
Council; HSO; Uncle Morris; Colonial 
Echo, Photographer. 

CAMPBELL, KATHRYN LYNN, Lawrence- 
ville. Biology. Circle K. 

CARMAN, LAURA LYNNE, Farmingdale, 
NY. Music. Delta Omicron, Presi- 
dent, Warden, Chaplain; Mortar 
Board, Secretary; Sinfonicron, Cast, 
Musical Director; Chorus; Choir; 
Botetourt Chamber Singers; Alpha Lambda 
Delta; Lutheran Student Association. 



CARR, GARY PEYTON, Alexandria. 
Government. Pi Beta Phi; Sigma Pi 
Sweetheart. 

CARTER, DANIEL EDWARD, Fair- 
fax. Business Administration. 

CARTER, JAMES TALMADGE, Rocky 
Mount. Economics. Baseball, Captain; BSU. 

CARTER, MARIE BETH, Newport 
News. Computer Science. Chemistry Club; 
Evensong. 



CARWILE, NANCY LYNN, Lynchburg. 
Sociology. Orchestra; Asia House. 

CASPER, NELDA DIANE, Richmond. 
Music/Physics. Hockey; Chorus; 
Choir; College Concert Series Committee; 
Delta Omicron, Treasurer. 

CASS,- EDMUND FRANCIS, m, Lynch- 
burg. Government. Dorm Council, 
President, Senator; Honor Council; In- 
tramurals; Order of the White 
Jacket" SA 

CASSANOS, ELLEN, Richmond. Govern.. 
ment/Psychology. Phi Mu; RA; OA. 



CASSON, DONALD DAVIS, JR., Easton, 

MD. Accounting. Theatre; Band, Concert, 

Marching. 
CAUFIELD, MONA PAIGE, Danielson, 

CT. Economics. 
CEWE, JOHN D., Alexandria. 

Government/Economics. 
CHADWELL, ELAINE, Falls Church. 

Chemistry/Biology. WMCF; Chemistry 

Club; Evensong. 



CHAPMAN, ADRIAN PHILIP, Fairfax. 
Economics. Pi Kappa Alpha; Execu- 
tive Council; Intramurals; Project Plus. 

CHASE, MICHAEL BERTRAM, Kil- 
marnock. Religion. Kappa Alpha, 
Officer; Canterbury Association, President. 

CHRISMAN, DAN ALVIN, JR., Roanoke. 
Chemistry. Choir, Vice President; Theta 
Delta Chi. 

CHRISTENSEN, GARTH ALAN, Virginia 
Beach. Business Administration/Accounting. 




302/Seniors 



jt********* 



********* 



******* 




AREAT:0«DINAT0R TOM NANZIG whizzing by 
on his bik( 3 a common sight on campus. 



CHRISTMAN, KEITH ILIN, Williams- 
burg. Chemistry, Golf; FCA; Volunteers 
for Youth. 

CIAVARELLI, LINDA MARIE, Ridge- 
field, CT. Chemistry/Biology. Band, 
Concert, Marching; Flat Hat. Sports; 
Dorm Council; OA; Mortar Board, 
Treasurer; Phi Sigma; Chemistry Club. 

CLARK, WILLIAM DAVID, Petersburg. 
Physical Education. Sigma Pi; 
Swim Team; Intramurals. 

CLATTERBUCK, DEBORAH ANN, Front 
Royal. Psychology. Circle K; 
Psychology Club; OA; Rush Counsellor; 
Phi Mu, Rituals Chairman; Scholar- 
ship Committee. 

********************* 

1 

Among the staff at the ' 

College were a number of ] 

persons pledged with the duty > 

of maintaining a semblance of ' 

"law and order" in dorm life. ' 

Certainly among the most diffi- , 

cult of these jobs was that of ' 

Tom Nanzig, area coordinator for ' 

Yates and Dupont. Accurately , 

describing Tom's duties was > 

virtually impossible as they ' 

ranged from advising students, , 

settling disputes, and lending i 

out kitchen utensils, to prose- ' 

cuting vandals, opening locked ' 

doors, and driving students to , 

pumpkin patches to buy Holloween ■ 

decorations. A favorite activity ' 

of Tom's in his multi-faceted , 

job was the judging of dorm -wide > 

trivia contests based on the old ' 

TV game show. Jeopardy." A , 

trivia buff himself, Tom presided i 

over these contests which became ' 

extremely serious and competitive | 

as they progressed. , 

Aside from these various activ- ^ 

ities, most important about Tom ' 

was the 24-hour concern he showed , 

for students. His strong desire > 

for student input on all levels ' 

was the driving force in sue- , 

cessful dorm activities, > 

general consensus on area ' 

policies, and an easy going [ 

atmosphere in the area. , 



♦•»»♦•••♦»»•» 



♦♦♦»»♦♦♦»♦•»•»♦♦ 



♦ *»»*•»*♦¥*¥¥¥*¥♦♦*»»* 



**■¥*** 




CLEMMER, JANE BROWN, Fort 
Defiance. Biology. Chorus; Cheerleading, 
Co-Captain; Delta Delta Delta, 
House President. 

CLEVELAND, GLENNA HART, 
Waverly. Education. 

COAD, BRL\N DOUGLAS, St. Louis, 
MO. Urban Studies/English. Wil- 
liam and Mary Theatre; Director's Work- 
shop; Prem.ier Theatre; Intra- 
murals; Fencing; Junior Year Abroad; 
Theta Delta Chi. 

COATES, JO ELLEN, Madison Heights. 
Anthropology. Anthropology Club; 
Dorm Council; Phi Mu, Reporter, 
Standards Chairman. 



Seniors/303 



******** 



******* 



GREETING CARDS 

************************************************** 




THE TANTALIZING MERCHANDISE of 
Parlett Plaks captures Felicia Boyd's eye. 

DO you ever feel like 
browsing in a unique kind 
of shop, one that carries un- 
usual and enchanting gifts? 
Discover Parlett Plaks. On 
entering the shop, the tinkling 
of wind chimes and the aroma of 
incense convinces you that this 
is a special place. Tantalizing 
merchandise waits for you in 
every corner. Each time you 



turn, something new catches 
your eye or stimulates your 
imagination. Mobiles float 
effortlessly overhead, and 
stained glass ornaments sparkle 
in the window. Chimes play 
softly, and new scents excite 
the nose. 

In this enticing setting, 
Parlett Plaks offers a diverse 
range of gifts. Everything 
from greeting cards to cooking 
utensils are there to tempt the 
customer. The store has 



posters, doll furniture, can- 
dles, and jewelry; it also 
offers figurines, scarves, 
soaps, and decorative boxes. 
For the imaginative buyer, 
Parlett Plaks has endless 
possibilities. 

But, whatever you see and 
experience, you will want to 
return to Parlett Plaks. 
Again and again you will find 
that special and unique gift 
for that special and unique 
occasion. 



:^^,f^^:f.^,f:fi^^ifififif.ififif,fif.,t^******* 



*****.****.******if.**if.if********* 



COCHRAN, MARK ANDREW, Clarksville, 
MD. History /Philosophy. Dorm 
Council; Young Democrats; SA Volunteer; 
Intramurals; WMCF; Catholic Stu- 
dents Association. 

COCHRAN, ROBERT JAMES, Hampton. 
Business Administration/Accounting. Spa- 
nish House. 

COFER, SUSAN DAVIS, Richmond. 
Computer Science. Chorus; Choir; Intra- 
murals; Band. 

COLEMAN, BLAINE, Vienna. 
Government. 



COLEMAN, RONALD BRUCE, Rumson, 
NJ. Physics. Gymnastics; Sigma Chi. 

COLLINS, ROHLAND DEWITT, Hampton. 
History. College-Wide Committee on 
Lectures; Project Plus; Young Democrats; 
Phi Alpha Theta; HSO. 

COLLINS, STEVEN E., Staunton. 
Mathematics. College Republicans; Circle K 
Tutoring; Escort. 

CONNERTON, MICHELE ROBERTA, Alex- 
andria. Biology. Phi Sigma; Alpha 
Lambda Delta; French House; Biology 
Club; Intramurals. 




304/Seniors 




♦»******** 



COPAN, WILLIAM DAVID, JR., Williams- 
burg. Economics. Intramurals; Circle K. 

COPLEY, PAUL ANDREW, Lynchburg. 
Business/Accounting. 

CORRELL, NANCY ELIZABETH, Franklin. 
Computer .Science. ACM. 

CORYDON, LESLIE A., Allendale, NJ. 
Interdisciplinary. Gamma Phi Beta; Inter- 
national Circle; WRA; Colonial Echo, 
Index Editor; Junior Year Abroad. 



COUPAL, JONATHAN MARK, Herndon. 
Government. Student Senate; Inter- 
hall; Dorm Council, President. 

COWARD, ANNE W., Williamsburg. 
Environmental Design. Alpha Lambda 
Delta; Gamma Phi Beta; Circle K; Colonial 
Echo. 

CRAIG, JOHN HANSSEN, Annandale. 
Government. Intramurals. 

CRAMER, HARLAN CARL, Alexandria. 
Chemistry/Economics. Escort, Director. 



CREEDON, PETER J., Smithtown, NY. 
Psychology. Pi Lambda Phi. 

CRITTENDEN, RONALD S., Wilhamsburg. 
English. 

CRITTENDEN, ROWENA BARRON, 
Annandale. Biology. WMCF; Swim Team; 
Intervarsity. 

CROOKS, JULIE CLAIR, Wyckoff, NJ. 
English. Phi Mu, Vice President, Recording 
Secretary, Sunshine Committee; News- 
letter, Homecoming, Social Programs 
Committee; Evensong; Chorus; Dorm 
Council. 



CROSS, LISA, Geneva, Switzerland. So- 
ciology. Pi Beta Phi, Rush Chairman, 
Philanthropies Chairman; Sigma Chi Sweet- 
heart. 

GROSSMAN, ANN HEATHER, Vero 
Beach, FL. Colonial American Studies. 
Wesley Foundation; Kappa Delta, 
Historian, Rush Chairman. 

CROUCH, BRIAN DALE, Springfield. 
Chemistry/Mathematics. 

CULLEN, JOSEPH PATRICK, Hampton. 
Sociology. RA; Cross Country; Catholic Stu- 
dent Association; Phi Eta Sigma; Collegiate 
Civitans, President; Mortar Board. 

CUMMINS, REBECCA LYNN, Williams- 
burg. Business/Management. Kappa Alpha 
Theta, Assistant Treasurer; Intramurals. 

CUSTER, SCOTT MEREDITH, Roanoke. 
Economics. FCA; Lambda Chi Alpha; 
Intramurals. 

DACALES, CRAIG SPERO, Alexandria. 
Biology /Psychology. 

DAHL, DEBRA MARIE, Staunton. Fine 
Arts. Phi Mu; William and Mary Review. 

DAHLMAN, NANCY MITCHELL, Virginia 
Beach. Government/Fine Arts. Chi 
Omega, Historian, House President; OA; 
College Republicans, Alpha Lambda 
Delta; Sigma Iota Chi. 

DALTON, KATHERINE SCOTT, Richmond. 
Chemistry. Alpha Chi Omega; Assis- 
tant Student Liason to the Board of Visi- 
tors; Athletic Policy Committee; 
BSU; Chemistry Club; College Republicans 
Club; Panhellenic Council; President's 
Aide; Mortar Board; SA Senator; OA; RA. 

DARLEY, SUSAN ELAINE, Chesapeake. 
Elementary Education, Kappa Delta 
Pi; Chorus. 

DARNTON, REBECCA ANN, Mansfield, 
PA. Geology. Alpha Chi Omega; 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon, Secretary. 



Seniors/305 



************* 



* * * * 



***** 



SAL'S ITALIAN 



DAUSSIN, MICHELE MARIE, Clifton. 

English. 
DAVIDSON, TIMOTHY C, London, 

England. Economics. International Circle; 

Italian House. 
DAVIS, LINDA ANN, Salem. Business 

Management. Dorm Treasurer; OA; Pi 

Kappa Alpha Little Sister; Phi Mu, 

President; Homecoming Court. 
DEGIORGIO, ELVIRA ANN, Lynchburg. 

Elementary Education. OA; Kappa 

Delta Pi, Treasurer; Kappa Delta. 



DEGNAN, MAUREEN, Chesapeake. 
Business Administration-Management. RA. 

DEJARNETTE, JEANNE L., Gladys. Anthro- 
pology. Anthropology Club. 

DELANEY, MARY SHANNON, Virginia 
Beach. Government. Swim Team. 

DEMBINSKI, THOMAS J., Middleburg. 
History. 



DEMPSEY, WILLIAM HENRY HI. Short 
Hills, NJ. Economics. Wrestling; 
Sigma Chi, Rush Chairman; Dorm Coun- 
cil; Evensong. 

DENNIE, DAVID LAWRENCE, Glen Allen. 
English/Psychology. Flat Hat, Writer, 
Production; William and Mary Review; 
Young Democrats; Chess Club; WesFel. 

DENNIS, GLENN MICHAEL, Martinsville. 
Business Administration/Accounting. 
Kappa Alpha, Social Chairman; 
Intramurals; Accounting Club. 

DESAMPER, KIMBERLEE, Williamsburg. 
Physical Education/Biology. Track; 
PE Majors Club; Student Athletic Trainer; 
Pi Beta Phi. 




********** 



*******************«*******************************^ 



The hungries have hit. 
Nothing will satisty 
you but a big, chewy, cheesy, 
hot pizza from Sal's Italian 
Restaurant. Already your mouth 
is watering. You can just taste 
the chewy crust, the gooey cheese, 
the spicy tomato paste, and 
the smoky sausage of a Sal's 
sausage pizza. The question is, 
can you make it to Sal's before 
hunger overcomes you? 

Sal's is the ultimate place 
to find good Italian food in 
Williamsburg. It offers thick 
chewy pizzas with all your 
favorite toppings. It also 
has hot, meaty submarines and 
delicious ItaHan dishes with 
plenty of pasta, savory tomato 
sauce, and meat. And for salad 
lovers, Sal's offers a luncheon 
salad bar and dinner salads. 
Like its pizzas, submarines, and 
Italian dishes, a salad at Sal's 
boasts lots of good ingredients. 

Hunger is no longer a problem 




at Sal's Italian Restaurant. 
With its fine Italian cooking, 
you are promised a great meal 
anytime. Even if hunger has 
not hit, one look at those 
delicious pizzas and one whiff 



JEFF RUPP, MARGARET 
NELSON, Ian Mackay and Arthur 
Moseley find Sal's a refreshing 
change from ordinary Caf fare. 

of their tantalizing aroma will 
persuade you to put off that 
diet until tomorrow. 



*♦♦♦»»»♦♦»**»»♦*»♦*»♦••**♦**•♦♦♦»•»♦♦♦*♦♦»♦*****♦*»********* 



306/Seniors 



RESTAURANT 





************* 



DEWANDEL, MARK STEVEN, Virginia 
Beach. Philosophy. Swim Team. 

DEWILDE, MARY KIM, McLean. Biology. 
Chi Omega; Phi Sigma, Secretary; 
Pi Kappa Alpha Little Sister; Alpha Lamb- 
da Delta; Spanish House; Tennis. 

DEYOUNG, MICHAEL WILLIAM, Fairfax. 
Government. Dorm Council; Residence 
Hall Life, SAG; Queen's Guard; WMCF; 
Intramurals. 

DLAZ, JENNIE, Springfield. History/An- 
thropology. Asia House; Anthropology 
Club; HSO, Secretary. 



DICK. THOMAS AARON, Winchester. 

Business Management. Lambda Chi Alpha; 

Intramurals; Wrestling, Co-Captain; 

NCAA Volunteers for Youth Participant. 
DIGGAN, ANN RENEE, HughesviUe, PA. 

Business Administration/Management. 

Badminton; Dorm Council. 
DINARDO, MARY ELIZABETH, Virginia 

Beach. Business Management. Alpha 

Chi Omega; Hockey; Circle K; Italian 

House; Intramurals. 
DIROSA, TERESA JOSEPHINE, Norfolk. 

Government. WATS, Co-Coordinator; 

Circle K. 

DODSON, SHARON ELAINE, Staunton. 
Sociology. WATS. 

DOSS, JOSEPH K., McLean. Government. 
Parachute Club. 

DOWNEY, JOAN DANAHER, Roanoke. 
Biology /English. 

DOYLE, MARGARET M., McLean. Govern- 
ment. Band; Chorus; Chi Omega, Pledge 
Trainer; Phi Alpha Theta; Alpha 
Lambda Delta. 



DOYLE, MICHAEL JOSEPH, Mantoloking, 
NJ. Biology. Phi Kappa Tau, Social 
Chairman, Treasurer; RA; Rugby Club; SA 
Film Series, Assistant Director. 

DRESELY, DONALD KEVIN, Springfield. 
Physics. RA; Intramurals; Colonial 
Echo; Wesley Foundation, Council Member; 
CAMU Representative; Theater; Staff 
Advisory Council. 

DREYER, DIANE MARIE, Roanoke. 
Elementary Education. OA; Chorus; Wes- 
Fel; Alpha Chi Omega, Informal Rush 
Chairman. 

DUDSON, PAULINA KIM, Frankston 
Victoria, Australia. History. Inter- 
national Club. 

DULLAGHAN, MATTHEW PETER, Wil- 
mington. English/Philosophy. Choir, 
Historian; Theater; Flat Hat; French House; 
Pi Delta Phi; Fencing; WMCF. 

DUNBAR, MARGARET RANDOLPH, 
Richmond. Economics. Chi Omega, Secre- 
tary, Personnel; Pi Delta Phi; Lambda 
Chi Alpha Sweetheart. 

DUNCAN, ROBERT CLYDE, Woodbridge. 
Government. Track; Theta Delta Chi; 
Student Activities Council; Who's Who 
Among American College Students; 
Government Club. 

DUNN, ROBERT CARTER, Fairfax. 
Government. OA; Intramurals. 

DYER, CHARLOTTE ANNE, Blacks- 
burg. Economics. Golf; Dorm Council. 

DYER, RAYMOND DOUGLAS IH, Blacks- 
burg. Chemistry. Golf; College Repub- 
licans; Intramurals; Theta Delta Chi. 

EARLY, LELA KATHERINE, Gaffney, 
SC. English. SA Senator; College-Wide 
Committee on Discipline; Senior Class Vice 
President; College Republicans; 
Washington Program; Ferguson Publishing 
Seminar; Phi Mu, Chaplain; Pi Kappa 
Alpha Little Sister. 

EASTON, BRIAN. Oxford, MD. Govern- 
ment/Economics. Choir; Kappa 
Alpha, Rush Chairman. 



Seniors/307 



********** 



******* 



************* 



UNITED 



***** 



******* 



********************************************* 



After living at William and 
Mary for awhile, you soon 
begin to appreciate a very 
necessary item — money. There 
are always the washing machines 
to feed or the blue books to 
buy. Better yet, there is 
always the Wednesday night 
Deli run to make. Unfortunately, 
the money for such necessities 
does not last long. Weekly or 
even daily you must dip into 
your summer savings or your 
parents' allowance. Luckily, 
United Virginia Bank is there 
to help. 

UVB, with its main branch on 
Merchant's Square, offers the 
William and Mary student a wide 
range of financial services to 
make life easier. Besides 
providing checking and saving 
accounts, money orders, and 
traveler's checks for the 
student, UVB has walk-in and 
drive-in windows on Prince 
George Street. Also, for 




convenient banking, UVB 
maintains weekday hours until 
6:00 P.M. and Saturday morning 
hours. And, to make access to 
a branch easy, UVB has seven 
locations in Williamsburg to 
choose from. 

It seems natural for the 
William and Mary student to 



UVB'S DRIVE-IN SERVICES provide even 
greater convenience to students. 



bank at UVB. With its many 
services, locations, and banking 
hours, it is the ideal place to 
keep those important and ever- 
useful dollars. 



»♦♦»*•»♦♦♦♦ 



»»•*♦♦♦♦*♦»»♦ 



«««««««««*«««*4»«« 



«««««««««« 



• ♦♦¥♦• 



EATON, MARY ELIZABETH, Warrenton. 
Psychology. Alpha Lambda Delta; 
Psychology Club; Young Democrats; 
Evensong; SAC Representative; OA. 

ECCARD, DONNA LEE, Huntingtown, 
MD. Spanish. Kappa Kappa Gamma; Al- 
pha Lambda Delta; Sigma Delta Pi; 
Majorette. 

EDGERTON, AMY ELIZABETH, Williams- 
burg. Business Administration. Pi 
Beta Phi. 

EDMISTON, KIM DUNNE, Martins- 
ville. Elementary Education/Mathematics. 
Chi Omega; Circle K. 



EFFORD; RICHARD EDWIN, Amelia. 
Sociology. Lambda Chi Alpha; Baseball. 

EGGERTON, JOHN SANSOM, Springfield. 
English. Basketball Manager; Intra- 
murals. 

EISENHAUER, SUSAN MARIE, Fairfax. 
Business Management. Phi Mu, Assis- 
tant Rush Chairman, Treasurer. 

ELIUM, SANDRA LEE, Lynchburg. Busi- 
ness Administration/Management. 
Historical Society; HSO. 



ENGLERT, LEE ANN, Springfield. 
English. 

ENNIS, APRIL DAWN, Springfield. Bio- 
logy. Alpha Lambda Delta; RA, Dis- 
missal Board. 

EPSTEIN, JOSEPH KANTER, Hampton. 
Psychology. OA; Hillel, President; Psycho- 
logy Club 

ESTES, MARY SUE, Richmond. Biology. 
OA; WATS; Pi Beta Phi; Mermettes; 
Panhellenic Council. 




308/Seniors 



VIRGINIA BANK 



• **■****** 



************ 




ETHERIDGE, ELLEN WISE, Chesapeake. 

Theater/Speech. Chi Omega; Theater; 

Little Sigma. 
EURE, FAY ELIZABETH, Pittsburgh, 

PA. Mathematics. Rugby; Swim Team 

Manager; Chorus. 
EURE, SAMUEL LEE, JR., Kingsport, 

TN, Government. BSD; Intramurals; 

Queen's Guard; Scabbard and Blade; Dorm 

Council; Cheerleading. 
EVANOW, PETER S., Crabapple Cove, 

ME. Business Management. OA; Spanish 

House, President; Intramurals; RA; 

WCWM: Theta Delta Chi. 

EVANS, GERALD MEREDITH, H, Matoaca. 
Chemistry. 

EWING, VIRGINIA RANKIN, New Orleans, 
LA. Fine Arts. Chi Omega; OA; Track. 

FABER, BETH LYNN, Richmond. Chemis- 
try/Psychology. Swim Team; Mer- 
mettes; Panhellenic Council, Vice President, 
Secretary; Kappa Kappa Gamma; RA; 
Chemistry Club. 

FABRIZIO, JOAN MARIE, Buena Vista. 
Western European Political Studies. 
Pi Beta Phi, Pledge Class President; SA; 
Lacrosse; Junior Year Abroad. 



FAHEY, NANCY LEE, South Bend, IN. 
French/History. Gamma Phi Beta: 
ROTC; Scabbard and Blade; Alpha Lambda 
Delta; Pi Delta Phi; Swim Team. 

FARLEY, PAGE ALLISON, Dayton, OH, 
Psychology. Pi Beta Phi, Social Chair- 
man; Senior Class Committee, Civic, Social. 

FAULS, MEREDITH ANNE, Richmond. 
Government. WMCF, Fellowship Co- 
ordinator; Lacrosse; Canterbury; 
Pi Delta Phi. 

FENTRISS, BEVERLY ANN, Danville. 
Computer Science. Residence Hall Com- 
mittee; Graduation Committee. 

FERGUSON, ANNE ELIZABETH, Roanoke. 
History/Philosophy. Kappa Delta, 
Standards Board; Volleyball. 

FERGUSON, ELIZABETH MARIE, Mend- 
hay, NJ. Chemistry. Swim Team; 
Diving Team; Dorm President; RA; Circle 
K; CSA. 

FINERAN, LAWRENCE ALAN, Alexandria. 
Foreign Affairs/Economics. RA; Wes- 
ley Foundation; College Republicans; 
Navigators; HSO. 

FINK, LOIS HOPE, Oakton. Computer 
Science. Karate Club; ACM. 



FIORAMONTI, WILLIAM EDWARD, Falls 
Church. Accounting. Sigma Chi; French 
House. 

FISHER, DAVID GEORGE, Falls Church. 
Biology. Wrestling; Circle K; Intra- 
murals. 

FITZGERALD, ANN ELIZABETH, Gretna. 
Economics. Phi Mu; WATS; OA. 

FITZGERALD, FRANK MOORE, Grand 
Ledge, MI. History. Flat Hat; Society 
for Collegiate Journalists. 

FITZPATRICK, DENISE ELIZABETH, 
McLean. Biology/Geology. WRA; 
Catholic Student Association; Spanish 
House; Basketball. 

FLEMING, DOUGLAS LEE, Hemdon. 
Sociology/Religion. Phi Eta Sigma; Alpha 
Kappa Delta. 

FLEMING, KELLIE WINGFIELD, Durham, 
NC. Human Growth and Development. 
Phi Mu; Biology Club. 

FLETCHER, PAUL EDWIN, III, Ft. Lauder- 
dale, FL. Government/English. Pi 
Kappa Alpha, Secretary, Pledgemaster; 
WCWM; Colonial Echo: Society for 
Collegiate Journalists; Pi Sigma Alpha; 
IFC, Secretary; OA; Spanish House; 
Intramurals. 



Seniors/309 



»»•»♦»»»» 



»♦»»♦»»»♦»»» 



SENIOR PROFILE 



FLOURNOY, CYNTHIA ANN, Houston, 
TX. Mathematics. Phi IVIu. 

FLOYD, CYNTHIA ANN, Lynchburg. 
Accounting. Kappa Delta, President, 
Membership Chairman; Chorus; Alpha 
Sigma Gamma. 

FLYNN, RICHARD J., Plainview, NY. 
Government/Philosophy. 

FORD, JOHN B., Rochester, NY. Econo- 
mics/French. Band, Marching, Concert; 
Escort; French House; Dorm Council; 
Intramurals; WMCF. 



FORRESTER, SHARON ANNE, Blackstone. 

Fine Arts. Alpha Chi Omega, Float, 

Rush Chairman. 
FORTNER, STEVE WILLIAM, Newport 

News. Biology. Pi Kappa Alpha; IFC. 
FOSTER, JAMES JULIUS, Annandale. 

Physics/Math. Dorm Council; Intramurals; 

Phi Eta Sigma. 
FRANCIS, NANCY ANNE, Lyndonville, 

NY. Mathematics/Computer Science. 



FRANZEN, CHARLES RICE, Alexandria. 

History. Asia House; Project Plus; 

Young Democrats; Flat Hat; Phi Alpha 

Theta. 
FREEDMAN, CAROL ANN, Lorain, OH. 

French/Linguistics. Golf; Gamma Phi 

Beta; French House; Pi Delta Phi. 
FREELING, M. THERESE, Fredericksburg. 

Mathematics/Computer Science. 

ACM; Women's Soccer Club; Intramurals. 
FROOM, JANET DLANE, Rockville, MD. 

Theater/Speech. Theater; Director's 

Workshop; Premiere Theater. 



FULLER, NANCY L., Salem. Government/ 
Philosophy. 

FULTZ, PAULA GAIL, Newport News. 
Elementary Education. Chorus. 

GALBREATH, KAREN HUNTER, Ridgeway. 
History/Spanish. Dorm Council; Stu- 
dent Activities Council; Sigma Delta Pi; 
International Circle; Spanish House; OA. 

GALLOWAY, ELIZABETH AGNEW, 
Greenville, SC. History. Kappa Kappa 
Gamma, Scholarship Chairman; 
Tennis; Phi Alpha Theta. 



GAMBER, CAYO ELIZABETH, Quezou City, 
Phillipines. Spanish/English. Inter- 
national Circle; Landrum Treasurer; Junior 
Year Abroad; English Club; Dorm 
Council; Student Advisory Board. 

GARNER, VICKEY LEE, Portsmouth. 
Elementary Education. Kappa Delta Pi. 

GARRISON, CHERYL ANN, Amherst. 
Psychology. 

GATES, BENTON EARL, m, Columbia 
City, IN. Historv. Wesley Foundation; 
Phi' Alpha Theta, Historian; Alpha Lambda 
Delta; Phi Eta Sigma; HSO; WMCF; Dorm 
Council; Project Plus. 

GEDETTIS, JEAN ELLEN, Bridgewater, NJ. 

English. Catholic Student Association; 

Director's Workshop; Theater; College 

Repubhcans; Escort. 
GEORGE, SUE ELLEN, Lorettsville. 

Biology. Biology Club; OA. 
GIBSON, PATRICIA KATHLEEN, Long 

Beach, MS. History. Project Plus; 

Junior Year Abroad. 
GIFT, JEFFREY SCOTT, Richmond. 

Chemistry. Fellowship Christian Athletes; 

Track; Swim Team; Lambda Chi Al- 
pha; RA. 




310/Seniors 



****** 



******************************* 



******** 



*********** 



* * * * * 




GILLEY, GLENN ROY, Williamsburg. 

Business Management. Karate Club. 
GILSTRAP, JOHN THOMAS, Springfield. 

History. Choir; Botetourt Chamber 

Singers; Dorm Council; Project Plus; Phi 

Mu Alpha Sinfonia. 
GIORGI, JACQUELINE ANN, Chesapeake. 

English. 
GLENN, JANE SIOBHAN, Colts Neck, NJ. 

English. Gamma Phi Beta, Pledge 

Director; Dorm Council, President; OA; 

Circle K; Intramurals. 



************** 



****** 



BETH SMITH finds a smooth transition at 
W&M. 

For most, freshman year was 
filled with changes and 
adjustments in just about every 
« area of living. But it only 
" took a while for some to settle 
^ into that nice, easy, comfort- 
¥■ able routine, more commonly 

* known as "a rut." 

* Not so for Beth Smith. Just 



watching life pass her by was 
something Beth avoided quite 
successfully. In 1977, Beth 
transferred to the College 
from a Georgia girls' college 
to pursue a degree in history. 
Admittedly, she knew that 
changing schools would be an 
adjustment, but Beth decided 
that a William and Mary degree 
was a definite advantage in the 



job market and good preparation 
for graduate work. 

The transition went smoothly, 
and Beth quickly became another 
W&M student pushing toward 
her goals. Yet she realized 
there was "life after college," 
and made plans for that inevi- 
table time. Since Beth be- 
lieves "you can't be afraid to 
try things and take advantage 
of opportunities," she responded 
to an opportunity to work in 
England following her early 
graduation in December. Since 
working and traveling abroad 
was something she had wanted 
to do for some time, she grab- 
bed the chance. "If you want 
to do something, try for it. 
If you don't get it, at least 
you know you tried, and you 
have nothing to regret." 

So after obtaining a work 
permit, Beth was off to England 
in March to work for a British 
corporation for six months. 
She then planned on coming back 
to the States to enter gradu- 
ate school, and hoped eventu- 
ally to end up doing historical 
research. She realized it 
wouldn't be easy, but to her, 
"... it's important just to 
know I can do what I want to 
do." 




GLOCK, PATRICIA ANN, Fairfax. English. 
Kappa Alpha Theta, Assistant Rush 
Chairman, Commissary Chairman; OA; 
Circle K. 

GLOTH, FRED MICHAEL, Baltimore, MD. 
Chemistry/Biology. Wrestling; Rugby; 
Intramurals; Campus Ministry. 

GOCHENOUR, ANNE S., Fredericksburg. 
Psychology/Fine Arts. Dorm Council. 
President; Interhall; Lacrosse; Food Ser- 
vice Committee; Campus-Wide Com- 
mittees; RA, Head Resident. 

GOEHNER, CAROL J., North Syracuse, 
NY. Psychology/Sociology. RA; Colonial 
Echo, Photography. 



Seniors/311 



• ♦»*»♦♦• 



********** 



»»♦♦»»»»» 



CASEY'S 



**♦**•*** 



GORGES, KATHRYN ANNE, Easton, CT. 
Mathematics. OA; Society of Collegiate 
Journalists; Director's Workshop; 
Colonial Echo, Section Editor. 

GOSS, DENISE M., Hampstead, NH. 
English. William and Mary Review, Edi- 
tor-in-Chief, Layout Editor; English 
Club. 

GRAHAM, MARK ANDREW, Pulaski. 
Classical Studies. Pi Kappa Alpha; Circle 
K; Lutheran Student Association; 
Intramurals. 

GRAHAM, PETER MICHAEL, Boca Raton, 
FL. Psychology. Intramurals; Theta 
Delta Chi, Co-Social Chairman. 

GRANT, JOHN BRUCE, Annandale. 
History/Economics. Circle K; Sigma Nu, 

GRAY, JOANN COLLIER, Richmond. 
Chemistry/Biology. Chemistry Club; Young 
College Republicans; Intramurals. 

GREEN, WALTER TAYLOR, West Point. 

GREENE, PATRICIA LYNN, Wise. Environ- 
mental Studies. Women's Forum, 
Coordinator. 



GREGORY, WILLIAM CARSON, Case City. 

Business Management/Accounting. 
GREIWE, TIMOTHY ALAN, Norfolk. 

History/Sociology. Sigma Chi; Circle K; 

Catholic Student Association; Dorm 

Council. 
GRESHAM, LINDA JANE, Richmond. Bio- 
logy. Pi Beta Phi, Corresponding Secretary. 
GRITTON, JOHN M. KENT, Newport 

News. Anthropology/Geology. Kappa 

Psi Beta; Intramurals. 



HABICH, CAROL ELIZABETH, Farming- 
dale, NY. Psychology. Alpha Chi 
Omega, Assistant Treasurer; Psychology 
Club. 

HAIRSTON, BIRDIE ANN, Martinsville. 
Accounting. Delta Sigma Theta; BSO; 
WATS. 

HALBOHN, DEBORAH ELLEN, Mahopac, 
NY. Music. Delta Omicron; Sinfonicron. 

HALES, ROSEMARY ANN, Colonial 
Beach. Business Administration/Manage- 
ment, Phi Mu, Assistant Treasurer. 



HALL, JENNIFER AMOENA, Williamsburg. 
History, Project Plus; Forum Advisory 
Committee; Biology Club, Secretary; Phi 
Alpha Theta; History Club. 

HALL, STEPHEN R., Mineola, NY. Ac- 
counting. Pi Lambda Phi; Accounting Club. 

HALLER, KIMBERLY JEAN, Williamsburg. 
Biology/Comparative Literature. 
Theater, Backdrop Club; Asia House. 

HALPERT, ARTHUR LEE, Kensington, MD. 
Accounting. Omicron Delta Epsilon; 
Society for Collegiate Journalists; Flat 
Hat; WCWM; Circle K; Intramurals. 

HAMMER, KEITH WILBUR, West Orange, 
NJ. Business Management. Dorm 
Council; WMCF; Intramurals; Student 
Patrol. 

HANEL, JERI ELLEN, Lynchburg. Physical 
Education. RA; Intramurals; History 
Club; Dorm Council. 

HANLON, KATHLEEN ANN, Smithtown. 
Business Administration/Manage- 
ment. Dorm Council; Badminton. 

HANSEN, JANETTE ELIZABETH, Mana- 
hawkin, NJ. Geology/Government. Gamma 
Phi Beta; College-Wide Environ- 
ment Committee. 




312/Seniors 



**************************** 



***** 



*********** 



*********** 



HARDING, WILLIAM E., Richmond. 

Elementary Education. Swim Team; Theta 

Delta Chi. 
HARHAN, MARGARET ANN, Woodstock, 

NY. Government. Biology Club; Circle K. 
HARLLEE, ROBERT WILLIAM, Atlanta, 

GA. Biology/History. Swim Team. 
HARRIGAN, RICHARD ALLEN, Wyckoff, 

NJ. Psychology. Pi Kappa Alpha, 

Rush Chairman; Psychology Club. 




Casey's Department Store 
is indispensable to the 
William and Mary student. 
There, he or she can discover 
a wide variety of clothing, 
gifts, and accessories at 
reasonable prices. For that 
special occasion, the Campus 
Shop offers the coed the latest 
in name brand junior clothing. 
There are long and short dresses 
for formal wear, coats and 
sweaters for the cold winter 
months, rain wear for the 



typical Williamsburg weather, 
and sportswear for every 
occasion. The department 
store, too, offers a wide 
range of possibilities. The 
student can find any type of 
men's apparel in the men's 
department. For Mom, the 
student can select from a 
wide range of gifts and 
housewares. For himself, the 
student can buy the latest in 
shoes, boots, and sandals. 
And for that little brother or 



»»»♦♦*♦♦♦»♦•»♦♦♦»»♦»»♦»***»♦¥*♦*♦♦»» 




THE ATTRACTIVE EXTERIOR of Casey's 
is demonstrative of the fine quality 
of service and merchandise it offers 
to students. 



sister, Casey's offers colorful 
and carefree clothes and toys. 

So, for that special gift or 
that special occasion, visit 
Casey's Department Store. 
There, the student can always 
find the best and widest 
selection at the most reason- 
able prices. 



HARRINGTON, GREGORY PHILIP, Alexan- 
dria. Chemistry. Orchestra; Phi Eta 
Sigma; Alpha Lambda Delta. 

HARRINGTON, WILLLAM PATRICK, 
Yonkers, NY. English. Basketball; Kappa 
Sigma; Intramurals; English Club; 
Spanish Club; WATS. 

HARRIS, DAVID CAVEN, Roanoke. Geology. 
Lambda Chi Alpha, House Manager; 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon; Intramurals; Or- 
der of the White Jacket. 

HARRIS, JEFFREY WILSON, Germantown, 
TN. Economics/Philosophy. Sigma 
Chi; Swim Team; Honor Council. 



Senior8/313 



♦ »»»»»»»♦♦»•♦♦»♦**••» 



AN OCCASION 



HART, BRIAN KENNEDY, Rochester, NY. 

Chemistry. Theta Delta Chi; Track; RA; Phi 

Eta Sigma. 
HART, KARL C, Flushing, NY. Economics. 

Fencing, Captain; French House; Inter- 
national Circle; Theta Delta Chi, Co-Rush 

Chairman; SA. 
HARTMANN, DORAMARY CYNTHIA, Suc- 

casunna, NJ. Psychology. Circle K; 

Psychology Club. 
HARVEY, TIMOTHY RAY, Lynchburg. 

Physical Education. PE Majors Club; OA; 

College Republicans; Pi Lambda Phi, 

Secretary, Vice President. 

HATCHER, PERNIE CAROL, Big Island. 
History/English. Colonial Echo. 

HAWTHORNE, WOODROW TUPPER, Rich- 
mond. PhysicsAlathematics. WCWM; Flat 
Hat; WMCF; Society of Physics Students, 
Society of Collegiate Journalists; Circle K; 
Project Plus. 

HAWVER, BARBARA J., Alexandria. Govern- 
ment. Flat Hat, Advertising, Production 
Manager; Society of Collegiate Journalists; 
Project Plus. 

HAY, MARY AVELLA, Dallas, TX. Business 
Administration. Cheerleading; Flat Hat; 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Panhellenic Council, 
Social Chairman, President; OA. 




********** 



* * * * 



************************************ 



******* 




An occasion to sample 
different cultures, see 
fine craftsmanship, and hear 
good music was waiting for 
anyone who ventured onto 
Merchant's Square for Wil- 
liamsburg's annual An Occa- 
sion for the Arts. 

Cancelled last year because 
of rain, An Occasion for the 
Arts kept up a frantic and 
lively pace this year despite 
ominous forecasts of rain and 
a few raindrops. For those who 
attended, it was a memorable 
experience. Besides a beer 
garden, folk dancing, and 
numerous other types of 
entertainment. An Occasion 
for the Arts included ex- 
hibits and all manner of 
arts and crafts. Pottery, 
glass, paintings, furniture, 
and jewelry lined the square 
giving the student, the 
resident, and the visitor a 
chance to window shop, buy 
gifts or just enjoy a free 
afternoon. 

An Occasion for the Arts 
was special for those who 
attended. It was a unique 
way to relax, shop, and en- 
joy a Sunday afternoon. For 
Williamsburg and the College, 
An Occasion for the Arts was 
truly an "occasion." 



♦»»♦•♦»»»♦♦»»♦»♦»» 



♦ ¥•*♦♦»»» 



»**»»» 



» » * ♦ ♦ 



♦ *»**»»•»»♦ 



314/Seniors 



******* 



******* 



******* 




^tL as^ 



HAYNIE, GAYLE WINTERS, ReedviUe. 
Elementary Education. 

HECKER, JANENE, Newport News. 
Biology. Biology Club. 

HELDT, CYNTHIA ANN, Wilmington, DE. 
Chemistry, Hockey; Lacrosse; Gamma Phi 
Beta, Scholarship Chairman, House Presi- 
dent; Chemistry Club, Vice-President. 

HELLMAN, JOHN ROBERT, Staunton. 
Business Management. Intramurals; Sigma 
Pi, Treasurer. 



HENDERSON, DIANA ELIZABETH, Alex- 
andria. English/Philosophy, Sinfonicron; 
Theater, Backdrop Club; Delta Omi- 
cron; Mortar Board; Director's Workshop; 
Alpha Lambda Delta, Philosophy Club. 

HENDERSON, MARK JOSEPH, Alexandria. 
Biology. WCWM; Biology Club; Circle K. 

HENRY MICHAEL CHIP, Warrenton. 
Biology. Kappa Alpha, Intramural Director, 
Assistant Rush Chairman. 

HERMANSDORFER, SUSAN E., Char- 
lottesville. French/ Art History. Circle 
K; Alpha Lambda Delta; Pi Delta Phi. 

HEYSER, MARYANN, Richmond. Elemen- 
tary Education. Circle K; Dorm Coun- 
cil, President; L-5 Society; Student Edu- 
cation Association; Delta Delta Delta, 
Marshal. 

HICKEY, DAVID JOSEPH, South Salem, 
NY. Economics. IFC: Kappa Alpha. 

HICKEY, KATHLEEN ANN, Newport News. 
Russian Studies. OA; Delta Delta Delta; 
Rush Counselor; L-5, Board of Di- 
rectors, Secretary; Orchesis, Vice President. 

HIGGINBOTHAM, ANN ADAIR, Vienna. 
Psychology/Education. Delta Delta 
Delta; RA; Cheerleading; Intramurals. 

HIGGINS, LINDA SHAWN, Springfield. 

English. Premiere Theatre; William 

and Mary Review: Women's Forum. 
HELL, LINDA LEA, Norfolk. Biology. 

Mermettes; WMCF, Core Group Leader. 
HINES, MARC CAMBRIDGE, Suffolk. 

Business Administration. Lambda Chi 

Alpha, Treasurer; Rugby. 
HINTZ, STEVEN JEFFREY, Cherry Hill, 

NJ. English/Philsophy. Pi Kappa Alpha; 

Flat Hat. 



HIRSCHI, KATHY LYNN, Richmond. 
Philosophy/Government. SA, Vice President 
for Cultural Events, Speaker of the SA 
Senate, Senator; SAC, Chairperson' 
BSA, Representative, Ad-Hoc Committee 
on Reorganization of Student Govern- 
ment; OA; RA. 

HODGE, DEBORAH LEE, Springfield. 
Economics. Pi Beta Phi, Assistant Rush 
Chairman, Panhellenic Representa- 
tive, Secretary; Intramurals. 

HOLLAND, WILLIAM ROBERT, JR., Roa- 
noke. Physics. Phi Eta Sigma; Sigma 
Pi Sigma; WMTV. 

HOLMES, AUDREY DALE, Providence 
Forge. Government. 

HOMEWOOD, GEORGE M., HI, Richmond. 
Government/Economics. Sigma Nu; 
Queen's Guard; College Republicans; Al- 
pha Phi Omega, President. 

HOPKINS, DAVID EMERSON, Colonial 
Beach. Biology. Phi Kappa Tau, 
Rush Chairman; Biology Club. 

HOPKINS, DIANE ELIZABETH, Hamm, 
West Germany. Biology. Lambda Del- 
ta Alpha; Exeter Exchange Program; 
Intramurals. 

HORNSBY, J. W., Newport News. Govern- 
ment. Lambda Chi Alpha, Athletic 
Chairman, Intramurals; Young Democrats; 
Order of the White Jacket. 



Seniors/315 



»»»♦♦♦»»¥ 



HOUGH, CYNTHIA ANN, Fairfax. Econo- 
mics. 

HOUGH, JAN ELIZABETH, Cherry Hill, 
NJ. Accounting. OA; French House; 
Flat Hat, Production Staff, Advertising 
Manager; Alpha Lambda Delta; Pi 
Delta Phi. 

HOWELL, MARK HUNTER, Norfolk. 
Colonial American Studies. Dorm Council; 
WCWM: Society of Collegiate Jour- 
nalists; Project Plus, Forum Committee; 
Escort; Circle K. 

HUME, DONNA LYNN, Chesapeake. 
Accounting. Pi Beta Phi. 

HUNTER, ROBIN LISA, Surry. Biology/ 
Psychology. OA; Delta Delta Delta, 
Vice President; Cheerleading; Intramurals; 
Pi Kappa Alpha Sweetheart. 

HUNTSMAN, LAURIE ANN, Fredericks- 
burg. Philosophy/Psychology. Theater; 
Director's Workshop; OA; National 
Society for Collegiate Journalists; 
WCWM, Trainees Director, Public Affairs 
Director, Chief Announcer. 

HURT, REBECCA SUSAN, Richmond. 
Biology. WMCF; Project Plus; OA; RA. 

HUX, CHRISTOPHER W., Fairfax. Biology. 
Choir; Botetourt Chamber Singers; 
Theater; Sinfonicron; Backdrop Club; 
Orchesis; Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia; Phi Sig- 
ma; Mortar Board. 

HUX, MICHAEL MARCELLUS, Leesburg, 
FL. Biology. Navigators. 

HYDER, MARY COLIN, Johnson City, TN. 
Music. Canterbury Association, Presi- 
dent; Bruton Parish Choirs; Alpha Chi Ome- 
ga; Alpha Lambda Delta; Chorus. 

HYNDMAN, G. SPENCER, Falls Church. 
Biology. Rifle Team; Science Fiction 
Club; Intramurals. 

lANNI, DANIEL JOSEPH, Youngstown, NY. 
Business/Accounting. Intramurals; 
SA; RA; Theta Delta Chi; Marching, 
Concert Band. 

JACKSON, BRENT ALAN, Richmond. 
Government/Economics. Karate Team; 
BSO; RA; Intramurals. 

JACKSON, MELISSA ANN, Newport News. 
Business Administration. Kappa 
Alpha Theta, President, Rush Chairman; 
Alpha Lambda Delta; OA; Dorm 
Council; Pi Kappa Alpha Little Sister. 

JACKSON, WILLIAM DICKSON, West 
Point. Mathematics/Computer Science. 

JACOBS, SHARON LEE, Oakton. Biology/ 
Psychology. Dorm Council; RA; Mor- 
tar Board; Alpha Lambda Delta; Psychology 
Club; Phi Sigma; Alpha Chi Omega. 

JACOCKS, ANNE COVINGTON, Chesa- 
peake. Fine Arts. Colonial Echo. 

JENKINS, FRANCES LYNN, Chester. 
Psychology. RA; Dorm Council; Catholic 
Student Association; Alpha Chi Omega, 
Secretary; Psychology Club. 

JENKINS, MICHAEL RENFORTH, Atlanta, 
GA. Government. Flat Hat; Society 
of Collegiate Journalists; Rifle Team; Kappa 
Sigma. 

JENKINS, TAMMY ELIZABETH, Franklin. 
Business Administration/Management. 



JENNINGS, PATRICIA SUSAN, Rich- 
mond. Anthropology/History. Project Plus. 

JENNINGS, SHERYLL L., Charlottes- 
ville. Government. Delta Delta Delta; 
Sponsor Chairman; OA; Circle K; 
Dorm Council, President; Interhall; Alpha 
Lambda Delta; Kappa Delta Pi. 

JOHNSON, BRENT MITCHELL, Roanoke. 
Biology. Intramurals. 

JOHNSON, CAROL LIN, Harlingen, 

TX. English. Premiere Theatre; Backdrop 
Club; OA; Dorm Council, President; 
Alpha Chi Omega; WRA. 



» * ♦ ♦ ♦ 



»»¥»»»*»»*- 



BINN'S 




316/Seniors 



FASHION SHOP 



*********•»«****♦*** 



************** 



****** 



*********** 



***** 



******** 




Well, he finally asked 
you out. Now you have 
to impress him with your 
charm, personality, and ap- 
pearance. Charm and per- 
sonality depend on you, but 
appearance depends on Binn's 
Fashion Shop. 

Browsing through the store, 
you see endless possibilities: 
sportswear by Fearless, sweat- 
ers by Deans, and shoes by 
Pappagallo. Hours pass quick- 
ly as you try on blazers, 
sweaters, vests, dresses, 
shoes, and jewelry. Indeed, 
the longer you look, the 
harder the decision becomes. 
The brown sweater would look 
good with your beige pants. 
Then again, you could use a 
new skirt and this plaid one 
would look great with your 
new blouse. Better yet, you 
could buy the navy blue blazer 
to wear with your jeans. What 
a decision to make! After 
browsing around the store and 
finally making your purchases, 
you begin to realize one thing: 
Binn's has what you want. You 
may have the charm and per- 
sonality, but Binn's can add 
the extra polish to your ap- 
pearance and style. 

HOLLY POTTER checks out the fall 
fashions at Binn's. 
******************* 



JOHNSON. ERIC MARK, Williamsburg. 
Biology 

JOHNSON, HELEN GRIFFIN, Williams- 
burg. Fine Arts. Delta Delta Delta. 

JOHNSON, JAMES HENRY, III, Chesa- 
peake. Business Management. Dorm 
Council; Sigma Pi, House Manager, Pledge 
Class President; Intramurals; SAC; RA. 

JOHNSON, LINDA MARIE, Vienna. 

English. Colonial Echo: Dorm Council; Pi 
Kappa Alpha Little Sister. 



JOHNSON, TREAZURE BIRDIE, West 
Point. Government. Pi Beta Phi, 
Social Chairman; OA; Dorm Council; Cam- 
bridge Program; College Republicans; 
WATS; Intramurals. 

JONES, BRUCE LEROY, Springfield. 
Business Management. Band; Orchestra; 
Phi Mu Alpha, Secretary; Alpha 
Sigma Gamma; Intramurals. 

JONES, CECILIA CARR, Crozet. 
History. 

JONES. DAVID LEE, Mount Vernon. 

Chemistry. Sigma Chi, Treasurer; Chemis- 
try Club. 



Seniors/317 



»♦•»♦¥ 



»<^»»»*.»»» 



• »♦♦♦»* 



QUEUING UP 



JORGENSEN, JANET LYNN, Virginia 
Beach. Accounting. Alpha Lambda Delta; 
Kappa Alpha Theta, Recording Secre- 
tary; Cambridge Program; RA. 

JOYCE, ELLEN MARY, Harrisonburg. 
English. Chi Omega; Chorus; Evensong; 
Dorm Council, Secretary; Sigma Iota 
Chi; Circle K. 

JOYNER, SARAH CELESTE, Richmond. 
History. Chorus; Choir; Tennis; 
Alpha Lambda Delta; Pi Delta Phi; WMCF. 

JUDGE, JOSEPH M., Potomac, MD. Eng- 
lish. Circle K; Pi Kappa Alpha; Bote- 
tourt Bibliographical Society; Project Plus. 

JUNG, DOROTHY M., Randolph, WL 

Chemistry. Circle K; Chemistry Club, Presi- 
dent; Gamma Phi Beta, Panhellenic 
Representative; Swim Team; Cross Coun- 
try; Mortar Board; Dorm Council. 

KAMEOKA, JUDY YUKO, Oxon Hill, 
MD. English. Kappa Delta; Canterbury 
Association; Basketball. 

KANG, MYONG KYU, Falls Church. 
Economics/Math. 

KANIA, MICHAEL VINCENT, Spring- 
field. Accounting. Intramurals; Accounting 
Club. 



KASSABIAN, LYNNE A., Oakton. English. 
Backdrop Club. 

KAST, DAVID SHREVE, Brookfield Cen- 
ter, CT. Economics. Golf Team. 

KAVANAGH, VERONICA M., Richmond. 
English. Chi Omega, Courtesy, Social 
Co-Chairman; Flat Hat: OA; Senior Class 
Publicity. 

KEATING, NOREEN, Norwalk, CT. 
Biology. Phi Sigma; Alpha Lambda Delta; 
Circle K; International Circle. 



KEAYS, MARTHA SWEET, Gloucester. 

International Relations. 
KEEN, MARY ELIZABETH, Westlake, 

OH. Religion. OA; Colonial Echo, Classes 

Editor; Phi Mu, Librarian. 




KELLEY, KATHLEEN MARIE, Waynesboro. 

Physical Education. Swim Team; 

Field Hockey; Canoe Club; PE Majors Club, 

Secretary. 
KELLY, ALISON YVONNE, Falls Church. 

Government. Chi Omega; Orchesis; 

Colonial Echo: Dorm Council; Junior 

Year Abroad. 



KELLY, JOY ELLEN, Rumson, NJ. Phy- 
sical Education. WMCF; FCA; Cross 
Country, Captain; Track. Captain. 

KENNEDY, JOHN FRANCIS, Upper 
Darby, PA. Government. RA; Pi Sigma 
Alpha; Young Democrats, Vice President; 
Intramurals. 




Registration, dinner at 
the caf, and the first 
Pub night of the year all had 
one thing in common: lines. 
From freshman registration to 
senior graduation, standing in 
line was a part of W&M life. 
Everyone complained about 
the senselessness and disor- 
ganization of lines, and about 
the time wasted standing in 
line. Sometimes those com- 
plaints were heard and an 
attempt was made to correct 
the situation. But for the 
most part, everyone had to 
endure the seemingly endless 
queuing up! W&M students, 
scholars that they are, made 
the best of it. A long string 
of people, each with book in 
hand, diligently studying, 
was a common scene around 
campus. So if no final solu- 
tion was found, at least the 
students learned to adapt to 
their 'linear environment.' 

»»¥♦»»♦»»»*♦♦♦¥»♦»' 



318/Seniors 



***** 



***** 



********* 




KENNEDY, JOHN MARTIN, Falmouth. 
Interdisciplinary. Swim Team. 

KERNS, ELIZABETH A., Arlington, 
Interdisciplinary. Debate; Project Plus. 

KEROACK, ROBERT HENRY, Norwich, CT. 
Geology. Track; Colonial Echo. Photo- 
grapher; Flat Hat, Photographer; 
Track Team, Captain. 

KnSK, LINDA MAE, Alexandria. Fine 
Arts. OA; SA Senator; Gymnastics; Lu- 
theran Student Association; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma, Historian. 



KINDE, JEANNETTE GAYLE, Williams- 
burg. History. 

KING, DAVID SCOTT, Virginia Beach. 
Business Management. Escort; Queen's 
Guard; Dorm Council; HSU; Young 
Democrats. 

KING, SHARON LYNNE, Vienna. Geo- 
logy. Chorus; Choir; Phi Mu; Sigma Gamma 
Epsilon. 

KINGSLEY, NEIL ROBERT, New Canaan, 
CT. History. Phi Eta Sigma, Trea- 
surer; Phi Alpha Theta; Phi Kappa Tau; 
ROTC; Queen's Guard; Scabbard and 
Blade. 

KINNEY, HARRY ADRIAN, JR., Spring- 
field. Economics, RA; Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 
Corresponding Secretary; WCWM; 
VAPIRG; Dorm Council; Senior Class 
Publicity Committee. 

KIRK, DAVID WOODSON, Oklahoma City, 
OK. Philosophy/History. Philosophy 
Club; History Club. 

KIRN, GERALDINE MARIE, Chevy 
Chase, MD. Psychology. Psychology Club; 
Project Plus; SAC. 

KITCHEN, JOHN H., New Castle, PA. 
Economics/History. Pi Kappa Alpha. 



KLEIN, GARRY WADE, Fairfax. Govern- 
ment/Philosophy. Intramurals; Karate 
Club; Lacrosse; OA. 



KNAPP, FREDERICK A., New Canaan, 
CT. Biology. Varsity Lacrosse, Captain; 
Lambda Chi Alpha, Projects Chair- 
man; RA; Intramurals; Navigators. 



KNIGHT, GARY ELIZABETH, Warsaw. 
Biology. Basketball; College Republi- 
cans; Biology Club; Intramurals. 



«*«««*V41^4^V«««*V**«V«VV«««y,«« 



Seniors/319 



******* 



****** 



* * * * * 



************************* 



************. 



KNOLLMANN, THOMAS C. Williamsburg. 
Business Administration. Pi Kappa 
Alpha; Rubgy. 

KOLOSKI, PETER MAXIMILIAN, Pough- 
keepsie, NY. Biology. Tennis; WMCF; 
Navigators. 

KOVAL, DOUGLAS CHARLES, Richard- 
son, TX. Accounting. Football; Kappa Al- 
pha, House Manager, Vice President. 

KRACHE, ELIZABETH M., Piscataway, 
NJ., English. Kappa Alpha Theta, 
Service Chairman; Italian House, Secre- 
tary; OA; RA; Band. 

KRAMER, WALTER FREDERICK, Garden 
City, NY. Geology. Sigma Chi; Honor 
Council; IFC, Treasurer; OA; Assistant 
Orientation Director; FHC; Circle 
K; Catholic Student Association; Intra- 
murals. 

KRANTZ, DAVID EUGENE, Easton, 
MD. Biology. Kappa Alpha; Canoe Team; 
Intramurals. 

KRAUSE, KAREN MARIE, Arlington. 
Elementary Education. Wesley Foundation; 
WMCF; WATS; Project Plus. 

KRCELIC, TAMMY M., Williams- 
burg. Chemistry. Chemistry Club; Young 
Democrats. 




******** 



***** ********************************** ************** 

Nestled in the block domin- 
ated by sorority court on 
Richmond Road, was a small brick 
building that housed the Center 
for Psychological Services. The 
Center was formally organized in 
1970 when Dr. Jay Chambers 
became its first director. Up 
until that time, students desir- 
ing help were forced to seek out 
members of the psychology depart- 
ment for assistance. When the 
center first opened it was, in 
fact, staffed by these faculty 
members, but has since then 
acquired its own staff of 
professionals. 

According to Dr. Cardi, the 
Center has been kept very busy, 
with peak times corresponding to 
mid-terms and finals. Students 
desiring help are seen as soon 
as possible, which is usually 
within a week. 

In general, says Dr. Cardi, 
students are bothered by two 
basic problems: anxiety about 
grades, and problems involving 
interpersonal relationships with 
parents, friends, and roommates. 

As the Center is funded by the 
College and Student Health fees, 
visits are free and completely 
self-determined as to the number 
of subsequent sessions and to 
confidentiality. 

*******************l^:l^********l^.l^**l^*****l^*I^**l^*****■****■********* 




320/Seniors 



PSYCH SERVICES 



******************* 





KUC, DAVID A.. Manassas. English/ 
History. 

KUNTZ. PATRICIA ANN, Wall, NJ. 
Mathematics/Psychology. Colonial Echo: 
Alpha Lambda Delta, Secretary; 
Circle K. Secretary. 

LACY, ROBERT K.', Springfield. Govern- 
ment. Pi Lambda Phi, Pledge Marshal; 
SA, Vice-President for Student Ser- 
vices, Senator; Cambridge Program. 

LACY, TAMARA DARLENE, Lynchburg. 
Physical Education. PE Majors Club. 
Volleyball; Karate Club. 



LAHS, LAURA ANN, Mendham, NJ. 
English/History. Publications Council; 
Catholic Student Association; Wil- 
liam and Man' News; Washington Program. 

LAJOIE, JOHN THOMAS, Sarasota, FL. 
Accounting. Track; Accounting Club. 

LAKIN, MICHAEL ALAN, McLean. 
Biology. Theta Delta Chi; Parachute Club. 

LAM, DEBORAH E., Charlottesville. 
Biology. Young Life Leadership; Phi Mu; 
WMCF; Basketball. 



LAM, PERRY PING SON, Hampton. 
Business Management. Karate Club; In- 
ternational Circle; Theta Delta Chi, 
Assistant Social Chairman, President; Dorm 
Council; RA; OA. 

LAMBARDO, DONNA LYNN, Livingston, 
NJ. Biology/Psychology. Phi Mu, 
Public Relations; RA; Phi Sigma. 

LAMBERT, BEATRICE SCOTT, Smith- 
field, NC. Anthropology/History. 

LAMOND, HEATHER JEAN, Albany, NY. 
Anthropology. Circle K; Lutheran 
Student Association. 

LAMPERT, PATRICU LEIGH, Richmond. 
Elementary Education. Basketball; 
Intramurals. 

LANGFORD, DAVID ALLEN, Roswell, 
GA. Biology/Psychology. Circle K; Phi Eta 
Sigma; Phi Sigma; Psychology Club; 
Pi Kappa Alpha; Intramurals; French 
House; United Virginia Skiers' Association. 

LARK, JOSEPH ANDREW, Hackensack, 
NJ. Government/History. College 
Republicans, President; Pi Sigma Alpha, 
Treasurer; Mortar Board; Escort; Pro- 
ject Plus; Cambridge Program. 

LARSON, DARYL ANNE, Brighton, MI. 
Business Management. 

LARSON, MELISSA A., Davenport, L\. 

Elementary Education. Dorm Council, 

President; Mermettes, Co-Director; 

Kappa Delta Pi; Pi Beta Phi, 

Social Vice President, Pledge Trainer. 
LAUCK, ELISE SUSANNE, McLean. 

Biology/Spanish. Mermettes; 

Spanish House. 
LAUER, KURT ALAN, Lynchburg. 

Government. 
LAWLOR, KATHLEEN ANN, Paoli, PA. 

Business Administration. Dorm Council, 

Vice-President; Swim Team; 

Delta Delta Delta, Rush Chairman. 

LAYNE, CAROLYN DORIS, Portsmouth. 

Math. Gamma Phi Beta, Corresponding 

Secretary; Evensong; Circle K. 
LAYNE, LINDA CAROL, Salem. 

Accounting. Delta Delta Delta. 
LEAF, MARY BETH, Albuquerque, NM, 

Geology. Project Plus; RA; Environment 

Committee. 
LECLERC, MARTIN GERARD, Manassas. 

HistoH'. WCWM; WATS; SA, 

Senator; Theta Delta Chi. 



Seniors/321 



'^*'^'^'^l^'^l^l^l^l^'^■l^'^'^'^ 



»*»♦♦»••♦#♦**♦♦*♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦*♦♦ 



LEDWITH, JAMES JOSEPH, JR., Green- 
wich, CT. Chemistry. Theta Delta 
Chi, Vice-President; Chemistry Club, 
Treasurer; Phi Sigma; Band. 

LEINBERRY, GAYLE A., Framingham, 
MA. Biology. Gamma Phi Beta, 
Social Chairman; Biology Club. 

LEISCH, JUANITA MARY, Berryville. 
American Material Culture. Day Student 
Council, Chairman; Young Demo- 
crats, President; SAC. 

LEONE, LISA H., Rumson, NJ. Business 
Management. 



LEWIS, JANICE DIANE, Alexandria. 
Government/Economics. Pi Sigma Alpha. 

LEWIS, MARGARET, Midlothian. Econo- 
mics. Dorm Council; Interhall, Trea- 
surer; Phi Mu, Treasurer; Senior Class 
SecretaryATreasurer. 

LIMERICK, LESTER L., JR., Fredericks- 
burg. Business Management. Sigma 
Chi; Varsity Cheerleading, Co-Captain. 

LIN, KATHRYN RITA, Norfolk. Biology/ 
Psychology. Phi Sigma, President; 
Circle K; Alpha Lambda Delta. 



LINDSAY, PAULA GLADYS, Lexington. 

Elementary Education. Intramurals. 
LINT, CATHERINE ANNE, Alexandria. 

American Studies. Flat Hat, Arts 

Editor, Reporter; Society of Collegiate 

Journalists. 
LITTLEJOHN, MARGARET LINDSAY, 

McLean. Business Management. 

Lacrosse; Gamma Phi Beta, President; 

Intramurals. 
LONGERBEAM, GENEVIEVE 

ELIZABETH, Hopewell. History/Studio 

Art. 



LORIMER, ELIZABETH CHRISTINA, 

Richmond. Biology. Women's Varsity Track. 
LORIX, KELLEY ROBERT, Minneapolis, 

MN. Government. Pi Kappa Alpha; 

Pi Sigma Alpha; College Democrats. 
LOWREY, HAYNIE LEE, Atlanta, GA. 

History. 
LOZIER, DAVID JAMES, Petersburg. 

Government/Psychology. ROTC; 

Day Student Caucus; College Republicans. 



LUPOLD, RAY PALMER, m, Christians- 
burg. Government/Religion. Theta 
Delta Chi, Rush Chairman, Pledge Trainer; 
Intramurals; Government Club. 

LYON, ROBERT LESLIE, Richmond. 
Business Management. 

MACAULEY, MOLLY KENNA, Falls 
Church. Economics. Asia House; Washing- 
ton Program; Interhall; Women's 
Rugby Club; Colonial Echo; Mortar Board; 
Society of Collegiate Journalists. 

MACEDO, STEPHEN JOSEPH, New 
Bedford, MA. Economics. Pi Kappa Alpha; 
College Republicans; Circle K; Omi- 
cron Delta Epsilon; Government Honor 
Society. 

MAC HATTON, DOUGLAS A., South Bend 
IN. Economics, Pi Kappa Alpha; Intra- 
murals; Italian House; Economics Club. 

MAC INTOSH, ELIZABETH BONNIE, 
West Springfield, MA. Physics. Lu- 
theran Student Association, Secretary; 
Band; Orientation Assistant Director; 
Circle K. 

MACKAY, LAN ALLISTER, Virginia 
Beach. Accounting. Dorm Council; Pi 
Kappa Alpha. 

MACKO, VALERIE JEAN, Lynchburg. 
Biology. Phi Mu; YAF; Phi Sigma; 
Intramurals; Karate Club. 









322/Seniors 



PIN BALL WIZARD 



********************* 




MAC NEIL, BRUCE REED, Newport 
News. Government. Sinfonicron, Young 
Democrats. 

MAHAFFEY, JULIA LYNN, Williamsburg. 
Elementary Education. Pi Beta Phi, 
House President; Circle K; Student Educa- 
tion Association. 

MAKOWSKI, ANN, Virginia Beach. Bio- 
logical Anthropology. French House; 
Phi Mu, Social Services Chairman. 

MALLOY, SUSAN EILEEN, Havertown, 
PA. Accounting. SA, Treasurer; Bas- 
ketball; Lacrosse. 



MALONEY, JEANNE MARIE, Bartlesville, 

OK. Economics. Italian House, Treasurer. 
MANETTI, HOWARD ENRICO, McLean. 

Economics. Sigma Chi. 
MANGELSDORF, LOUISE ANN, Oakmont, 

PA. Biology. WMCF, Executive Council. 
MANIX, SUSAN PATRICL\, Stamford, 

CT. Economics/Government. RA; Panhel; 

Omicron Delta Kappa; Mortar Board; 

Student Liaison to Board of Visitors; Kappa 

Kappa Gamma. 



****************************************«***********************:***< 




In seeking a liberal arts 
education here at W&M, 
students were continually urged 
to pursue their interests, par- 
ticipate in a variety of activ- 
ities, and generally become 
"well-rounded" individuals. 
One activity that a growing 
number of students discovered 
in fulfilling this requirement 
lay right in their own dorms: 
pinball. 

"Pinball mania" was a pre- 
valent aspect of lounge life. 



One student conducted a study on 
the habits and lifestyles of 
pinball participants. As faces 
at the machine became increasingly 
familiar to the researcher, he 
cited an interesting fact: 
the majority of these players 
were not just haphazardly 
interested passers-by, but 
enthusiastic regulars. "When I 
ask for two dollars in change at 
the Campus Center, I think of it 
as the number of pinball games 
it will provide," declared one 



JOHN BERRY OBSERVES the pinball 
mania possessing Stewart Manning. 

maniac to the tune of jingling 
coins in his pocket. 

The machines most frequently 
in action seemed to be located 
in male dorms. (Perhaps a 
carry-over from their days of 
tough little gangs hanging out 
at the bowling alleys or beach 
strip game rooms?) The data 
pointed to Dupont, JBT, and 
Old Dominion as the highest 
(continued on next page) 



»♦»»♦♦♦ 



»♦»♦»♦♦♦»* 



•»•»♦» 



» ♦ ♦ ♦ 



Seniors/323 



► ♦♦»»»*»»»»♦♦♦»»»»»♦♦» 



PINBALL WIZARD 



MARGARD, WERNER LEROY, HI, Worth- 
ington, OH. Psychology. Rugby Club; 
Premier Theater; College Civitans; 
Escort; Bacon Street; Hotline. 

MARSHALL, DAVID JARRELL, Appo- 
mattox. Business Management. Phi Eta 
Sigma; Beta Gamma Sigma. 

MARTIELLL SUSAN FLAIR, Ellicott 
City, MD. English. Circle K; Chi Omega; 
William and Mary Review. 

MARTIN, GARY ROBERT, Norfolk. 
Computer Science. ACM, President. 



MARTIN, GEORGE RICHARD, Berkeley 
Heights, NJ. Government/History. 

MARTIN, HAROLD G., JR., Bassett. 
English/Economics. Pi Kappa Alpha, 
Secretary; Intramurals; Dorm Council. 

MARTORANA, JEFFREY THOMAS, Alex- 
andria. Biology. Intramurals. 

MASON, CHRISTINA MARIE, Oneonta, 
NY. History. Orchesis, Secretary; 
Phi Alpha Theta. 




****************** 




♦ ♦»»»♦»»♦»♦»»♦ 



»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



» ♦ ♦ ♦ » 



******************** 

scorers in terms of total play- 
ing time. However, while mak- 
ing his way into coed Bryan, 
the researcher spied a female 
participant anxiously leaning 
over her machine, whitened 
knuckled gripping the knobs, 
her facial expressions light- 
ing up and dimming in syn- 
chronization with the pinball 
machine's board. When the 
game reached its finale, he 
scurried over to capture some 
reaction before the next 
quarter could be deposited. 
Looking anxiously around to 
be sure no by-standers were 
present, she finally gained 
her composure and agreed to 
relate her saga (but only 
under condition of remaining 
anonymous): "Well, there I 
was sitting in the lounge, 
nothing exciting on T.V., 
with this quarter just burn- 
ing a hole in my pocket. 
I'd already eaten four candy 
bars, drank two cokes, but 
couldn't bring myself to make 
my entrance back into the 
Law Library just yet. What 
else was there to do but test 
my skills at pinball? I 
deposited my coin, the bells 
started ringing, balls whirl- 
ing and pinging — now I'm 
hooked!" 



324/Seniors 



(CONTINUED) 



****** 



***** 



****** 




MASSEY, ELIZABETH RIVES, Norfolk. 

German/English, Chi Omega. 
MASSEY. HUGH DAVIS, Richmond. 

ReUgion. 
MASTROBATTISTA, MARY PATRICIA, 

Williamsburg. Spanish. 
MATHIS, KEITH E., Arlington. Economics. 

Dorm Council. 



MATSON, BRUCE H., North Branford, 
CT. American Studies. SA, Senate; BSA; 
Sigma Chi, Historian; Canoe Club, 
President. 

MATTHEWS, MARY ALICE, Petersburg. 
Business Management. Chi Omega; 
Circle K. 

MATTHEWS, TERESA LYNN, Arlington 
Government/History. WCWM; Sinfo- 
nicron. Publicity; French House; WMCF; 
HSO; Government Club. 

MAYBERRY, THOMAS S., Williamsburg. 
Government/Economics. Varsity Fenc- 
ing, Co-Captain; ROTC; Debate; Dorm 
Council; OA; Pi Kappa Alpha; Intramurals. 

MC CALEB, MARY ELIZABETH, Selma. 

Elementary Education. Alpha Chi Omega. 
MC CANDLESS, SHERRI DAWN, Broomall, 

PA. Government/Spanish. Chorus; 

Choir; Botetourt Chamber Singers; Honor 

Council, Vice-Chairperson; Chi Omega; 

Flat Hat. 
MC CARTHY, .JANET ELAINE, Vienna. 

English/Spanish. Writers' Club; Tutoring. 
MC CULLA, JOHN KENNEDY, McLean. 

Business Management. Sigma Pi, 

Herald, Vice-President; Intramurals; 

Football; Rugby Club, Captain. 



MC CUTCHEON, ROBIN, Richmond. 

Psychology. Kappa Delta, Parliamentarian. 
MC ELROY, DEBRA LYNN, Alexandria. 

Psychology. 
MC ELYEA, WILLIAM D., Baltimore, MD. 

Urban Affairs. RA; Backdrop Club; 

Project Plus; Omicron Delta Kappa. 
MC FADEN, LESLIE DIANE, Lynchburg. 

History/Anthropology. HSO; Anthropology 

Club. 



MC GINTY, CECILM ANN, Alexandria. 
Government/History. Kappa Delta; 
Dorm Council; Catholic Student Asso- 
ciation. 

MC GOLRICK, ELIZABETH ANNE, 
Manassas. Accounting. Pi Beta Phi, Philan- 
thropies Chairman; OA; Dorm Council. 

MC LEOD, PAUL JOSEPH, Holmdel, NJ. 
Geology/Anthropology. Sigma Gam- 
ma Epsilon, WCWM. 

MC MAHON, THERESA LYNN, Glen 
Allen. Theatre/Speech. Chorus; Choir; Delta 
Omicron, President: Sinfonicron, 
Director; Backdrop Club, Director; Di- 
rector's Workshop. 

MC MATH, CHARLES FRANCIS, Annan- 
dale. Chemistry/Computer Science. 
Band; Chamber Ensemble: Circle K; 
WMCF; Intramurals. 

MC MATH, ELIZABETH CLARKE, Onley. 
Government. College Republicans; 
Government Club, Vice President; Pi Beta 
Phi, Recording Secretary. 

MC NALL, JEAN CARYL, Palo Alto, CA. 
Business Management. 

MC QUARRY, FRANK ARTHUR, Lynch- 
burg. Economics/Religion. Choir; In- 
tramurals; Economics Club. 



Seniors/325 



AIDING THE AILING 



***********! 



MEADE, ELIZABETH GRANT, Norfolk. 
Psycholog>-. Director's Workshop; 
Phi Mu, Rush Counselor. 

MEARS, CHRISTOPHER LYNN, Rich- 
mond. Physics/Computer Science. Physics 
Electronics Technician; Intramurals; 
Dorm Council. 

MELDRLTM, HEATHER THANE, Malvern, 
PA. Economics. Omicron Delta Epsi- 
lon; Publications Council; SA Representa- 
tive; Lacrosse; Hockev. 

MENDEZ, CHARLES PAUL, Washington, 
DC. Economics. Fencing; Omicron 
Delta Epsilon. 

MEUSCHKE, MARK WILLIAM, Roanoke. 
German. Band; Orchestra; German 
House, President; Queen's Guard; ROTO; 
Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Vice Presi- 
dent. Warden. 

MIANTE, CHERYL ANN, Newport News. 
Accounting. Accounting Club. Alpha 
Sigma Gamma. 

MILLER. ALTLHVIN CHERYL, Manassas. 
Religion. Dorm Council; Interhall; 
Orientation Assistant Director; Chi Omega, 
Panhel Representative, President; 
BSA, Secretary. 

MILLER, KATHLEEN ANNE, AUentown, 
PA. Music Education. Alpha Lambda 
Delta; Chorus; Choir; Delta Omi- 
cron; Catholic Student Association, 
President. 

MILLER, LINDA LEE, Skaneateles, NY. 
History. Kappa Delta, Historian; 
Dorm Council; Women's Forum; Circle K. 

MILLER, SHARON ANNETTE, Roanoke. 
Elemental' Education. Circle K; WMCF. 

MIMS, WTLLIAM C, Harrisonburg. His- 
tory. Dorm Council. President; Inter- 
hall; Lacrosse; Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi Eta 
Sigma; Phi Alpha Theta; Chairman, 
Academic Affairs; Washington Program; 
Cambridge Program; President's Aide; 
SA, President. 

MINEHART, PETER JAMES, Alexandria. 
Mathematics. Band; Flat Hat; Wil- 
liam and Mary Review. 

MINETREE, LARAINE KAY, Petersburg. 
Psychology. Pi Beta Phi, Membership 
Chairman; Women's Tennis Team; Senior 
Class Organizational Committee. 

MINJACK, GREGORY ANSON, Alexandria. 
Government. Sigma Chi; Varsity Golf. 

MODR, FRANCES A., West Point. 
Elementar%- Education. 

MOLL, AMY ELIZABETH, Southport, 
CT. Economics. Varsity Tennis, Co- 
Captain; Chi Omega; Panhellenic Council; 
Intramurals; WRA Representative; 
Dorm Council; Alpha Lambda Delta; 
Omicron Delta Epsilon; Sigma Delta Pi. 

MONIOLT)IS, MARIA ELENA, Buenos 

Aries, Argentina. Psychology. Chi Omega; 

International Circle; Collegiate Civi- 

tans; Psychology Club. 
MOOMAW, KATHLEEN -JO, Staunton. 

Accounting. Flat Hat. 
MOORE. BARBARA MARIE. Fairfield. CT. 

Accounting. Kappa Kappa Gamma, 

Membership Chairman; Accounting Club. 
MOORE, BETSY .JOAN. Bon Air. 

French/English. Gymnastics; Delta Delta 

Delta, Publicity Chairman. 

MOORE, DONA LEE. Silver Spring, MD. 
Spanish/Anthropology. Chorus; Choir; 
Spanish House. 

MOORE. ROBERT PATRICK. JR.. Rich- 
mond. Business Administration/ 
Management. Sigma Chi, Historian. 

MORGAN, DA\TD G.. Midlothian. Eng- 
lish. Pi Kappa Alpha, House Manager, 
Steward. 

MORGAN, EILEEN MARIE, Cheny Hill, 
NJ. Government. Kappa Delta; 
Government. Club; Young Democrats; 
Intramurals. 




326/Seniors 



******** 



******* 



****** 




MORGAN. TERRELL ALAN, Hampton. 
Linguistics. Phi Eta Sigma; Spanish 
House; BSU Handbell Choir, Director; Ju- 
nior Year Abroad. 

MORRIS. CHERYL ANNE, Midlothian. 
Accounting. Chorus, President; Kap- 
pa Delta, Chapter Education Chairman; 
Accounting Club; Alpha Sigma Gamma. 

MORRIS, CRAIG KENNETH, Camp 
Hill, PA. English. Sigma Chi; Intramurals; 
OA. 

MORRISON, PETER ALWARD, Due West, 
SC. Historv. 



******* 



********************************************** 



****** 




Where did the William and 
Mary student turn to seek 
relief from a fall down a flight 
of stairs or a case of "over- 
doing it" that resulted in mono? 
He probably headed (or hobbled) 
toward Gooch Drive to the Stu- 
dent Health Service Center, where 
a staff consisting of four doc- 
tors, seven nurses, a full-time 
pharmacist and lab technician 
were well-equipped to aid stu- 
dents in need of medical atten- 
tion. The modern, 16-bed "mini 
hospital" facility offered 24- 



hour quaUty medical care that 
was readily available at a 
contained cost to all eligible 
students. 

The Center provided other 
services to the students 
as well. Dr. Richard 
Cilley, director of the Student 
Health Service, and the other 
physicians gave lectures in 
residence halls on self-health 
care and nutrition, and con- 
ducted seminars dealing with 
human sexuality, birth control, 
and how to cope with psycholog- 



KAREN MULVANEY recuperates in the 
comforting atmosphere of the infirmary. 

ical stress and anxiety. The 
Student Health Pharmacy dispensed 
prescription drugs to patients 
at a nominal cost, and low-cost 
supplementary insurance policy 
was also made available to all 
eligible students. Without 
Mom and Dad around, the next 
best place to go with that 
sore throat or terrible cold 
was the Student Health Service 
Center. 



« » » » * 



♦ ♦ ♦ » • 



»♦»»»»»»♦»»»♦♦»»♦»»•»♦♦»»¥»♦•» 




MORROW, RObERT JEFFREY, Falls 
Church. G. 3nt. 

MORSE, FREDERICK ANDERSON, Rich- 
mond. Business Management. Pi Kappa 
Alpha, President; Colonial Echo, Busi- 
ness Manager, Advertisement Editor; 
President's Aide; Society for Collegiate 
Journalists; Disciplinary Commit- 
tee; Italian House. 

MORTON, JAMES BRADLEY, Newport 
News. Theatre/Speech. WCWM; 
William and Mary Theatre; Premiere 
Theatre; Director's Workshop; Backdrop 
Club. 

MOSELEY, ARTHUR M., JR., Richmond. 
Economics. SAC Representative; 
BSA; Theta Delta Chi, Steward; Intra- 
murals. 



Seniors/327 



»♦♦♦*»»» 



»♦♦♦♦»■»♦♦¥♦» 



l^l^l^l^.l^l^.•^l^'^ 



A MYRIAD 



MOTSKO, WILLIAM ANDRES, Randalls- 
town, MD. Biology. Pi Lambda 
Phi, President. Rush Chairman, Athletic 
Chairman; Intramurals; Lacrosse, 
Captain. 

MOTT, ELENA MEDORA, Falls Church. 
Sociology. Kappa Delta; College 
Bowling League; Christian Science 
Organization 

MOURING, BRADFORD KEITH, Hampton. 
Biology /Psychology. 

MUENCHOW, RICHARD W., Silver Spring, 
MD. German. WMCF; Wesley Founda- 
tion; German House; Delta Phi Alpha; 
Phi Eta Sigma. 



MULVANY, KAREN, Sausalito, CA. Physics/ 
Psychology. 

MURPHY, DIANNE R., Ringwood, NJ. 
Business Management. Pi Beta Phi, Trea- 
surer; OA; Intramurals. 

MURPHY, MICHAEL J., Vienna. Computer 
Science. Choir; Botetourt Chamber 
Singers; Theta Delta Chi. 

MURPHY, SEAN CHRISTOPHER, Martins- 
ville. Geology. 



MURRELL, DENISE PEETE, Virginia 
Beach. Sociology/Psychology. BSO; Ebony 
Expressions; Delta Sigma Theta, 
Sergeant of Arms; Psychology Club. 

MUSCALUS, ROBERT STEWART, Frack- 
ville, PA, Economics. Football; FCA; 
Kappa Sigma; Intramurals; Omicron 
Delta Epsilon. 

MUTTER, MARY GLENN, Roanoke. 

Elementary Education/Psychology. Chorus; 
Choir; Phi Mu, Vice President, Mem- 
bership Chairman; Alpha Lambda Delta; Pi 
Kappa Alpha Little Sister; Kappa Delta 
Pi, President. 

MYRICK, TIMOTHY GLENN, Colonial 
Heights. Biology. 



NAGAI, YOSHINORI, Osaka, Japan. 
Comparative International Relations. 

NAMMACK, MARTA FRIMANN, Alex- 
andria. Biology. Diving Team; Biology Club; 
Intramurals; Scuba Club. 

NANCE, JOY THORBJORNSEN, Chesa- 
peake. Elementary Education. Wesley 
Foundation. 

NELSON, LORI ANN, Bound Brook, NJ. 
Biology /Religion/Psychology. 



NELSON, MARGARET ANGELA, Lynch- 
burg. Economics/History. President's 
Aide; Honor Council; SA Senator; Delta 
Delta Delta, Chaplain; Project Plus; 
Cambridge Program; OA; Chorus; Senior 
Class President. 

NEWCOMB, DEBORAH LUDWELL, Dahl- 
gren. Mathematics. Circle K; Dorm Council. 

NEWELL, WILLIAM TALMAN, HI, Jackson, 
MS. Economics Outing Club; Economics 
Club; Russian Club; Intramurals; Russian 
House, Treasurer, Vice President; 
Band, Concert, Marching; RA; Omicron 
Delta Epsilon. 

NEWHOUSE, SUSAN CAROL, Alexandria. 
Biology. 



NGUYEN, LUAN HUY, Virginia Beach, 
Business Administration. International Cir- 
cle; French House. 

NICHOLS, REBECCA LYNN, Roanoke. 
Business Administration/Management . 

NICHOLS, STEPHEN A., Annandale. 
Chemistry. BSU, President, Family Group 

NIELSEN, NANCY T., Potomac, MD. 
Interdisciplinary. 




.328/Seniors 



OF SERVICES 



* * * * 



*[**************«*******< 




NORTON, MICHAEL JOHN. Sandston. 
English/Philosophy. Catholic Student 
Association, Vice President: Social 
Concerns Committee; CaMU; Circle K; OA, 

NUTTALL, ELIZABETH TUCKER, Ports- 
mouth. Elementary Education. Kappa 
Delta Pi. Secretary; OA. 

OAKLEY. ELIZABETH LOUISE, Winnetka, 
IL. French. Pi Beta Phi, Music Chair- 
man; Intramurals; Chorus. 

O'BOYLE, PATRICIA S., Alexandria. 

Biology. OA; RA; Dorm Council, Treasurer. 



**************************** 



****** 



****** 



****** 



***** 




For the William 
and Mary student, 
life was a little easier with 
the Campus Center near at 
hand. When he walked in its 
large double doors, a number 
of services were immediately 
at hand. Right inside the 
door, bulletin boards provided 
space for ride notices, campus 
announcements, and "For Sale" 
signs. In the lobby, an 
information desk sold candy 
and magazines, cashed checks, 
and distributed game room 



equipment. Also located on the 
first floor was the Wigwam, a 
dining facility which provided 
anything from light snacks to 
big meals for hungry students. 
Meal tickets offered admittance 
to breakfast and, for the first 
year, dinner. 

That was only the beginning 
of what the Campus Center had 
to offer. For the student 
with spare time, there were 
television, reading, and game 
rooms. In the basement, dark- 
rooms and a craft shop provided 



a creative outlet for students. 
Lounges offered day students a 
place to relax and study, and 
conference rooms provided 
campus clubs and organizations 
a convenient place to meet. 
Finally, the Campus Center housed 
publications and student 
government offices. 

The diverse accommodations 
found within the Campus Center 
succeeded in fulfilling a 
wide range of student needs. 

THE CAMPUS CENTER provides many 
services. 



♦ »»♦¥*»♦ 



#««¥¥* 



• ♦ • » » 




O'CONNOR, ANNETTE JANE, Fredericks- 
burg. Business Management. OA; Circle K. 

O'CONNOR, JONATHAN STORY, Ports- 
mouth. Physics/Chemistry. .Society 
of Physics Students, Vice President; Chem- 
istry Lab Assistant. 

O'DONOGHUE, PATRICIA JEAN, Balti- 
more, MD. Psycho-biology. Circle K; Bacon 
Street; Biology Club. 

ODOR, KEVIN"C., Rossville, IL. History/ 
Religion. FCA, President; Lambda Chi 
Alpha; Football; FHC; President's 
Aide; Intramurals. 



Seniors/329 



******** 



********* 



******** 



****** 



******* 



******* *** 



***************** 



***** 



****** 




The town of Williamsburg 
includes a unique estab- 
lishment — The Williamsburg 
Pottery Factory. Here, the 
student can select from a 
wide range of dishes, and 
home furnishings at unbeliev- 
ably low prices. 

The size of the Pottery and 
its low prices are the most 
striking features. Row upon 
endless row of merchandise 
tempts the student as he wan- 
ders down the aisles and 
through the buildings. A 
huge selection of birthday, 
Christmas, and wedding gifts 
awaits those who enter its 
buildings. And if the stu- 
dent desires something for his 
own dorm room or apartment, 
he can choose from an endless 
supply of plants, glasses, 
dishes, lamps, pictures, and 
home furnishings — all at 
incredibly low prices. 

The next time you have a 
free afternoon, visit the 
Williamsburg Pottery Factory. 
With its wide variety and low 
prices, it will be well worth 
the time. 

THE ENDLESS SELECTION OF MER- 
CHANDISE at the Pottery Factory keeps 
Paul McLeod shopping for hours. 



ititli****.**.********* 

O'HARA, JANE ALICE, Falls Church. 
English. Circle K. 

GHARA, NICHOLAS VINCENT, JR., Vir- 
ginia Beach. Physical Education. PE 
Majors Club; Tennis; Intramurals. 

OLSEN, KRISTIN JUST, Chester, NJ. Eng- 
lish. WRA, Vice President; Chi Omega, 
Vice President; William and Man' Reuiew 
Fiction Review Board, Editorial Assis- 
tant; Senior Class Newsletter, Chairman. 

OLSON, GRANT C, McLean. International 
Relations. Order of the White Jacket; 
Pi Lambda Phi; VAPIRG, Trea- 
surer; Intramurals. 



ONDARZA, ROSEANNE, Hampton. 
Accounting. Phi Mu, Historian; ROTC; 
Queen's Guard; Intramurals; Young Demo- 
crats; Accounting Club. 

PACE, GARY JAMES, Silver Spring, MD. 
Biology/Psvchologv, Pi Kappa Alpha. 

PALANCA, TERILYN, Morristown, NJ. 
Music/Classical Studies. Chorus; Delta 
Omicron, Warden, Historian; Clas- 
sics Club; Evensong; Sinfonicron; Director's 
Workshop. 

PARKER, DENNIS WINSTON, Bristol. 
Biology. Dorm Council; Intramurals. 



*********** 



******** 



If******** 




330/Seniors 



POTTERY FACTORY 



♦♦»♦♦♦♦»♦ 



♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ » 




PARRISH, NANCY LOUISE, Norfolk. 
Business Administration/Manaeement. 
Pi Beta Phi. 

PARSONS, TWYLA LYNN, Richmond. Bio- 
logy. Chi Omega, Assistant Pledge 
Trainer; College Republicans; Honor 
Council. 

PASCHAL, DENISE LEE, Asheboro, NO. 
Biology. Phi Sigma; Project Plus. 

PASCHALL, J. ALAN, Hanover. Physics. 
Lambda Chi Alpha; RA. 



PATTEE, DIANE MARIE, Colts Neck, NJ, 
Accounting. Accounting Club; Emory 
Business Team; OA. 

PATTEN, ELIZABETH ANN, Williams- 
burg. Physics. Chorus; L-5 Society; 
Backdrop Club. 

PATTERSON, DONALD JOSEPH, Livings- 
ton, NJ. Government. Intramurals. 

PATTERSON, LILLIAN VIRGINIA, Clarks- 
ville, TN. English. William and Mary 
Review. 



PATTON, JEFFEREY ROSS, Winchester. 
History/Government. Choir, Stage 
Manager; Phi Mu Alpha; Sinfonia; HSO, 
President; Phi Alpha Theta, Vice Presi- 
dent; Project Plus; Russian House; 
Washington Program; Intramurals. 

PAWLOWSKI, EDLEEN FRANCES, Vienna. 
Government. Kappa Kappa Gamma; 
VAPIRG; Government Club; Russian Club. 

PAYNE, LISA GRACE, Williamsburg. 
Chemistry. Chemistry Club. 

PAYNE, MARK DAVID, Springfield. 
Accounting. Accounting Club; WMCF; 
Intramurals. 



PEACOCK, BRENDA SHARON, Chickasaw, 

AL. Geology. Kappa Alpha Theta. 
PEDERSEN, ROBERT JOHN, Fairfax. 

Economics. Varsitv Baseball; Intramurals. 
PERALTA, CHERYL MARIE, Jericho, 

NY. English. 
PERRINE, WILLIAM CHADWICK, Ashland, 

KY. History/Government. 



PERUFFO, DIANE M„ Pleasant Valley, 

NY. Economics. Director's Workshop; Circle 

K; BSU. 
PETCHUL, CAROL ANN, Springfield. 

Business Administration/Accounting. Delta 

Delta Delta, Treasurer; Orchesis; 

Accounting Club. 
PETERSON, CHERYL ANN, Arlington. 

Biology. Catholic Student Association; 

Circle K; Kappa Delta; Biology Club. 
PHILLIPS, DENISE AUDREY, Winchester. 

Secondary Education. Phi Mu; Senior 

Class Publicity Committee. 



PHILLIPS, DORI ANN, Bernardsville, 
NJ. English. Alpha Lambda Delta; Chorus; 
Evensong; Phi Mu, Songleader, Activi- 
ties Chairman. 

PHILLIPS, ROY F., II. Norfolk. Economics. 
Kappa Sigma; Intramurals. 

PIERCE, JAMES HAROLD, Grafton. 
Government. 

PILLAI, SEETHA K., Williamsburg. 
Spanish/English. 



Seniors/331 



*♦»♦».»♦»♦» 



»♦♦»♦»» *1 



GO NUTS OVER 



***************** *.L 



PINKHAM, AUDREY LYNN, Huntington, 
NY. Linguistics. Dorm Council; 
Orchesis, Wardrobe Mistress; WATS; Phi 
Mu; Alpha Lambda Delta. 

PINTO, COLLEEN MARIE, Suffolk. Govern- 
ment. Catholic Student Association; 
International Circle; RA; Order of the White 
Jacket; Dorm Council, President. 



PLAAG, GARY KENNETH, Springfield. 

Government. German House; OA; 

Sinfonieron; Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia; Dorm 

Council; AFS; Canoe Club. 
PLATT, CHRISTINA MARIE, Waldorf, 

MD. Biology. 



PLUMLY, REBECCA ANNE, Alexandria. 
Elementary Education. Circle K; 
Intramurals. 

PLUNKETT, JAMES JERILL, Marietta, 
GA. Chemistry. Sigma Chi; Canter- 
bury Association; Swim Team; Colonial 
Echo. 



POOL, EDWARD FULLER, JR., Portsmouth. 
Economics. Sigma Pi, Social Chair- 
man; Intramurals. 

POPE, RENA BLANCHE, Richmond. 
Accounting. Circle K; Delta Delta Delta, 
Assistant Treasurer; OA; Accounting 
Club; Intramurals. 

POPMAN, ELAINE MARIE, Scotch Plains, 
NJ. English. Project Plus; Dorm Coun- 
cil; English Advisory Board. 

POTTER, HOLLY ANN, Altavista. Econo- 
mics. Alpha Lambda Delta. 



POTTS, JAMES WOODWARD, Barhams- 
ville. Business Administration. Lambda 
Chi Alpha. 

POULSON, ELISA JOY, Hallwood. Biology. 
BSU; Cirlce K; Help Unlimited. 

PRITCHARD, PATRICIA LETTIE, Hopewell. 
Elementary Education. Dorm Council, 
Vice President; J.V. Cheerleader; 
BSU; Kappa Delta Pi; Student Education 
Association, President; Delta Delta 
Delta, Correspondent, Songleader; Varsity 
Cheerleader; "Damn Yankees." 

PROPERT, CHRISTOPHER BARNES, 
Richmond. Psychology/Philosophy. Psy- 
chology Club; William and Mary 
Review. 

PROSCINO, CHERYL LYNN, Gradyville, 
PA. Accounting. Hockey, Captain; 
Lacrosse; Chi Omega, Vocations Chairman; 
Accounting Club; Intramurals; Dorm 
Council. 

PUGH, ERNEST OLIN, Columbia, SC. 
Biology. OA; Phi Sigma; Pi Kappa Alpha, 
Pike Marathon Chairman. 

PURDY, TED JOSEPH, Gardiner, ME. 
Biology. Intramurals; Catholic Student 
Association. 

PUSTER, DAVID WALDEN, Williams- 
burg. Physical Education. NCAA; Wrest- 
ling; PE Majors Club; ROTC. 




332/Seniors 



PEANUTS 



♦♦»»♦♦♦♦» 



» ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 




Peanut butter. Peanut 
brittle. Chocolate- 
covered peanuts. Peanut 
mixtures. Fresh roasted 
peanuts, in bags, in barrels, 
in just about anything you 
could think of. Where, you 
may ask, can the peanut 
fanatic indulge in such 
glories of the lowly nut? 
At the Peanut Shop just off 
Prince George Street, of 
course! Almost every W&M 
student knows that, at least 
by the end of their first 
semester. That's because the 
Peanut Shop also stocks many 
other kinds of nuts, assorted 
mixtures, and even fruitcake 
as well. 

So give in; how can you walk past 
the door and catch a heavenly 
whiff of those fresh roasting 
peanuts without buying at least a 

JANET BOYCE samples the scrumptious 
treats found at the Peanut Shop. 



««««««««« 



♦ ♦•♦♦»»»♦» 




QUIGG, KAREN ELIZABETH, Annandale. 
Geology. Delta Delta Delta. Reference 
Chairman, Social Chairman. 



RACZENBEK, CYNTHIA MARGARET, 
Bethelehem, PA. Biology. Chi Omega: 
Phi Sigma; College Republicans; WATS; 
Hotline. 



RACZKOWSKI, GARY GEORGE, Nagatuck, 
CT. Business Administration. Pi Kappa 
Alpha; Dorm Council; Intraraurals; 
SA Senate, Elections Chairman. 



RAMSEY, HARRIET NAWASA, Henry. 
Business Management. Kappa Alpha 
Theta; BSU; J.V. Volleyball; Theatre Cos- 
tume Assistant: Senior Class Publicity 
Committee. 

RAMSEY, KELVIN WHEELER, Phenix. 
Geology/Classical Studies. Sigma 
Gamma Epsilon; Classics Club, President; 
BSU. 

REARDON, KATHLEEN S., McLean. 
Elementary Education. Kappa Delta, Assis- 
tant Social Chairman; OA. 

REILLY, PAUL DAVID. Westfield. N.J. 
Biology. Phi Eta Sigma; Band; Phi Sigma. 

RENZ, DAVID W., Williamsburg. Philos- 
ophy/Historv. Kappa Alpha, MD Chairman. 

RETER, .JANiNE LOUISE, Richmond. 
Economics. Volleyball; Dorm Council; 
Pi Beta Phi, President. 

RHODES, TODD MC ALLISTER, Martins- 
ville. Business Management. Kappa 
Alpha, Treasurer; Intramurals. 

RHYNE, MARTHA ANN. Norfolk. Econo- 
mics/Computer Science. Dorm Council; 
Kappa Delta; Omicron Delta Epsilon; 
ACM; Economics Students Association. 



RICHARDSON. RHONDA ANNE, Berea. 

OH. Psychology. Circle K; Psychology 

Club; Dorm Council; Orchestra. 
RICHTER. TODD B., New Rochelle. NY. 

Business. Golf Team; Ski Club. 
RILEY, KARA LEIGH, Vienna. Biology. 

Spanish House; Phi Sigma; Dorm Council. 
RILEY, STEVEN A., Arlington. 

Economics. 



Seniors/.333 



* ♦ » » * 



♦ ♦ ♦ * ♦ 



****** 



******** 



******** 



***************** 

In describing his impres- 
sion of W&M after four 
years, senior Terry Pool had a 
definite point to make: "W&M 
can afford to be very selective. 
The school has an excellent 
reputation and it's difficult 
to get in. But once you get 
here, it's sort of an ego de- 
flator. There's a lots of qual- 
ity — everyone came from the 
top of his class — so you don't 
tend to stand out anymore." 

Despite this view, Terry 
apparently had no difficulties 
making a place for himself at 
the College. His time here 
was highlighted being a member 
of Sigma Pi fraternity and 
carrying out his duties as 
social chairman. He was also 
an active participant in the 
soccer and bowling intramural 
programs. 

Perhaps the overall high 
standards set for students 
resulted in a definite bonus; 
Terry felt he did succeed in 
in obtaining a very good 
liberal arts education. 
Completing a major in Econom- 
ics, he planned to enter the 
job market immediately after 
graduation and had banking 
opportunities in mind. Dis- 
cussing longer-range goals, 
Terry concluded, "Not right 



************it****1,1,*1,1,1,i,1,H1,1,1,1,i,i,f, 



* * * * * 




»f/./'-V^*. 



away — I want to work for a. 
while — I hope to go to grad 
school to obtain my master's 
in business." 



» ******* 



********************* 



SENIOR TERRY POOL feels the abundance 
of quality here sometimes leads to an 
"ego deflator." 



*********l^l^*l^l^*^^^^^ 



RINGEL, MARK ROBERT, Norwich, CT, 

Accounting. 
RITSON, JONATHAN LEE, Oswego. 

NY. Biology/Business. Cross Country; 

Track. 
RIVELL, ELIZABETH ANN, Whitehouse 

Station, NJ. Accounting. Delta Delta 

Delta, President, Sinking Fund Treasurer; 

Dorm Council; Intramurals; Catholic 

Student Association. 
RIZZO, DAVID PAUL, Armonk, NY. 

Economics. Pi Kappa Alpha; Intramurals. 



ROBINSON, PAUL C, Providence Forge. 
Business Management. 

RODRIGUEZ, MICHAEL A., Upper Saddle 
River, NJ. Philosophy. 

ROGERS. SANDRA KAY, Yale. Business 
Management. Delta Delta Delta, Scho- 
larship Chairman. 

ROSSI, ROBERTA MARIE, Smithfield, RI. 
Government. Young Democrats. 




334/Seniors 



SENIOR PROFILE 




ROSSITER. KEVIN ALLAN, Margate, NJ, 
Biology. Publications Council, Chair- 
man; Washington Program; FHC; Circle K, 
tutoring; Mortar Board. 

ROTHACKER, ROBERT DONALD, Newark, 
DE. Economics/Philosophy. ODE; 
Kappa Alpha; Tennis. 

ROTHBERG, ELIZABETH CELIA, Rich- 
mond. Sociology, Phi Mu, Corres- 
ponding Secretary, Assistant Phi Director. 

RUPP, JEFF DOUGLAS, Mt. Vernon. 

Economics. Sigma Chi; Omicron Delta Ep- 
silon; Senior Class, Social Chairman. 



RUSH, DEBORAH LYNNE, Appomattox. 

English. Band; College Republicans; 

English Club; Senior Class Publicity 

Committee. 
RYAN, JOSEPH MICHAEL FRANCIS, III, 

Bethesda, MD. Philosophy. William 

and Mary Hall, Stage Manager; FHC; Pi 

Kappa Alpha; Philosophy Club. 
RYAN, SUSAN ANNE, Princeton Junction, 

NJ. English/Philosophy. 
SACCONE, STEPHANIE ANN, Scott AFB, 

IL. English. 



ST.LOUIS, EILEEN MARIE, McLean. 

Economics. Kappa Alpha Theta, 

Songleader, Commissary Chairman; 

French House. 
SALMON, DOUGLAS REID, Colts Neck, 

NJ. Biology/History. Pi Lambda Phi; 

Wrestling; Lacrosse; PFB; Outing Club; 

Circle K; Biology Club; Ski Team. 
SAMFORD, PATRICIA MERLE, Lawrence- 

viUe. Anthropology/Psychology. 

William and Man' Review: Anthropology 

Club 
SAMPSON, TIMOTHY B., Burke. 

Economics. 



SAUNDERS, WILLIAM EDWARD, HI, 

Mechanicsyille. Computer Science. 
SAUNDERS, WILLIAM PAUL, Springfield. 

Accounting. Phi Eta Sigma; Asia 

House; Accounting Club. 
SAVAGE, J. THOMAS, Exmore. Art History. 

FHC; Evensong; Canterbury Association. 
SAVAGE, MALCOLM BROOKS, Potters- 

ville, NJ. History/Goyernment. 



SCANLAN, LISA ANNE, Cedar Rapids, 
lA. English. 

SCANLAN, SHEILA MAREE, Alexandria. 
Theatre/Speech. 

SCHEK, JOYCE LYNN, Cockeysville, 
MD. Accounting. Dorm Council; Outing 
Club; Accounting Club; Young Democrats. 

SCHERTZ. LOIS REBECCA, Herndon. 
Math/Economics. Circle K; Omicron 
Delta Epsilon; Catholic Student Association. 



SCHIER, BETSY, Pepper Pike, OH. 
Business Management. Pi Delta Phi; Delta 
Delta Delta. 

SCHIRMER, MARTHA, Weston, CT. 
English. Christian Science Organization. 
Secretary, President; CaMU; Pi Delta 
Phi; Alpha Chi Omega, 3rd Vice-President. 

SCHULTZ, MARY FLORENCE, Richmond. 
English. Dorm Council; Circle K; In- 
tramurals; Director's Workshop. 

SCHWARZ, JAMES PETER, Coconut Creek, 
FL. Business Management. Dorm Coun- 
cil, President; Interhall; SA, Par- 
liamentarian; Sigma Chi, Vice-President. 
Treasurer; Cheerleader; Intramurals. 



Seniors/335 



»»»»»»♦♦♦»»♦♦♦»♦♦ 



SCOTT, CHARLES GRANVILLE, Richmond. 
Theatre/Speech. W&M Theatre, Actor. 



STRUTTING ON 



SCOTT, SUSAN ELIZABETH, Gladys. 
Elementary Education. Phi Kappa Tau 
Sweetheart. 



SEBACHER, KIM SUSAN, Seaford. Physics. 
Society of Physics Students; Young 
Democrats. 



SENDELBACH, KAREN LA VINA, Cin- 
cinnati, OH. Accounting. Alpha Chi Omega, 

Recording Secretary, Scholarship 

Chairman; Accounting Club. 
SENTMAN, CATHERINE SUZ, Wilmington, 

DE. English/Music Choir; Chorus; 

Evensong; Sinfonicron; Delta Omicron. 

Vice-President; WMCF; Project Plus; 

Cambridge Progr&m; Russian Studies 

House; French Honor Society. 
SETTLEMYER, REBECCA FERN, Temple 

Hills, MD. English. WMCF; Core 

group leader. 
SETZER, KATHY LEE, Alexandria. 

Economics/Philosophy. Alpha Chi Omega; 

Dorm Council; Philosophy Club; 

Economics Club; Circle K. 

SHAFFRAN, .JAMES S., Fairfax. Govern- 
ment. Choir; Botetourt Chamber Singers. 

SHARP, CHARLOTTE GRAY, Rober- 
sonville, NC. French. Pi Beta Phi; Mer- 
mettes; Junior Year Abroad. 

SHELBY, LYNNE, Kinnelon, NJ. 
Business Management. Dorm Council. 

SHELTON, NANCY B., Charleston, WV. 
Government/History. RA; Mortar Board; 
Honor Council; Phi Alpha Theta; 
Alpha Lambda Delta; Pi Sigma Alpha; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



SHERIDAN, REBECCA LEE, Crozet. 
Biology. Evensong; Chorus; Biology Club; 
Mermettes. 

SHIELDS, MARY ELLEN, Oak Hall. 
Mathematics. Kappa Alpha Theta, Assis- 
tant Treasurer, Rush Counselor; BSU; 
Intramurals. 

SHIPPER. REBECCA ANNE, Brownstown, 
PA. American Studies. Phi Mu. 

SHILAN, STEPHEN B., Albany, GA. 
Mathematics/Philosophy. 




336/Seniors 



DOWN DOG STREET 



********»*♦« 




SHINE, FRANCES ELIZABETH. Ports- 
mouth. Accounting. Circle K; WATS. 

SHREVE, MARY ANNE, Great Falls. 
English. Evensong; Flat Hat. 



SIEBENTRITT, CARL ROBERT, McLean. 
International Affairs. Phi Eta Sigma, 
Vice President; Phi Alpha Theta; ROTC; 
Fencing; Phi Kappa Tau, Secretary. 

SILKWORTH, WILLIAM RYON, Greens- 
boro, NC. History. Circle K; VAPIRG: 
W&M ACLU; Colonial Echo. 



SILVERMAN, BRUCE ALTON, Petersburg. 

Fine Arts. Sigma Phi Epsilon, Chaplain; 

Intramurals. 
SIMMONS, KAREN LAURIE. Manassas. 

Theatre. Premiere Theatre; W&M Theatre; 

Director's Workshop; Backdrop Club; 

Sinfonicron; Orchesis. President. 



SIMMONS, KATHRYN ANN, Manassas. 
History. Orchesis, W&M Theatre. 

SIMPSON, PATRICIA LOUISE, Williams- 
burg. Computer Science. WMCF. 

SKOGLUND, VIRGINIA MARVIN, Mil- 
ford, MA. Economics/Government. 
Bacon Street, Government Club. 

SKOVRAN, NADINE, Trumbull, CT. Phy- 
sics/Computer Science. SA; Alpha 
Lambda Delta; Society of Physics Students; 
Intramurals. 



SLAUGHTER, DOUGLAS ANTHONY. 

Draper. Classical Studies. Circle K; 

BSO; Wrestling. 
SMITH, BEVERLY GIBBS, Staunton. 

Psychology. Rugby; Theatre; Circle K. 
SMITH. CYNTHIA ELAINE, Woodbridge. 

Computer Science. 
SMITH, DAVID HARPER, South Boston. 

Accounting. Pi Kappa Alpha; Accounting 

Club. 



SMITH:. DEBORAH HUDSON. Wilmington. 
DE. Sociology/German. Alpha Chi 
Omega. Social Chairman; SA, Secretary 

SMITH, EDMUND REED, IH. Newtown, 
CT. Art History/History. Colonial 
Echo: Flat Hat: Society of Collegiate 

SMITH, HOWARD TALMON, JR., Stuart. 

Economics/Government. 
SMITH, KIMBERLY ANNE, Toano. 

Anthropology. Anthropology Club. 



Seniors/337 



♦ ♦♦»»»» 



l^:^lf.l^l^■**'>■***'^■*** 



lf.l^.l^.l^.}^.l^l^l^l^lt■lt■ 



♦ ♦***»»»♦»•»»♦»»♦ 



SMITH, REBECCA ELIZABETH, Mobile, 

AL. History. 
SMITH, RICHARD ALAN, McLean. 

Biology. Pi Kappa Alpha; Biology Club; 

Circle K; Intramurals. 
SMITH, RICHARD HOLLADAY, IH, 

Harrisonburg. Chemistry. Sigma Chi, House 

Manager. 
SNARR, SUSAN ELIZABETH, Raphine. 

Elementary Education. OA; Majorettes, 

Co-Captain. 



SNEDIKER, SUSAN JAYNE, Marietta, 
OH. French. SA; BSA; French House; De- 
bate; International Circle; Junior Year 
Abroad; Alpha Chi Omega, Social Functions 
Assistant Chairman. 

SOLIS, MICHAEL TAYLOR, Freehold, 
NJ. Economics. OA; Pi Lambda Phi; 
Intramurals; ROTC; Color Guard. 



SONNENBERG, KYLE RUSSELL, Chester. 
Interdisciplinary. Dorm Council; 
Interhall; College Republicans, Vice Presi- 
dent; Lutheran Student Association, 
Secretary, Vice President; Flat Hat, Ad- 
vertising Manager, Circulation Manager; 
Society of Collegiate Journalists. 

SOUTHARD, ROBIN LYNN, Stanards- 
ville. Elementary Education. Phi Mu, 
House President; Intramurals; Circle K; 
Citizen Advocacy Program. 



SOUZA, RAYMOND MANUEL, West Point. 
Sociology. WMCF, President; Intra- 
murals; Catholic Student Association; 
Sociology Club. 

SPICER, PAMELA SUE, Charlottesville. 
Elementary Education. Pi Beta Phi, 
Publicity Chairman; OA; Student Education 
Association. 



SPILLER, MARGERY SCOTT, Fredericks- 
burg. Biology. WRA; Dorm Council, 
Treasurer; Outing Club; Biology Club. 

SPRINGATE, GRACE E., Baltimore, MD. 
GermanATheatre. Junior Year Abroad; 
Premiere Theatre; Alpha Lambda Delta; 
German House. 



SPRINGER, MARIANNE GAIL, Garden 
City, NY. Biology. Head Resident; 
RA; Delta Delta Delta; Panhel; OA; Dorm 
Council; Phi Sigma. 

SPURLING, FRANCES ANN, St. Georges, 
Bermuda. English. Tennis; Colonial Echo. 

SPURLOCK, MARTHA ANN, Petersburg. 
Biology. Lectures Committee; Inter- 
disciplinary Committee. 

STAMPFLI, ELLEN S., Norfolk. Sociology. 
Kappa Alpha Theta. Vice-President 
of Pledge Education. 




^.k 




k^; y""^ 




Heard about the latest 
Jackson Browne release? 
Or are you a Keith Jarrett fan, 

* frantically searching for a 
•■ record store that shares your 
^ exotic taste? Relax, if 
»• you're wondering where to find 

* it, the Band Box is the only 

* logical place to go. They 
«. offer a large selection of re- 

* cordings, including jazz, rock, 

* punk, beach and just about any 
^ other style of music for the 

* discriminating listener; even 

* keeping up with new trends like 
^ the recent reggae rage. A 

* convenient and efficient order- 
*■ ing service guarantees ful- 

^ fillment of one's most ob- 

» scure desires. Particularly 

* helpful and knowledgeable sales 

* staff adds to the Band Box's 
» appeal. Best of all, for the 

» typically thin college wallet, 

* the store holds frequent sales 
^ that reduce their already low 
» prices. So the next time you 

* encounter some peculiar auditory 

* craving, head to the Band Box 
» and satisfaction. 

* 

» A SPECIAL HALLOWEEN MIDNIGHT 

» SALE attracted William and Mary stu- 

» dents to the Bandbox. Already low 

* prices were slashed even lower for this 

* special occasion. 
* 

» 

******************** 




338/Seniors 



BAND BOX 




STANLEY, MARTHA RUTH, Arlington. 
Economics/Fine Arts. Kappa Alpha Theta 

STARK, ELIZABETH MARY, Aquebogue, 
NY. English. Sinfonicron; W&M 
Theatre; Premiere Theatre; Director's 
Theatre; Dorm Council; Flat Hat: Writers 
Club. 

STARR, JUDITH ROXANNE, Alexandria. 
English. Kappa Delta, House Presi- 
dent; Alpha Lambda Delta; OA; Flat Hat: 
Chorus. 

STATON, LESLIE MARIE, Fort Smith, 
AR. History. Alpha Chi Omega; Circle 
K; OA; RA; Colonial Echo, Academics 
Editor, Editor-in-Chief; Society 
of Collegiate Journalists. 

STEEL, ELLEN LOUISE, Medford Lakes, 
NJ. Biology. Chi Omega, Personnel 
Chairman; Cheerleading; OA. 

STEIN, DANIEL JOSHUA, Alexandria. 
Biology. Band; Orchestra; Phi Sigma. 



STEINBERG, ANDY DAVID, Morristown, 
NJ. Business Management. Lambda 
Chi Alpha; SA Refrigerator Rentals 
Director. 

STELL, JEFFERY ALAN, Alexandria. 
Computer Science. Phi Eta Sigma; Com- 
puter Consultant; Intramurals. 



STEPHAN, ANNE E., McLean. Business 
Management. Swim Team; Mer- 
mettes; Chi Omega, Social Chairman; SA, 
Publicity Committee. 

STERN, CHARLES JAY, Newport News. 
Business Management. Intramurals. 



STERN, RONALD WILLIAM, Hampton. 
Government. Debate Club; Dorm 
Council; Circle K; Hillel Director; Govern- 
ment Club. 

STEVENSON, DEBORAH JAN, Sterling. 
Business Management. Evensong; 
Spanish House; WCWM; Dorm Council, 
Vice-President; RA. 



STIEHL, PATRICIA ANN, Waynesboro. 
Art Historv. Senior Publicitv Committee. 

STILL, WILLIAM JOHN PETER, Rich- 
mond. Biologv. Colonial Echo. 

STRONG, DEBORAH SUSAN, Springfield. 
English/Government. Society of 
Collegiate Journalists; Government Honor 
Society; Flat Hat. News Editor. 

STUMM. SHARON MARIE. Alexandria. 
Math/Economics. OA; SA Senator; 
RA; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Inner Social 
Chairman; Junior Personnel Representative. 



Senior.s/339 



♦ ♦♦¥*¥*¥♦♦*» 



♦ ♦ * ♦ 



'^'^*'^'^'^'^'^■'^*'^**'^>^'^l^*^l^>^l^l^l^l^l^l^t^:f.l^lflflfJf_lf_lf_:^,f:f.^lf.^lf^^ 



******************************************************************** 




The William and Mary stu- 
dent, looking for the 
best in gentleman's apparel, has 
only to enter Frazier-Graves in 
Merchant's Square. Once inside, 
he will realize that this 
is the establishment to pat- 
ronize — Frazier-Graves special- 
izes in quality men's clothing. 

Quality is the key to Frazier- 
Graves' excellence. It offers 
the best in anything the 
businessman, man-about-town, 
or college student might need. 
For the discriminating gentle- 
man, all types of clothing are 



available: sweaters, shirts, 
and slacks for casual wear, 
track shorts and sweat suits 
for athletic activities, and 
suits, jackets, and ties for 
formal occasions. Frazier- 
Graves also offers unique and 
necessary accessories for 
everyday wear or use. There 
are hats, gloves, and ties of 
all descriptions, and suitbags, 
travel bags, and other travel 
accessories for that business 
or pleasure trip. Frazier- 
Graves is also the place to 
shop for the friend or relative 



LOCATED ON DUKE OF GLOUCESTER 
Street, Frazier-Graves offers the best in men's 
apparel. 

who appreciates quality. 
Helpful and tasteful salesmen 
are always ready to assist the 
customer in choosing just the 
right gift, one that reflects 
the high standards of both 
giver and receiver. 

Frazier-Graves suggests ex- 
cellence. Therefore, those 
who appreciate quality shop 
Frazier-Graves — the symbol of 
excellence. 



STURGILL, LOWELL VERNON, JR.. 
Clarksville, MD. Government/Philosophy. 
WMCF; Young Life Leadership; Intra- 
murals; Dorm Council; Young Democrats. 

SULHOFF, .JAMES DAVID. Council 
Bluffs, lA. Economics. Sigma Chi. 

SULLIVAN, DENNIS .J., Bryn Mawr, 
PA. English. Order of the White .Jacket. 

SUNDQUIST, PAUL D., Annandale. Ac- 
counting. Navigators; WMCF; Alpha Sigma 
Gamma; Intramurals. 





L^^k 



SUSHEREBA, WENDY WHITE, Cranbury, 

NJ. Elementary Education. Soccer; 

OA; Tutoring. 
TAYLOR, PAGE DERIEUX, Hanover. 

Accounting. Alpha Chi Omega. 
TEABO, MARY KATHRYN, Richmond. 

Elementary Education. OA; Orchesis; Phi 

Mu; Project Plus; Flat Hat 
TEETER, GEORGE GEOFFREY, West 

Berlin, N.J. Economics. WMCF. Core 

Group Leader; Omieron Delta Epsilon; Phi 

Alpha Theta. 




340/Seniors 



FRAZIER-GRAVES 



♦ »»»»»»»»»j,»A^»,l<l,l^l»»4f 




THODE, STEVEN ROBERT. Port Washing- 
ton, NY. Philosophy. President's Aide; 
Philosophy Club; Educational Policy 
Committee; Planning and Priorities Com- 
mittee; Colonial Echo. Media Editor; 
WCWM; BSA; SA; OA; Mortar Board; 
ODK; Society of Collegiate Journalists. 

THOMAS, SANDRA GAYLE. Amherst. 
Accounting. Phi Mu, Corresponding 
Secretary. Panhel Representative; Ac- 
counting Club; OA; Alpha Lambda Delta. 

THOMSEN, JEFFREY TOWN, Glenside, 
PA. History. Kappa Alpha. 

TIMBERLAKE, LINDA LEIGH, Richmond. 
Mathematics. Alpha Lambda Delta. 

TIPTON, CAROL LEE, Waynesboro. 

Biology. Phi Sigma; OA; RA; J.V. Basket- 
ball; Swim Team; Circle K; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma. House President. 

TITO, HUGH F., Fort Gordon, GA. 
History. Intramurals; ROTC. 

TODD, CAROL RUTH, Richmond. Ac- 
counting. Gamma Phi Beta, Assistant Rit- 
ual Chairman; Chorus. 

TRBOVICH, NANCY LYNN, Mansfield, OH. 
History/English. Kappa Kappa Gamma, 
President; Evensong; OA; Phi Alpha Theta; 
Dorm Council, Vice President; Pi 
Kappa Alpha Sweetheart; Washington 
Program; Cambridge Program. 

TRESTER, HOLLIDAY STEELE, Orange. 
Biology. Rugby Club, President; 
Gamma Phi Beta. 

TRIBLE, ANNE BROOKE, Dunnsville. 
History. Honor Council, Chairperson; RA; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; President's 
Aide; Phi Alpha Theta; Mortar Board. 

TRIPP, BERNICE E., Bryn Mawr, PA. 
Biology. Delta Sigma Theta; Ebony Ex- 
pressions. 

TROTMAN, CHRISTY CAROLINE, Ports- 
mouth. Psychology/Sociology. 

TSCHIRGI, TRENT ALAN, Columbia, MD. 
Sociology/Biology. WMCF; Canoe 
Club; Radio Club. 

TUGGLE, NORA ANN, Vienna. Biology. 
Dorm Council; Gymnastics. 

TURBIVILLE, JOSEPH WILSON, Danville. 
Business Administration. 

TURGEON. LORRAINE MARIE, Princeton, 
NJ, Government/Psychology. SAC, Secre- 
tary, Social Committee Secretary, 
Pub Liason; Dorm Council; Psychology 
Club; Government Club; Ski Club; 
Field Hockey; WRA Representative; Intra- 
murals. 

TURMAN, ANN ELIZABETH, Charlottes- 
ville. Biology. Circle K; Biology 
Club. 

TUTHILL, DAVID W., Cutchoque, NY. 
Accounting. Accounting Club; Band; Senior 
Publicity and Graduation Committees; 
OA. 

TUTHILL, DIANE LORRAINE, Washington. 
Elementary Education. Circle K; 
Evensong; Student Education Association. 

TYNDALL, LARRY WILLIAM, Newark, 
MD. Psychology. Psychology Club; WMCF; 
Circle K. 



UREK. ALAN S., Glenside, PA. Sociology/ 
Fine Arts. 

UTHAPPA, MACHIA MAPANGADA, 
Mysore, India. 

VALENTINE. CYNTHIA BIRDSALL, 
Alexandria. Elementary Education. Chorus; 
Choir; Evensong; Kappa Delta Pi, 
Membership Chairman; SNEA, Vice Presi- 
dent; WATS; OA. 

VARRONE, JERRIE S., Arlington. French. 
Pi Delta Phi; Kappa Delta, Assistant 
Rush Chairman, Vice President; Sigma 
Iota Chi. 



Seniors/341 



* ♦ » ♦ ♦ 



♦ »♦»»»»♦» 



♦ ♦»♦♦»♦»»• 



BEECROFT 



VERLANDER, RICHARD HENRY, JR., 
Weems. Government. Intramurals; 
Varsity Baseball. 

VIEHWEG, KERI S., Austin, TX. Sociology/ 
Fine Arts. Chorus; Choir; Botetourt 
Chamber Singers; Delta Omicron, Publicity 
Chairman, Music Director. 

VITALIS, DAVID KEEFE, Lake Ridge. 
Business Management. Young Republicans 
Club. 

VLANNES, KATHERINE, Fairfax. Ac- 
counting. Circle K; International Circle; 
Accounting Club; Homecoming Committee. 



VOEGELIN, STEPHEN PETER, Newport 
News. History/Government. HSO; 
Science Fiction Club; Classics Club. 

VON OETTINGEN, SUSANNA LISA- 
LOTTE, Manassas. Biology. Circle K; 
Biology Club; Dorm Council. 

WAGNER, CARYN ANNE, Nurnberg, 
Germany. English/History. Dorm Council, 
Vice President; Project Plus; Phi 
Alpha Theta; HSO; English Club; OA; 
Cambridge Program; ROTC; Intra- 
murals; Scabbard & Blade. 

WAGNER, MICHAEL JOSEPH, Franklin, 
PA. Business Management. Foot- 
ball; FCA; Kappa Sigma, House Manager. 



WALKER, RICHARD JOHN, Bel Air, MD. 
Geology. Colonial Echo, Photo- 
grapher; Flat Hat, Photographer; Sigma 
Gamma Epsilon; Society of Collegiate 
Journalists; William and Mary Theatre, 
Photographer. 

WALLACE, BEVERLY ANITA, Portsmouth. 
Elementary Education. BSO, Secre- 
tary; Ebony Expressions; Tutoring; Kappa 
Delta Pi. 

WALTON, SUSAN ANDREA, Newport News. 
Biology. Phi Sigma. 

WARD, ANN CUTCHIN, Suffolk. Psychology. 
BSU; WMCF; WMTV; Centex; Di- 
rector's Workshop. 



WARD, KIMBERLY RENEE, Roanoke. 
English. College Republicans; Anthropology 
Club; Psychology Club; International 
Circle. 



WARD, LAURENCE RICHARD, Alexandria. 
Philosophy/English. Pi Kappa Alpha; Intra- 
murals. 



WARE, REX D., Newport News. Government. 
Kappa Alpha, Corresponding Secre- 
tary. Recording Secretary; Intramurals; 
Bacon Street. 




• »»»»»»»»»»»»•»♦••»»¥»♦••♦••♦» 







^ 












for Cm:l,;mn ,„„1 L.i,: 
,11 llir l„„ Coii Cliih II, 
W,llu„„sb:uii 220-1: 



****************************** 



342/Seniors 



& BULL, LTD. 




******* 



WARNER, PAMELA SUE. McLean. 
Accounting. Phi Mu; Accounting Club: 
VoUevball; Intramurals. 

WARREN, SUSAN BRADFORD, Virginia 
Beach. Business Management. 

WASHER, CHERYL E., Roanoke. Fine 
Arts. Alpha Lambda Delta; Badminton; Phi 
Alpha Theta. 

WASHKO.SUSAN, Morrisvillc, PA. Eng- 
lish. Dorm Council; RA; Spanish House. 



WATERMAN, AVERY T., JR., Williams- 
burg. Economics. President's Aide; 
Mortar Board, Elections Chairperson; 
Omicron Delta Epsilon; BSA, Chairman. 
Finance Committee Chairman; Theta 
Delta Chi; Colonial Echo: Intramurals. 

WATKINS, ANNE CLARKE, South Hill. 
English. Chi Omega, Social Chairman 
Rush Chairman; WATS. 

WATSON, LISA KAY, Poquoson. Eng- 
lish. English Club; Botetourt Bibliographi- 
cal Society. 

WAYLAND; SCOTT PROSSER, Satellite 
Beach. FL. English/Philosophy. 
Phi Eta Sigma; William and Man Reuieu: 
Poetry Editor; Project Plus; St. Andrews 
Exchange Scholar. 

WEATHERSBEE, LISA MARIE, Williams- 
burg. Fine Arts. Alpha Chi Omega; 
Circle K. 

WEAVER, SCOTT CAMERON, Lower 
Marlboro, MD. Biology. Phi Eta Sigma; 
Mortar Board; Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Vice President; Phi Sigma; Circle K, Vice 
President; Biology Club; Dorm Coun- 
cil, President; RA. 

WEBER, CYNTHIA JOAN, Fairfax. Psy- 
chology. Alpha Chi Omega, House 
President; OA. 

WEINSTEIN, BARRY EVAN, Newport 
News. Fine Arts. 



WEITHONER, KATHERINE SUE, Silver 
Spring, MD. English. WMCF; Junior 
Year Abroad. 

SWELLFORD. ANN DRURY, Richmond. 
English. Cambridge Program. 



WELLONS, CATHERINE ANN, Colonial 
Heights. Mathematics/Computer 
Science. Flag Squad; Alpha Phi Omega. 

WETTERER, KATHERINE C, Huntington, 
NY. Elementary Education. Chi 
Omega; OA; Kappa Delta Pi. 



WHEELER, GREGORY ALLEN, Lynch- 
burg. History. BSL', Folk Team; 
Pi Kappa Alpha; Intramurals. 

WHEELER, JULIA LEE, Roanoke. Govern- 
ment. OA; Kappa Kappa Gamma, 
Corresponding Secretary, Rush Chairman; 
Washington Program. 



******** 



Seniors/343 



''■***>^>^|^l^l^>^^l^lf.lf.lf.^^,^,^^l^l^l,. 



»»»»»•»♦♦♦♦ 



♦ ♦»»»»»»♦»»» 



»»»♦»»♦♦»»♦♦ 



WHITMIRE, ANNE CORLEY, Arlington. 
History. Chorus; Choir; International 
Circle. 

WHITTICO, GLORIA ANN, Hampton. 
English/Philosophy. BSO; Ebony Expres- 
sions, Secretary. 

WIESEMAN, KATHERINE CLAIRE, 
McLean. Biology. Spanish House; Dorm 
Council; Gamma Phi Beta; Swim Team; 
Alpha Lambda Delta. 

WILLETT, STEVE B., Fairfax. Accounting. 
WCWM; Flat Hat: Circle K; FHC; 
United Skiers; Help Unlimited. 

****************** 
* 

* I "' oday has been one of those 

* M. days that you would like to 
^ forget. Tests, classes, and 

* labs have kept you on the run 

* from nine to six. But now it 
^ is six o'clock and time for 

« dinner. Visions of a hot, 

* satisfying, home-cooked meal 

* float through your head. Un- 
« fortunately, the Caf is serving 
« corned beef with sauerkraut 

* or hot dogs and beans in bar- 
^ becue sauce. Your abused sto- 
« mach refuses to try to handle 

* it. What is worse, it is 20 

^ degrees and raining outside, 

« you lost your umbrella, you 

* live in Brown Hall, and you 

* just missed the bus to the 




***** 



******* 



Caf. What do you do? You 
head for the Campus Restaurant 
(better known as George's) 
where under the protective, 
all-seeing eye of Mary Dallas, 
head waitress, you can order 
a filling, home-cooked meal at 
a low price, and still avoid the 
hassles of cooking and cleaning 
up. 

As you walk down Prince George 
Street, the lighted window and 
friendly, personal atmosphere of 
George's makes you quicken your 
pace. On entering the restaur- 
ant your nostrils are tantalized 
by the familiar smells of George's 
home cooking — fried chicken, 
fish, chopped beef — and your 



******************* 

ears are assailed by Mary's fa- 
miliar voice advising a cus- 
tomer to "taste your beans." 
You feel right at home in Georges 
small, personal atmosphere; no 
slick interiors or ultra-mo- 
dern designs exist here. It is 
just a small, local restaurant, 
run by local people for local 
people. And it is a place to 
get a good meal at a reasonable 
cost. For the William and Mary 
student, George's is almost like 
going "home" for dinner. With 
George's, the student is in good 
hands. 

A SMILE FROM MARY is a prestigious 
acquisition for any W&M student. 



$^ 


III 


I^EJSiuS^ 




IMIfilll^filMBIfiBliik**.: '^' 


^^■Bp" 




w^ /i 




/ V 



1 



****************** 



*********** 



****************** 



344/Seniors 



GEORGE'S 



*************** 



******* 




******** 







.#/J-.^W^ Mil 



M 




SB 



******** 






WILLIAMS, ARTIS EARL, Petersburg. 

Biology /French. BSO, International Circle; 

Ebony Expressions; President's Aide; 

Financial Aid and Placement Committee; 

Educational Policy Committee. 
WILLIAMS. JULIE" ELIZABETH, Woodford. 

Psvchology/Sociologv. Sociology Club; 

Alpha Kappa Delta;"BSO; Psychology Club. 
WILLIAMS, KAREN ANITA, "Midlothian. 

Psychology. WMCF; Navigators. 
WILLIAMSON, KAREN JAYNE, Lexington. 

Biology. 



WILSON, BEVERLEY KAY, Richmond. 

History. Kappa Alpha Theta, Mar- 
shal; Queen's Guard. 
WILSON, DEAN ENSOR, Dayton. Sociology/ 

Psychology. Sociology Club; Intra- 

murals. 
WILSON, RALPH WELTON, Williamsburg. 

Biology. Wrestling; Biology Club, 

President, Vice President. 
WOLFORD, CATHY, Kirkwood, MO. 

Economics/Government. OA; RA; Alpha 

Chi Omega, Scholarship Chairman; 

German House, Treasurer; Mortar Board; 

AFS, President. 



WONG, SUSANA LEE, Hampton. Biology. 
International Circle; Circle K; Bio- 
logy Club. 

WOOD, PIA CHRISTINA, Charlottes- 
yille. Economics/French. Hockey; French 
House; Spanish House. 

WOOLDRIDGE, PETER WILLIAM, Lynch- 
burg. Psychology /English. 

WRIGHT, JEFF CORNELL, Alexandria. 
Economics. Phi Kappa Tau, Treasurer, 
Vice President, Executive Council; 
Intramurals; IFC. 



WRIGHT, MARY ANN, Stafford. Math- 

matics/Computer Science. Band; 

WRA; Dorm Council, President; Varsity 

Track; Wesley Foundation; OA; Flat 

Hat: Alpha Lambda Delta; Intramurals. 
WRIGHT, SUSAN K., Princeton, NJ. 

Physical Education. Field Hockey; Lacrosse; 

Intramurals; RA; Head Resident; 

Chi Omega. 
YAMAGUCHI, HIDEKO, Kearny, NJ. 

Physical Education. Lacrosse, Manager; 

Hockey; Intramurals; WRA; Gamma 

Phi Beta. 

YANKOVICH, KATHY LYNN, Williams- 
burg. Elementary Education. Delta 
Delta Delta; Lacrosse; Chorus; Intramurals; 
Student Education Association; Adult 
Skills Program. 

YATES, KATHLEEN ELIZABETH, 
Roanoke. Elementary Education. Band; 
Kappa Delta, Efficiency Chairman, 
Assistant Pledge Trainer. 

YOWELL, EMILY ELIZABETH, Bealeton. 
Biology/Environmental Studies. 
Gamma Phi Beta, Chapter Development, 
Rush Counselor; OA; Evensong; Cho- 
rus; ROTC; Colonial Echo. Co-Editor 
Classes; Lacrosse. 

ZAMORA, ROSANNA EMELIA, San 

Salvador, El Salvador. Biology/Psychology. 

Volleyball; Intramurals. 
ZETTLER, JOHN F.. Simpsonville, SC. 

Business Management. Lambda Chi 

Alpha; Intramurals. 
ZOEBELEIN, DAVID ANDREW, Fairfax. 

History. Theta Delta Chi. 



Seniors/345 




346AJnderclassmen 




ty\ 



Although seniors were in the 
limelight most of the time, 
underclassmen were there to sup- 
port and sometimes do the "dirty 
work." Freshmen and sophomores 
were essential if student pub- 
lications, organizations, and 
sports were to keep going, and 
juniors were there to learn and 
take over the roles of leader- 
ship. Without the enthusiasm of 
freshmen and sophomores, stu- 
dent organizations and activities 
could not stay alive. They would 
slowly disappear. And without 
juniors, there would be no fu- 
ture leaders. 

What were some of the specific 
contributions made by underclass- 
men? They were committee mem- 
bers, publication staff writers, 
and community volunteers. They 
also worked at the Caf, sold 
raffle tickets, and worked on 
theater productions. Whatever 
needed to be done, chances 
were underclassmen were there 
to do it. 

FOOTBALL GAMES bring a wide variety of 
people together. 



Underclassmen/.347 



♦ •♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦».Af»» 



*¥■*¥■¥-¥ 



♦ ♦»*♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦< 



ADZEMOVIC, RADIVOJE, New York, 

NY. 
AILSWORTH, KAREN, Traverse, MI. 
ALDRICH, MARY, Dennis, MA. 
AMES, MATTHEW, Herndon. 
ANDERSON, BRICE, Portsmouth. 
ANDERSON, CELIA, Cheraw, SC. 



ANDERSON, LINDA, Springfield. 
ANDERSON, SHERYL, Springfield. 
ANDERSON, STEPHEN, Towson, MD. 
ANDREWS, ELEANOR, Arlington. 
ANDREWS, RICHARD, Richmond. 
ANGLE, KATHRYN, Beaver Falls, 
PA. 



ANTINORI, KATHY, Williamsburg. 
ARANGO, IGNACIO, Falls Church. 
ARMSTRONG, CHRISTOPHER, Will- 
iamsburg. 
ASHWORTH, CAROL, Richmond. 
ASTIN, DOLLY, Danville. 
BAILEY, ROBERT, Lynchburg. 



BANKS, SARAH, Falls Church. 
BARNES, BETH, Alexandria. 
HARNETT, WILLL\M, Blacksburg. 
BARRETT, VALERIE, Alexandria. 
BARTLETT, DONALD, Fairfax. 
BASNEY, BARBARA, Cherry Hill, 
NJ. 



***♦*■»** 



A junior Elementary Edu- 
cation major from York- 
town, Elizabeth Sim transferred 
to W&M as a sophomore from 
Appalachian State University in 
Boone, North Carolina. Dis- 
cussing the academic atmosphere 
of W&M, Elizabeth commented, 
"I find academics here more 
competitive and good grades 
harder to come by here than at 
ASU. Most of my classes have 
been challenging and have kept 
me busy. Personally, I find 
the overall academic atmosphere 
very fair." 

In Elizabeth's opinion, the 
Honor Code and the self-deter- 
mination policy were assets for 
W&M. She explained, "The 
freedom of choice that the self- 
determination system offers has 
helped me set my own personal 
standards, made me feel respon- 
sible for my actions, and in- 
creased my awareness of the 
needs of my fellow students." 
A member of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma sorority, Elizabeth has 
been an Orientation Aide, a 
dorm council member, and 
secretary of the Panhel pledge 




****** 



***** 



********** 



******** 



******* 



committee. She stated that she 
feels she hasn't yet taken full 
advantage of all that the 
College has to offer in regard 
to outside activities, and 
that she hopes to become more 
involved. She enjoyed the 
social life here, finding it 
different from other schools 
in that she felt little social 
pressure. "There's always 
something going on if I feel 
like going out, but I never 
feel uncomfortable staying in 
on a weekend to study," she 
added. 

Elizabeth particularly liked 
the colonial setting of the 
College, and the students. She 
concluded, "My favorite part 
of W&M is the people. I've 
found the students to be gen- 
uine, down-to-earth, and happy 
to be here. It surely is 
wonderful to attend a school 
where the students are proud 
of their school and its tra- 
ditions." 

ELIZABETH SIM finds the academics chal- 
lenging and students "genuine" here at W&M. 




****** 



******* 



******* 



******** 



348/Juniors 



JUNIOR PROFILE 



**************** 










i^fe^yi 





BATES, JEFFREY, Vienna. 
BEAHM, LINDA, Alexandria. 
BECK, LINDA, Covesville. 
BECKER, ROSS, Gloucester Point, 
BELL, EMILY, Montgomery, AL. 
BELLAMY, LISA, Springfield. 



BENEDICT, MITCHELL, Falls 
Church. 

BENHAM, ROBIN, Virginia Beach. 

BENNETT, DEBORAH, Springfield. 

BETTENDORF, VALERIE, Win- 
chester. 

BETZ, GEORGE, Denver, CO, 

BIERI, SUSAN, Grafton. 



BIRCH, PATTI, Fairfax. 
BIRD, MELISSA, Blacksburg. 
BLACKWELL, ANNA, Wicomico 

Church. 
BLOOD, PETER, Arlington. 
BLOSSER, TAMARA, Norwalk, CT. 
BOLICK, ANITA, Fredericksburg, 



BOLLING, ANNE, Bedford. 
BOSS, MARY, Cheriton. 
BOWEN, DONALD, Ho-Ho-Kus, N.J. 
BOWERS, KATHARINE, King 

William. 
BOYD, JANET, Arlington. 
BOYD, MARY, Virginia Beach. 



BOYD, VINCENT, Charlottesville. 
BRADLEY, JEAN, Powhatan. 
BRADSHAW, STEPHEN, Hampton. 



BRAEDEN, THERESA, Poquoson. 
BRAND, DEBORAH, Alexandria. 
BRANDT, ANN, Haddonfield. N.J. 



BRISSETTE, KAREN, Valparaiso, ID. 
BROWN, KATHLEEN, Springfield. 
BROWN, KENT, Richmond. 



BROWN, LESLEY, Williamsburg. 
BROWN, LORI, Alexandria. 
BROWN, RUSSELL, Warsaw. 



BRYSON, ELIZABETH, Richmond. 
BUCKNER, JULIE, Reston. 
BUEHLER, WENDY, Waynesboro. 



******************* 



Juniors/349 



>♦♦♦♦♦ 



♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 



♦ »♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦» 



ACCENTS BY 



****** 



* * * * * 



BURKE, KATHLEEN, Westport, CT. 
CALLAHAN, PATRICK, Harrison- 
burg. 
CALLISON, SUSAN, Greenville. 



CAMPBELL, CLAIRE, ViUanova, PA. 
CAMPBELL, TODD, Edgewater 

Park, NJ. 
CARRAZZONE, PAUL, Wayne, PA. 



CARRINGTON, DOLORES, Ports- 
mouth. 
CARTER, MARK, Waynesboro. 
CARTER, TIMOTHY, Annandale. 



CARVER, WANDA. Charlottesville. 
CASEY, SUSAN, Springfield. 
CATOE, STEPHANIE, Virginia 
Beach. 



CHAMBLEE, LINDSEY, Aulander, 

NC. 
CHEN, ANGELA, Milford, DE. 
CHILDS, WILLIAM, McLean. 



CHOE, KWANG, Seoul, Korea. 
CHRISTENSEN, CAROL, Holliston, 

MA. 
CICILA, GEORGE, Linden, NJ. 
CLEARY, SUSAN, Falls Church. 
CLEMENS, CLAYTON, Salt Lake 

City, UT. 
CLINE, MICHAEL, Lynchburg. 



CLORE, K. ALAN, Shelbyville, 

KY. 
COCKRELL, SUSAN, Virginia 

Beach. 
COE, TERRELL, McLean. 
COFFMAN, SUZANNE, Springfield. 
COHAN, CELIA, Lynchburg. 
COHEN, LEAH, Arlington. 



CONNELL, ELIZABETH, McLean. 
COOLEY, KAREN, Virginia 

Beach. 
CORDDRY, AMY, Virginia 

Beach. 
CORY, SUSAN, Roanoke. 
COTTRELL, MARY, Toano. 
COUTURE, DAVID, Ozena. FL. 



CREASEY, CECIL, Richmond. 
CREEKMORE, KAREN, Arlington. 
CUPERY, RUTH, Wilmington, DE. 
CUSTIS, CYNTHIA, Craddockville. 
DALTON, ANN, Suffolk. 
DAVOLI, CECILL\, Vienna. 




350/Juniors 



EISEL 



********* 



******* 



******************* 



************** 



******************************** 



* * * * 




Nestled quietly on a back 
street behind sorority 
court is a small ship whose 
local word of mouth publicity 
has made it a popular haven 
for many distraught gift- 
givers since its' opening a 
year ago. The exotic and 
unique nature of Accents' 
array of merchandise is her- 
alded by the tall, whimsical- 
ly decorated giraffe acting 
as a doorman; inside is a 
wide variety of unusual items 
designed to appeal to the 
discriminating customer who 
insists on something out of 
the ordinary. Accents fea- 
tures such original gifts as 
ornate jewelry boxes, hand- 
painted china, distinctive 
kitchen accoutrements, de- 
signer fabrics and pillows; 
amusing items like stuffed 
animals and even "flasher" 
dolls. The warm atmosphere 
of Accents encourages lei- 
surely and enjoyable browsing 
which inevitably turns up 
the perfect gift. 

ANN GORDON examines some of the 
interesting items to be found in 
Accents. 



I* ***♦*««««*•*********•*********«*** 



*********** 



******** 




DEANE, ALEXANDRA, McLean. 
DENNETT. MARK, Atlanta, GA. 
DERVISHIAN. VICTORIA. Richmond. 
DEVORE, MARY, Arlington. 
DIAKUN, RICHARD, Williamsburg. 
DICKENS, ALLEYNE, Danville. 



DICKSON, JOHN, Richmond. 
DIETERLE, MARK, Millersville, 

PA. 
DISE. CAROL, Vienna. 
DOBBS. KATHRYN, Edinburgh, 

Scotland. 
DODD, DIANN, Richmond. 
DODSON. WILLIAM, Bassett. 



DOGGETT, SUZANNE, Charlottes- 
ville. 

DONAHUE, JOHN, Pleasantville. 
NY. 

DOUGHERTY, DONNA, Newport News. 

DOWD, TIMOTHY, Glen Head, NY. 

DRIJACA. DANIEL, Hales Corners, 
WI. 

DUBEL, JOHN, Lincroft, NJ. 

DUNN, JOHN, Arlington. 
DURRETT, JOSEPH. Richmond. 
DYER, DANA, Arlington. 
DYKSTRA. CRAIG, Fairfax. 
EANES, TRACY, Virginia 

Beach. 
EFFORD, WANDA, Virginia 

Beach. 



Juniors/351 



*1t******* 



****************** 



***** 



******* 



SAY 



ELDRIDGE, DENISE, Springfield, 
ESTIS, MONTY, Newtown Square, 

PA. 
EVERLY, KRISTEN, Alexandria. 
FARRAND, WILLIAM, McLean. 
FERNANDEZ, MARIA, Guaynabo, 

FISHER, LAURA, Chagrin, OH. 



FOODY, ELLEN, Coraopolis, PA. 

FORD, SARA, Stratford-upon- 
Avon, U.K. 

FOX, CAROLYN, Springfield. 

FRANKS, BRENDA, Dahlgren. 

FRIEDFELD, LAUREN, South 
Orange, NJ. 

FRITZ, KARRI, Hales Corners, 
WI. 

FRONCZAK, GREGORY, Springfield, 
FULCHER, THOMAS, Falls Church. 
GAILLIOT, CECILIA, Alexandria. 
GALVIS, SERGIO, Houston, TX. 
GATELY, CATHERINE, Arlington. 
GAUDIAN, ROBERT, Springfield. 



GAUT, JAMES, Fairfax. 
GEORGE, DENISE, Alexandria. 
GHOLSTON, SUSAN, Dinwiddle. 
GILES, KENT, York, PA. 
GLEESON, THOMAS, Bermuda. 
GOODRICH, MICHAEL, Milledge- 
ville, GA. 



******* 



******* 



************************* 



DO you remember seeing 
that guy walk by your 
window in coat, vest and tie — 
and gym shorts? He wasn't 
schizophrenic, it was just 
that time of year again. The 
professional photographers of 
Stevens Studios, Bangor, Maine, 
were back on campus, busily 
preserving for posterity's 
sake the images of W&M stu- 
dents, at least from the 
waist up. 

So you dutifully trudged 
over to the Echo office where 
two first-rate photographers 
captured your gorgeous smile 
for the yearbook, and for 
your mother to show off with 
pride. It took only minutes, 
and when your proofs arrived 
just days later, you knew it 
had been worth it. The only 
problem now was deciding which 
shot of your pretty face was 
best, and how many copies to 
order. Amazing; Stevens 
Studios had made your photos 
appear almost as beautiful as 
you really are. 

THE FRIENDLY PHOTOGRAPHERS 
of Stevens Studios produce top- 
quality portraits. 




**************** 



************ 



******* 



352/Juniors 



44 



99 



CHEESE ! 



****** 



*************** 




1 ikJ^J:;! 







CORNET, ANNE, St. Louis, MO. 
GRAHAM, KATHRYN, Richmond. 
GRANT, TERESA, Stephens Citv. 
GRAYSON, WILLIAM, Wavne, PA. 
GREEN, ROBERT, Kearnv, NJ. 
GREENEISEN, LEE, Falls Church. 



GROOVER, DONNA, Alexandria, 
HARM, ESTHER, Seoul. Korea. 
HAMILTON, PIXIE, Paoli, PA. 
HAMLETT, KIM, Gretna. 
HANCOCK, DAVID, Green Bay, WI. 
HARALSON, EDMUND, Fairfax, 



HARLOW, JILL, Colts Neck, NJ. 
HAROLD, ROSEMARY, Rockford, IL. 
HARRIS, BARBARA, Virginia 

Beach. 
HARRIS, GREGORY, Fairfax. 
HARRIS, RHONDA, Virginia 

Beach. 
HARTLEY, CYNTHIA, Stafford. 



HARTSOG, CATHERINE, Hockessin, 

DE. 
HARVEY, VIRGINIA, Salem. 
HASSELL, JOHN, Gloucester. 
HATRAK, BRUCE, Point Pleasant 

Beach, NJ. 
HAUGH, NATALIE, Annandale. 
HAYNES, STAN, Danville. 



HEATH, BARBARA, Williamsburg. 
HENLEY, GINETTE, Oakton. 
HERKNESS, DIANE, Broomall, PA. 



HILL, DEBORAH, Cherry Hill, NJ. 
HILLDRUP, LEE, Richmond. 
HILLIKER, ALAN, Buffalo, NY. 



HILSEE, ELAINE, Rockville, MD. 
HILTON, CAROL, Arlington. 
HOECHNER, CAROL, Nutley, NJ. 



HOFFMAN, JOSEPHINE, Fayette- 

viUe, NC. 
HOGGE, LEWIS, Newport News. 
HOLCOMB, PHYLLIS, Richmond. 



HOLLADAY, GARY, Selinsgrove, 

PA. 
HOLLAR, DONNA, Portsmouth. 
HOLMGREN, JOHN, Richmond. 



• ****• 



Juniors/353 



♦ ♦**»» 



»»♦♦»♦♦♦* 



* » » ♦ » 



♦ ♦»*♦»»■♦♦»»»•» 



***************** 

Only one sandwich is a 
meal in itself, a sand- 
wich from the College Deli. 
Located on both Prince George 
Street and Richmond Road, the 
College Deli offers the student 
big, hot, satisfying, "one- 
meal" sandwiches that will drive 
any student's hunger away. The 
problem on entering the College 
Deli is deciding which of the 
many selections to buy. 

Sandwiches are not the only 
choices offered, however. There 
is also spaghetti, pizza, ham- 
burgers, or seafood to tempt 
the palate. And, the College 
Deli has a wide selection of 
beer, wine, soft drinks, and 
chips for those late night 
munchies or that last minute 
party. 

The College Deli is the place 
to go next time hunger hits. 
There, the student will find 
tempting food and drink to 
chase that hunger away. 

DEBBIE ILGENFRITZ finds that the 
College Deli provides a quick and 
satisfying meal. 




* * * * 



******* 



******** 



***** 



*************************** 



HOLT, AMY, Richmond. 
HOLTZCLAW, SHERYL, Alexandria. 
HOOVER, GARY, Alexandria. 
HOSLER, BARBARA, Mechanicsburg, 

PA. 
HOUCK, MARGARET, Falls Church. 
HOWARD, JUDITH, Richmond. 



HOWARD, SUSAN, McMurray, PA. 
HOYT, ANN, Arlington. 
HUGHES, STEPHANIE, Reston. 
HUMPHRIES, CAROL, Arlington. 
HUNT, RICHARD, Paeonian 

Springs. 
HURST, RICK, Newport News. 



HYMES, DEBORAH, Ridgewood, NJ. 
INSERRA, PAMELA, Fairfax. 
ISAACS, STAGEY, Vienna. 
JACKSON, BARBARA, Roanoke. 
JENKINS, PAMELA, Atlanta, GA. 
JEWELL, DEBRA, Chesapeake. 



JOHANN, CORNELIA, West Chester, 

PA. 
JOHNSON, DAVID, Vienna. 
JOHNSON, KATHLEEN, Vienna. 
JOHNSON, MELINDA, Richmond. 
JONES, DONALD, Lvnchburg. 
JONES, KATHLEEN, Rumson, NJ. 




354/Juniors 



COLLEGE DELI 



****************** 




******-k-t,1,1,i,1,i,i,ir*i,i,****i,1,ir**** 



JONES. LINDA, Richmond. 
JONES. STEPHANIE. Venetia. PA. 
JUNGHANS, LIDA. Athens, Greece. 



KANIA, JANETTE, Springfield. 

KAUT. JONATHAN, Charlottes- 
ville. 

KAUZLARICH, SUSAN, Charlottes- 
ville. 



KELLER. NANCY. Winchester, PA. 
KELLOGG. Patricia. Westfield, 

NJ. 
KENNEDY, MICHELE, Vienna. 



KENT. ANDREA. Lewisburg, PA. 
KEPCHAR. BARBARA. Danville. 
KILGORE, PHILLIP, Greenville, 
SC. 



KIMBROUGH, DORIS, Atlanta, GA. 
KIRBY, VIRGINIA. Virginia 

Beach. 
KIRKPATRICK. DOUGLAS. Fairfax. 



KITCHEN, ALLAN, Norfolk. 
KITCHEN. DAVID, Pittsford, NY. 
KNALTER, PATRICK, Virginia 

Beach. 
KNEUPER. RAYNA, Burke. 
KOLANTIS. IRENE, Virginia 

Beach. 
KOMITOR, JEFFREY, Annandale. 



KOURY, BARBARA, Fairfax. 
KRAUS. DEANNA. Virginia 

Beach. 
KUHFUSS. GAIL. Kingsport. TN. 
KUNZ, HEIDI, Parma Heights, OH. 
KURTZ. CHRISTINE, St. Charles, MO. 
LARKIN, MAUREEN. Richmond. 



LARl'E. SHAWN. MiUboro. 
LASSITER. MARK, Danville. 
LAWLER. LISE. Larchmont. NY. 
LAYMAN. NANCY. Bedford. 
LEAF. BARBARA. Kirtland. NM. 
LEARDO. RICHARD. Belleville. 
NJ. 



LEMON. BONNIE. Fairfax Station. 
LEWIS. LORI. Cortland. NY. 
LIEDER, LYNN. Perrvsburg, OH. 
LINDEMANN. GRETHE. Norfolk. 
LIPFORD, CARLA, Concord. 
LISTROM. JANINE. Richmond. 



Juniors/.355 



******** 



JUNIOR PROFILE 



************** 



*********** 



LITMAN, DIANE, Rockville, MD. 
LITTAUER, DWAYNE, Birmingham, 

AL, 
LOPDRUP, KIM, Florence, SC. 



LOWRY, JO, Richmond. 
LUCAS, DAVTD, Somerville, NJ. 
LUCAS, JEFFREY, Springfield. 



LUCRE, MARY, Alexandria. 
LULL, JEANNE, Annandale. 
LUNDAHL, WALTER, Huntington 
Station, NY. 



LUNNY, PAMELA, Redding, CT. 
LYNCH, DAVID, Richmond. 
LYNCH, ROSE, Chester. 



MACEK, PAUL, Springfield. 
MAC GOWAN, CATHERINE, Falls 

Church. 
MADANCY, JOYCE, Annandale. 



MAGEE, MARY, Roanoke. 
MARLING, DEBORAH, Vienna. 
MARLING, ELISABETH, Vienna. 
MATTSON, PAMELA, Falls Church. 
MAYS, BENJAMIN, Springfield. 
MC BRIDE, JENNIFER, Rocky Mount, 



MC COLLUM, DONNA, Plattsburgh, 

NY. 
MC COY, JOHN, Largo, FL. 
MC CRACKEN, LOIS, Denver, CO. 
MC CULLA, WILLIAM, Alexandria. 
MC DANIEL, SARAH, Rocky Mount. 
MC EACHRAN, DANIEL, Riverside, 

IL. 



MC ENROE, ANN, Hagerstown. MD. 
MC GIBBON, PATRICK, Fairfax. 
MC INERNEY, SUSAN, Jacksonville, 

FL. 
MC INTIRE, PAMELA, Columbia, MD. 
MC LANE, MICHAEL, Annandale. 
MC LEOD, EDWARD, Virginia 

Beach. 



MC MENAMIN, CATHERINE, Hartwood. 

MEACHUM, SUSAN, Washington, DC. 

MEADOR, KATHY, Richmond. 

MEANS, KEVIN, Vienna. 

MELLOTT, DEBORAH, Pittsburgh, 
PA. 

MERCHENT, ELIZABETH, Fredericks- 
burg. 




356/Juniors 



***** 



• ♦»♦♦♦« 



***** 




I t's going along great 
M. this year — it puts a 
strain on my academics," ex- 
claimed junior Stephen Ruff 
in response to an inquiry 
about his social life. Steve 
grabbed every free moment 
possible to attend to his 
personal pleasures here, such 
as seeing concerts and partici- 
pating in intramural volley- 
ball, and so keeping studying 
to a "bare minimum." Formerly 
from Alexandria, he spent his 
Christmas and summer breaks at 
his present home in Hawaii, a 
more appropriate location for 
pursuing his favorite activity, 
surfing, along with sailing and 
"lots of waves and bikinis." 

Coming back to his home here 
at W&M, Steve lived for the 
second year at the French House. 
"It's like a family, almost a 
fraternal relationship. You're 
able to see everyone all the 
time, and there's always our 
good reputation for parties." 
As for future goals, Steve 
leaned towards completing an 
economics major, and possibly 
declaring French as well. 



* * * * 



MERCREADY, MARK, Vienna. 
MERRITT, SUSAN. Hampton. 
MERRY, DIANE, North Hills, PA. 
MEYER, CARL, Seminole, FL. 
MEYER, SHERYL, Annandale. 
MILES, JOAN, Jackson Heights, 
NY. 



MILLER. ELIZABETH. Fredericks- 
burg. 
MILLER. TIMOTHY. Chesapeake. 
MIMS, VALERIE, Springfield. 
MITCHELL, DEBRA, Fairfax. 
MOORE, JULIE, Oxon Hill. MD. 
MORELAND, EDWARD, Springfield. 



MORRIS, CAROL, Waterburv, CT. 
MORRIS, .JAY. Petersburg. 
MORRIS. THOMAS. Whippanv, NJ. 
MOZINGO, LOUISE, Arlington. 
MURRAY, PATTI, Langlev. 
MUSCARELLA, MICHAEL, Chesa- 
peake. 



MYERS, MICHAEL. Portsmouth. 
NAFZINGER. NANCY. Fairfax. 
NASH, LYNN, Fairfax. 
NEWBERRY. KAREN, Charlottes- 
ville. 
NEWMAN, GRAY, Norfolk. 
NICHOLS, BARBARA, Richmond. 



Juniors/.357 



*••••***** 



********* 



****** 



SUTTLE'S 



************************ 



Sometimes the best gifts 
come in the smallest 
packages. Such is the case 
with a gift from Suttle's 
Jewelers. When you receive 
a gift from Suttle's, you 
open the package with ex- 
citement and anticipation, 
because you can be assured 
that it will appeal to you. 

Suttle's appeals to the 
College student for a number 
of reasons. For one, it is 
located on Prince George 
Street, within easy access 
of the William and Mary 
campus. Furthermore, the 
atmosphere is friendly and 
relaxed, unlike many jewelry 
stores. Also, Suttle's 
carries a wide variety of 
jewelry popular to sorority 
and fraternity members — 
lavalieres, office dangles, 
recognition pins, and chapter 
guards. But most important, 
Suttle's keeps the William 
and Mary student in mind with 
its reasonable prices. 

THE PERFECT RING for Nancy Nielsen is 
discovered at Suttle's Jewelers. 



******* 




****** 



********************* 



********************■***********<!" 



NIEBURG, DINAH, Arlington. 
NISKA, LUCILLE, Vienna. 
O'HANLON, JOHN, Fairfax. 
OKINAKA. NAOMI, Madison, NJ. 
OLEYNIK, JEFFREY, Richmond. 
O'LOUGHLIN, SUSAN, Rockville, 
MD. 



ORDWAY, ALIETTE, Arlington. 

ORSINI, BARBARA, Manassas. 

OVERBEY, TERRY, Richmond. 

OVERBY, KATHLEEN, Fredericks- 
burg. 

PARRISH, JUDITH, Newport News. 

PATTERSON, BRUCE, Royal Oak, 
MI. 



PATTERSON, GERALD, Clarksville, 

IN. 
PAZOGA, PATRICIA, Oradell, NJ. 
PEAKE, DWIGHT, Wise. 
PEARSON, KATHERINE, Richmond. 
PENNIX, JAMES, Newark, NJ. 
PETERSEN, ERICA, EUicott City, 

MD. 



PEYTON, SARAH, Arlington. 
PFANZ, DONALD, Rockville, MD. 
PHILIPP, WALTER, Bischberg. 
POBINER, BONNIE, Princeton, NJ. 
POLAND, KIMBERLY, Alexandria. 
POMMERENING, WILLIAM, McLean. 



358/Juniors 




SJ^ik^^^ 



JEWELERS 



***************** 



******* 



******* 










4^^i 




PONTICELLO, STACEY, Bavonne, 

NJ. 
PORTER, SUSAN, Glen Allen. 
POTORTI, STEPHEN, Williamsburg. 



PROCK, SUSAN, Needham, MA. 
PRZYPYSZNY, KAREN, Chicago, IL. 
QUATTLEBAUM, MARY, King George. 



QUICK, AURELIA, Lvnchburg. 
QUINN, JEFFREY, Gaithersburg, 

MD. 
RAPPE, SUSAN, Fairview, PA. 



RARIG, NATALIE, Mukilteo, WA. 
REAGAN, JAMES, Reston. 
REED, DEBORAH, Randallstown, 
MD. 



REED, MARK, Lurav. 
REEVES, BRENDA, Roanoke. 
REEVES, TRUDY, Lexington. 



RESTUCCIA, AMY, Lynchburg. 
RHODES, DIANA, Lynchburg. 
RL^iNCHO, MARILYN, Guaynabo, 

P.R. 
RICCA, DAVID, Williamsville, 

NY. 
RICHARDSON, LINDA, Norfolk. 
RICKERICH, ANN, Arlington. 



RIDDLE, REBECCA, South Boston. 
RIVES, LINDA, Arlington. 
ROACH, BRETT, Roanoke. 
ROBERSON, SANDY, Salem. 
ROBINS, CHRISTOPHER, Clifton. 
ROBINSON, RETA, Belle Haven. 



RODGERS, HELEN, Shipman. 
ROMAN, ROBERT, Vienna. 
ROSS, CAROLYN, Timonium, MD. 
ROY, ANITA, West Point. 
RUFF, STEPHEN, Honolulu, HI. 
RUSEVLYAN, ANDREW, Arlington. 



RUSSELL, BRIDGETT, Rockville, 

MD. 
RUSSELL, MARK, Arlington. 
SACCONE, MICHAEL, Scott, IL. 
SACKS, DAVID, Hampton. 
SAGOLLA, LISA, Penndel, PA. 
SAIS, JOSEPHINE, Richmond. 



Juniors/359 



STILL GOING STRONG 



******** 



SAMUELS, CYNTHIA, Gainesville, 

FL. 
SANFORD, MARY, Warsaw. 
SARDO, LAURA, Camp Lejeune, NC. 
SAUNDERS, MARGARET, Virginia 

SAUTTER, JULIE, Middletown, NJ. 
SCHAFFER, DAVID, Burke. 



SCHMIDT, DAVID, Arlington. 

SCHRIEFER, JANET, Virginia 
Beach. 

SCHUETTE, ELIZABETH, Alex- 
andria. 

SCOTT, ELIZABETH, Lexington. 

SCOTT, LAINE, Mobile, AL. 

SCOTT, TAMMY, McLean. 



SCOTT, WILLIAM, Arlington. 
SEABORN, DORIS, Southampton Co. 
SECOR, JULIE, Alexandria. 
SEDWICK, MARTHA, Charlottes- 
ville. 
SEIDEL, CYNTHIA, Ocean City, NJ. 
SHAARA, LILA, Tallahassee, FL. 



SHANNON, CAROL, Houston, TX. 
SHARMAN, CHARLES, Richmond. 
SHERLAND, SUSAN, Richmond. 
SHIELDS, JAMES, Rockville 

Centre, NY. 
SHINE, MARGARET, Portsmouth. 
SHORT, DEAN, Newport News. 



SILER, LINDA, Washington, DC. 
SIM, ELIZABETH, Yorktown. 
SIMMONS, NANNETTE, Annandale. 
SIMPSON, STEPHEN, Alexandria. 
SKOVRAN, NINA, Trumbull, CT. 
SLATER, DOUGLAS, Meadville, PA 



SLATER, SUSAN, Lexington. 
SLAYTON, REBECCA, Farmville. 
SLOMINSKI, CHRISTOPHER, 

Williamsburg. 
SMITH, KATHRYN, Rocky Mount. 
SMITH, SHERYL, Colonial Heights. 
SMITH, STEVEN, Blacksburg. 



SMITH, TERESA, Colonial Heights. 
SNELLINGS, KIMBERLY, Richmond. 
SNIDER, DEBORAH, Charlottesville. 
SNIDOW, PAMELA, Lynchburg. 
SNYDER, BRETT, Chesterfield, MO. 
SOLES, LINDA, Dutton. 



SOWELL, MARY, Georgetown, SC. 
SPIVEY, CAROL, Bon Air. 
STAGNARO, LYN, Alexandria. 
STEGALL, PAMELA, Martinsville. 
STEPHENS, SUZANNE, Triangle. 
STEPHENSON, TRACEY, Temple 
Hills, MD. 



STEVENSON, KATHRYN, Richmond. 
STIPP, KAREN, Midway, KY. 
STOLCIS, JEANNE, Alexandria. 
STORM, RANDLE, Media, PA, 
STOUFFER, JAN, Ithaca, NY. 
STUNTZ, WILLIAM, Annapolis, MD. 









360/Juniors 




******* 



^A-M 



****************************************** 



SULLIVAN, KEITH, McLean. 
SYKES, GRAHAM, Scarborough, 

Toronto, Canada. 
TAMMI, NANCY, Mavwood, NJ. 
TAYLOR, AMY, Springfield. 
TAYLOR, BETSY, Richmond. 
TERRANOVA, BETH, Newport News. 




The College can boast that 
it has the oldest aca- 
demic building in continuous 
use in the United States — the 
Sir Christopher Wren Building. 
Construction of the building, 
which has been designated a 
National Historic Landmark, 
was begun in 1695. At the 
present, the building houses 
English classrooms and offices 
of some of the department's 
staff. 

Wren, the major tourist 
attraction on campus, was the 
site of many special activi- 
ties. Sororities like Alpha 
Chi Omega and Kappa Delta held 
special ceremonies in the Great 



Hall. The Wren courtyard 
proved a beautiful setting for 
several large all-college 
gatherings, such as the formal 
opening of Homecoming weekend, 
the Yule Log ceremony at 
Christmas, and the Honors 
Convocation in the spring. 
The front lawn was the scene 
of numerous receptions given 
by the President for freshmen, 
transfers, parents, and alumni. 
Parents' Weekend and Thanks- 
giving were highlighted by 
ecumenical services held in 
Wren Chapel. 

On the second floor, the Wren 
Building houses an art gallerv 
where the portraits of the 



SUSAN AUSTIN views the Wren portrait 
gallery. 

presidents of the College for 
the last three centuries are 
displayed. The gallery looks 
out over the Wren courtyard and, 
on sunny days, it was not un- 
common to see students seated 
on the broad window ledges of 
the gallery, studying and 
enjoying the beautiful weather 
at the same time. Almost three 
hundred years after its con- 
struction, the Wren Building 
was still an integral part 
of W&M life. 



******* 



*********** 



******* 




TERRELL. PHYLLIS, Fredericksburg. 
TERRY. VERONICA, Arlington. 
THAXTON, ROBERT, Lvnchburg. 
THOMSON, MARCY, Howell, NJ. 
TISON, EDWIN, Newport News. 
TJOSSEM, LINDA, Saluda. 



Juniors/361 



****************** 



********* 



****** 



THOSE 



******* 



Looking at your checkbook 
records one time too 
many — it became clear that you 
would have to get . . . yes, a 
JOB! Oh, the thought! Spend- 
ing precious hours shelving 
library books at Swem, wait- 
ing on tables at King's Arms, 
or making phone calls to 
"Campaign for the College." 

But the facts had to be faced, 
so you trudged on over to James 
Blair Hall, dragged yourself up 
three flights of stairs to the 
Office of Financial Aid, and 
entered. Ms. Sprigg was there 
with a cheery smile and you 
were almost glad you had come. 
She directed your attention to 
that magical index card file 
containing job opportunities 
with Williamsburg area em- 
ployers. After exploring 
available campus and community 
jobs, the decision was made and 
you applied. 

When your first paycheck 
arrived, you felt a sense of 
achievement. This might just 
work out after all! Studies 
did not go down the drain over 
night, and social life was not 



totally ruined by holding a 
job. You even found time to 
watch M*A*S*H* or football on 
Monday nights! 

And you had MONEY to spend! 
Even though you only started at 
minimum wage (it's less if you 
worked on campus), at least 
you were able to pay for a piz- 
za at Sal's. And when you 
cashed a check, there was no more 
worrying about it bouncing. Now 
THAT was a sense of security and 
achievement. 

Yes, working was good to you. 
Here was a chance to meet some 
new people, make a little bit of 
money, and do something more 
enjoyable than keeping your nose 
in a book all day. Free time 
was more appreciated. Though 
it was sometimes hard to keep 
up with a busy and hectic sche- 
dule, there was always time to 
do what you really wanted. Yes, 
you had to admit that working 
was an important aspect of the 
life of a "well-rounded student" 
at William and Mary. 

ONE OF THE MANY JOBS held by 
employed students is bouncing. One such 
bouncer is Biff Aiken. 



* * * * 



TODD, ROBERT, Richmond. 
TOLSON, KAREN, Fairfax. 
TOWNSEND, JANET, Richmond. 
TROGDON, DENISE, McLean, 
TRUMBULL, GAY, Vienna. 
TUFTS, ELIZABETH, West Chester, 
PA. 



TURBYFILL, BETH, Lynchburg. 

TURNER, CYNTHU, Virginia 
Beach. 

TURNER, ROBERT, Richmond. 

TYLER. CONNIE, Schuyler. 

URIBE, SARITA, Wynnwood, PA 

VANKIRK, KATHERINE, Chambers- 
burg, PA. 



VAUGHAN, MERLIN, Richmond. 
VEHRS, NANCY, Manassas. 
VELDE. BLAKE, Arlington. 
VERLANDER, ROSEMARY, Weems. 
VILLALBA, WENDY, Cherry Hill, 

NJ. 
WALKER, EDWARD, Newport News. 



WALKER, ELAINE, Arlington. 
WALL, MARGIE. Farmville. 
WALLIS, DONNA, Chesapeake. 
WALTERS, EDWARD. MiUboro. 
WALTON, CLAIRE, Princeton 

Junction, NJ. 
WALTON, ELIZABETH, Hartsdale, 

NY. 



362/Juniors 




A. ***** * 



CHECKBOOK BLUES 

m 



****** 



********** 



: -4 




WARD, PAULA. Richmond. 
WARREN, JEANNE, Manassas. 





■.'■\ 

1 
i 




1 


i^ 


:j^^ 





r I i 



%. 



*********************** 




4. b, 







WARRICK, CECILY, Plymouth, MI. 
WARWICK, BURDETTE, Irvington. 



WATSON, JOHN, Springfield. 
WEDDING. DARYL. St. Petersburg, 
FL. 



WEIRICK, GUNVOR, Springfield. 
WEISER, WILLIAM, Vienna. 



WELCH, CATHERINE, Springfield. 
WELSH, CATHERINE, Hampton. 



WHITE, AUDREY, Lynchburg. 
WHITFIELD, MARY, Gloucester. 
WHITMARSH, LYNNE. Lynchburg. 
WHITNEY. JACKIE, Richmond. 
WHITSON, CHRISTINA. Arlington. 
WIELAND, KATHLEEN, Bloomington, 
IL. 



WIEMANN, CONSTANCE, Manhasset, 

NY. 
WIGGINS, KENT. Colonial Heights. 
WILD. KAREN, Newport News. 
WILL, ALYSON, Vienna. 
WILLIAMS, DAVID, Arlington. 
WILLIAMS, REGINALD. Danville. 



WILLL\MS, RODNEY, Petersburg. 
WILLSON. JANET. Keswick. 
WINE. CYNTHIA. Bridgewater. 
WINN. KENNETH, Virginia Beach. 
WIRSHUP, PHILIP, Richmond. 
WITMER, RACHEL, Lancaster, PA. 



WITT, DAVID, Nellysford. 
WITTEN, MARGARET, Columbia, SC. 
YOUNGER, RENEE. Midlothian. 
ZAPPULLA. MARY ANN, Petersburg. 
ZUPAN, MICHAEL, Johnstown, PA. 
ZVOSEC, CHRISTINE, Lawrenceville, 
NJ. 



Juniors/363 



• »»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»*»»»»»»»4t»»<^»» 



ACKERMAN, NANCY, Ridgefield, CT. 
ADAMS, DEBORAH, Vienna. 
ADAMS, JENNIFER, Richmond. 
ALBERT, SUSAN, Covington. 
ALLEN, ROBERT, Alexandria. 
ALLUISI, JEAN, Virginia Beach. 



ALMY, LAURA, Dedham, MA. 

ANDERSON KATHRYNE, Waynesboro. 

ANZMANN, MARCIA, Reisterstown, 
MD. 

ATKINSON, DEIRDRE, Medford, NJ. 

BAILEY, MARY BETH, Lynchburg. 

BAILEY, ROBERTA, Charlottes- 
ville. 



BARBEE, NANCY, Lorton. 
BARHAM, SAMUEL, Richmond. 
BARRETT, CARTER, Newsoms. 
BARROSSE, COLOMBIA, McLean. 
BAYLIS, JAMIE, Falls Church. 
BEHLMAR, CINDY, Tabb. 



BEIL, CLARK, Fairfax. 
BELL, KATHERINE, Raleigh, NC. 
BELSHA, BETSY, Richmond. 
BENDER, AUDREY, Virginia Beach. 
BENESH, PATTY, Chesterfield. 
BERG, KARIN, Springfield. 



»»»♦♦»»*», ».»^,i,^,^,^^^ 



BERNHARDT, SUSAN, Lexington. 
BERRY, JOHN, Madison. 
BERTOLET, BEVERLY, Abington, PA. 



BESS, KATHY, Covington. 

BEST, LISA, Fairfax. 

BICE, KAREN, Hollidaysburg, PA. 



BINZER, CAROL, Falls Church. 
BLANOCK, LISA, Mathews. 
BLUE, JANA, Williamsburg. 



BODENHEIMER, SUSAN, Riverside, 

CT. 
BOEHLING, JANICE, Richmond 
BOLTE, CAROLINE, DeWitt. 



BOSHEARS, KEVIN, Alexandria. 
BOWEN, SHARON, Warsaw. 
BOWERS, GEORGE, Williamsburg. 




364/Sophomores 



SURVIVORS 



******^,1,^,1^1,^,^,^,^, 



***************** 




BOYLE, MARY BETH, Westfield, 

NJ. 
BRADLEY, FRANCES, Sterling. 
BRADY, JULIE, Annapolis, MD, 
BRAMMER, JANELL, Bassett. 
BRENNAN, MARY, Yonkers, NY. 
BREWER, MICHAEL, Alexandria. 



BRIGGS, NANCY, Franklin. 
BROOKS, MARY-LEE, Falls Church. 
BROSNAHAN, MARGARET, Falls 

Church. 
BROSNAN, MARY, Alexandria. 
BROWN, DAN, Heathsville. 
BROWN, RANDOLPH, South Bend, IN. 



BRUENING, GARY, Richmond. 
BRYAN, WILLIAM, Springfield. 
BRYANT, ANNE-MERLE, Richmond. 
BRYANT, SHARON, Charlottesville. 
BUCHANAN, PATRICIA, Charlottes- 
ville. 
BUCHANAN, STEPHANIE, Springfield, 



BUCKIUS, DEAN, Springfield. 
BURCHER, ANTHONY, Yorktown. 
BURKE, ANN, Leon. 
BURKE, TEMPLE, Warrenton. 
BURLAGE, STEPHEN, Virginia 

Beach. 
BUSH, JANE, Williamsburg. 



BUSSER, MARY SUE, Richmond. 



BUTLER, KENNETH, Falls Church. 



BYER, PAMELA, Covington. 



CAGLEY, LESLIE, Charlottes- 
ville. 



CAMPANA, JEFFREY, Monroe Falls. 
OH. 



*************** 



Sophomores/365 



******* 



SOPHOMORE PROFILE 



CAMPBELL, ELIZABETH, North- 
ridge, CA. 

CAMPBELL, STACEY, Port Republic. 

CARLTON, PATRICE, Richmond. 

CASSON, LESLIE, Easton, MD. 

CHAN, MARY, North Springfield. 

CHAPMAN, CATHERINE, Augusta, 
GA. 



CHAPPELL, KAREN, Emporia. 
CHARLTON, LEISA, Adelphi, MD. 
CHEEK, DAVID, Richmond. 
CHOW, GLEN, McLean. 
CLAGETT, RITA, Annandale. 
CLARKE, JUDITH, Sutherland. 



CLEARY, EILEEN, Arlington. 
CLEM, MICHAEL, WalkersviUe, 

MD. 
COLBY, LINDA, Colonial Beach. 
COLE, CATHERINE, Fairfax. 
COLE, KATHLEEN, Springfield. 
CONNER, SANDRA, Emporia. 



CONTRACTOR, RASHNA, Blacksburg. 
COOK, LORI, Norfolk. 
COOPER, AMY, Mystic, CT. 
COOPER, ANNE, Lake Forest, IL. 
COOPER, JENNIFER, Falls Church. 
CORRELL, STEVEN Ponca City, 
OK. 



COX, SANDRA, Virginia Beach. 
CRANIN, DEBRA, Hartsdale, NY. 
CRATSLEY, JANET, Fairfax. 
CRUZ, MARIE, Norfolk. 
GUMMING, JONATHAN, Bellport, 

NY. 
DAMBEKALNS, LYDIA, TimberviUe. 



DANIEL, KIMBERLY, Richmond. 
DAVIS, CHARLES, Farmville, NC. 
DELACRUZ, SUSAN, Weirton, WV. 
DEMONBREUN, DONNA, Richmond. 
DICKIE, CLAIRE, Tappahannock. 
DIEHL, NANCY HART, Nashville, 
TN. 



DINARDO, JAMES, Virginia Beach. 
DOBBINS, MARK, Christiansburg. 
DOUGHERTY, ROBIN, Annandale. 
DUCKWORTH, CHRISTINA, Mobile, 

AL. 
DUFFY, MICHAEL, Lynbrook, NY. 
DUFFY. PATRICIA, Great Falls. 



EDMONSTON, KATHRYN, Hamilton, 
NY. 

EDWARDS, CATHY, Falmouth. 

EDWARDS, LAURA, Richmond. 

EKLUND, LYNN, Fairfax. 

EMANS, CHARLOTTE, Williams- 
burg. 

EMERY, ROBIN, Hingham, MA. 



ENGLISH, BEVERLY, Manassas. 
ERCEG, ANDREA, Manassas. 
ERWIN, EDWARD, Morganton, NC. 
ESBENSEN, KRISTEN, Fallbrook, 

CA. 
ESTABROOK, DRUCILLA, PorL 

Republic, MD. 
EVANS. JOHN, Vienna. 




i.-^X l'^ 



366/Sophomores 



*********** 



*********** 



********** 



******** 




Wi^'f 



A A \m 



^ ^i 



************************** 

A major reason for William 
and Mary's popularity was 

its academic reputation. Doug 

Wingo, a sophomore from Roanoke, 

Virginia, admitted that this 

reputation was his most pract- 
ical reason for applying here, 

but added that the beauty of 

the campus lured him as well. 
Doug, a potential art history 
i or studio art major, was one 
♦ member of the ranks that chose 
f to live off campus; he shared 

an apartment with two other 

students. Doug found many 

advantages to this mode of 

life and considered the in- 
dependence fun and more con- 
ducive to studying. He did 

admit, however, that apart- 
ment dwellers had "to make a 

special effort to socialize." 
One aspect of William and 

Mary that appealed to Doug was 

the two-faceted social life. 

While the "partier's" social 

life appeared more exciting, 

Doug insisted that the other, 

more quiet style was just as 

rewarding. He found that 

walking down Duke of 

Gloucester Street, "tourist 

watching," seeing a theater 

production, or participating 

as a member and officer in the 

Baptist Student Union was also 

satisfying and entertaining. 

For Doug, William and Mary 

had extended many different 

chances to develop in his 

four years here. 

DOUG WINGO, a probable studio art 
major, mixes business with pleasure. 



************************* 




FAILLACE, FaCHARD, Bethel, CT 
FAKADE.J, MARIA, Morgantown, WV. 
FARANO, ROGER, Virginia Beach. 
FESSENDEN. .JOHN, Annandale. 
FINCH. BRENT, Richmond. 
FINDLAY, MARGARET, Alexandria 



********** 



********** 





FISCHER, SHEILA, Clifton Forge. 
FLETCHER. .JENNIFER, Gate Citv. 
FONES. MICHAEL, Fairfax. 
FORBES, ELIZABETH, Chesapeake. 
FOSTER, LEE ANNE, Virginia 

Beach. 
FREIMUND, JENNIFER. McLean. 



Sophomores/367 



»^l»»»»»»»^l»»»»»»»»»»»4^»^(A»»jf)>»»A>:<^»A^<f»»»»*»»»*»»»»*»»»*»*»*»»»»»»jf^^4i^ 



FRICK, ELIZABETH, Hockessin, 

DE. 
FRIEDHEIM, CYNTHIA, Alexandria. 
FRIEND, PAMELA, Fredericksburg. 
FRYE, CHARLOTTE, Portsmouth. 
FULFORD, DAVID, Vienna. 
GAINES, JOHN, Richmond. 



GARNETTE, CYNTHIA, Roanoke. 
GARRETT, MICHAEL, Lynchburg. 
GAUDLITZ, JANET, Richmond. 
GIBBS, JANIS, Depew, NY. 
GIEDD, ABIGAIL, Williamsburg. 
GOERTZ, JUDITH, Manassas. 




» * * * * 



•c ■» * ♦ ♦ ♦ 



* » • ♦ 



♦ • ♦ ♦ ♦ 



♦ •♦•♦¥♦»» 



» • • ♦ 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦** 




What does Busch Gardens 
mean to William and Mary 
students? For most, it brings 
to mind the Hospitality Center, 
the place where anyone over 
the age of 18 can indulge in 
three free beers on a lazy 
afternoon. Although open 
daily, the Hospitality Center 
draws its largest student 
crowd on Fridays. They come 
alone and in groups to unwind 
after a hard week, socialize 
with friends . . . and drink beer. 
But Busch Gardens is more 



than the free beer at the 
Hospitality Center. Only a 
monorail ride away is a ver- 
itable playground for students 
and tourists alike. With its 
many rides, diverse shops, and 
wide variety of shows, Busch 
Gardens has something for just 
about everyone. For the timid, 
there is the beautiful carousel. 
The ever-popular flume ride 
appeals to those of a more 
adventurous nature. And for 
those of masochistic tenden- 
cies, there is a new addition: 



THE LOCH NESS MONSTER, the newest 
addition to Busch Gardens, is a popular 
attraction for thrill-seekers. 

the Loch Ness Monster. Adver- 
tized as the only double inter- 
locking loop rollercoaster in 
the world, "Nessie" also boasts 
the longest and steepest drop 
of any rollercoaster around. 

So, if you're looking for an 
escape from the dull grind of 
college life, go to Busch 
Gardens, drink your three beers, 
and ride the Loch Ness Monster. 
You might never be the same. 



368/Sophomores 



"NESSIE" 



******** 








^YiMff 



iA4^f 



\ 



************ 



GOFF, TONI, Warrenton. 
GORDON. ANN, South Boston. 
GRAICHEN. MARGARET. Vienna 
GREENE. CONNIE. Martinsville 
GREGG. MARGARET. Potomac MD 
GREGORY, KAREN. Falls Church 



GREIFER. HELEN, Alexandria. 
GROGAN, DAVE, Olmsted Falls, 

OH. 
GROSS. BARBARA. Williamsburg. 
GUY, ALICE, Memphis, TN. 
GWYNN. MATTHEWS, Reston. 
HABERMAN, JOE. Vienna. 



HABICHT. JUDITH, West Seneca, 

NY. 
HAGAN. ANN, Roanoke. 
HAIRSTON. PAMERA. Danville. 
HALL. JAMES. Ashland. 
HALSTEAD. GAIL. McLean. 
HAMBLEY. GWYNETH, Reston. 



HARPER. RHONDA. Fisherville. 
HARRIS. MARSHALL. Freeman. 
HARRIS, NANCY. Chesapeake. 
HARRISON. BETH. Midlothian. 
HARTBERGER, SHARON, Madison 

Heights. 
HARTFIELD, REBECCA, Salem. 



HARTON. SANDRA, Richmond. 
HASSETT, PETER, Setauket, NY. 
HAWK. BEVERLY, Bay Village, OH. 
HELFF. ERIC, Walpole, NH. 
HENNESSY. MARY BETH, Moores- 

town, NJ. 
HENRY. PATRICIA, Stamford, CT. 



HERRMANN. CECILIA. Richmond. 
HETHCOCK. ELIZABETH. High Point, 

NC. 
HICKS. HAL, Virginia Beach. 
HIGGINS, EDITH. Pearisburg. 
HILBRINK, MARK, Fairfax 
HIRSCH, DAVID, Vienna. 



HOLLY, MOIRA, Fairfax. 
HOLMES. CATHERINE. Sydney, 

HOLSINGER, JOHN, Norfolk. 
HOPPER, ELLEN, Delaware, OH. 
HOWARD. WANDA. Pittsburg, PA. 
HOWE, AMANDA, Dearborn, MI. 



HOYT. DAVID, Culpeper. 
HUCUL. TEENA, Jonesville. 
HUK, ROMANA, St. Petersburg. 

FL. 
HUNT. FRANCES, Lorton. 
HUNTLEY, KRISTEN, Danville. 
JACKSON. CECILIA, Richmond. 



JACOBSON. SUSAN, Hemdon. 
JACQUIN. STEPHEN, Peoria, IL. 
JARVIE. LLSA, Springfield. 
JENNINGS. NANCY. Richmond. 
JESTER, DAVID, Chineoteague. 
JOHNSON, JEAN. Salem. 



Sophomores/369 



»»♦♦♦»♦»♦♦»♦♦»»♦♦♦♦»*»*♦♦ 



W&M NEWS 



*********** 



JOLLEY, SUSAN, Wilmington, DE. 
JONES, CAROLINE, Greenwood, SC. 
JONES, CATHERINE, Falls Church. 
JONES, CHARLES, Concord. 
JONES, JOANNE, Bent Mountain. 
JONES, JOYCE, Red Oak. 



JORDAN, CONSTANCE, Chesapeake. 
KARAS, STEPHANIE, Fredericks- 
burg. 
KATZ, BETH, Virginia Beach. 
KEATING, EILEEN, Califon, NJ. 
KEIFER, BRYAN, Vienna 
KENASTON, THOMAS, Annandale. 



KENNELLY, MARY, Arlington. 
KERN, STEPHEN, Herkimer, NY. 
KING, CAROLE, Lynchburg. 
KING, ROBIN, Manlius, NY. 
KINNER, CATHERINE, Virginia 

Beach. 
KNOTT, KATHRYN, Fairfax. 



KOPELOVE, PAMELA, Portsmouth. 
KORB, LOIS, Annandale. 
KOSAKOWSKI, BERNARD, Richmond. 
KRAYNAK, KARLA, Woodbridge. 
KRIEGER, BARBARA, Haworth, NJ. 
KUCAN, NANCY, LaGrange, IL. 



KULISH, MARK, Alexandria. 
LAMBERT, JEAN MARIE, Elmont, NY. 
LANGFORD, KAREN, Norfolk. 



LANGFORD, NANCY, Colonial 

Heights. 
LARSON, LESLIE, Marshall. 
LASCARA, VIRGINL\, Virginia 

Beach. 



LAWSON, ANNETTE, White Stone. 
LAYNE, ELIZABETH, Lynchburg. 
LEAHY, JOY, Burke. 



LEAHY, RICHARD, Vienna, 

Austria. 
LEGARD, WILLIAM, Narrows. 
LETENDRE, CHARLENE, Slaters- 

ville, RI. 



LEWIS, NANCY, Martinsville. 
LEWIS, SUSAN, Alexandria. 
LEWIS, WARREN, Mt. Jackson. 
LINE, SUSAN, Newton Square, 

PA. 
LOGUE, SUSAN, Springfield. 
LONG, MARIE, Newark, OH, 




370/Sophomores 



• ••*****• 



******** 



* * * * 



******* 



******* 



^MH 



Ik 





One of the first things 
President Graves wanted 
to do when he came to campus 
was to be sure that members of 
the William and Mary family 
knew what was going on around 
campus before they read it in 
the daily newspaper. Infor- 
mation on policy changes and 
appointments he felt should be 
known internally before it was 
blazoned in newspapers and 
heard over the TV and radio. 

This is not always possible, 
but with that goal in mind, 
The William and Mary News was 
established to serve as an 
internal newsletter for ad- 
ministrators, faculty, staff, 
and students, published each 
Tuesday by the Office of 
University Communications and 
Information. 

An in-house publication, 



• » ♦ ♦ ♦ 



♦♦♦•♦♦ 




LONGEST, CAROL, Richmond. 
LOPEZ. MARTIN, Mt. Vernon. 
LOVING, CATHERINE, Richmond 
LOWENSTERN, EVELYN, Falls 

Church. 
LUBIN, KATHY, Springfield. 
LUNSFORD, JON, Richmond. 



LYLES, WILLIAM, Tampa, FL. 
LYNN, ELIZABETH, Gaithersburg, 

MD. 
MACDONALD, ELLEN, Pittsburgh. 

PA. 
MAERKER, MARTHA, Alexandria. 
MA,JIDULIA, ZAIN, Karachi, 

Pakistan. 
MAJOR, SARA, Covington. 

MANAKER, CINDY, Abington, PA. 

MANNING, STEWART, Portsmouth. 

MANZIE, AGNES MARIA, Williams- 
burg. 

MARAMAN, CYNTHIA, Cochran. GA. 

MARCHIANO, ELLEN, Flourtown. 
PA. 

MARCOTTE, MARIANNE. Stuarts 
Draft. 

MARKS, MAYES. Hopewell. 
MARKS, SUSAN, Staunton. 
MARSHALL, BRENDA, Alberta. 
MARTIN, KATHRYN. Alexandria. 
MARTIN, SUSAN, Culver, IN. 
MARTIN, TERESA, Salem. 



******** 



***** *» 



the News is written, edited, 
and type-set through the 
facilities of the Publica- 
tions Office. Camera-ready 
copy is provided for the 
printer, the Virginia Gazette. 

Copies are distributed 
around campus and mailed to 
faculty homes and to friends 
of the college who have re- 
quested subscriptions. 

A paper of record for the 
many memoranda, official no- 
tices and proceedings of the 
Board of Visitors, The News 
is largely a bulletin pub- 
lication, giving the campus 
community information on up- 
coming events, reporting 
faculty publications, honors, 
and grants, listing new appoint- 
ments, announcing cultural 
events and exhibits, and noting 
student honors and activities. 



♦♦♦»•♦♦ 



MARTINEZ, LAURA. Stuarts Draft. 
MARTINEZ, MARIO, Puerto Rico. 
MASON. CHERYL, Charlottesville. 
MASSENGILL, SUSAN, Hampton. 
MATTHEWS, BEVERLY. Chin- 

C0t6fl£U6 

MC AULIFFE, PATRICL^i. Brussels. 
Belgium. 



Sophomores/371 



»»♦»»♦»♦»♦»»»♦»»»• 



RELAX...ENJOY. .. 



MC CLANAHAN, ELIZABETH, Oakwood. 
MC CORD, BRUCE, Chattanooga, TN. 
MC CUE, KIM, Richmond. 
MC DOWELL, JULIE, Jacksonville, 

FL. 
MC GINNIS, NORA, Fredericksburg, 
MC INTOSH, DIANE, Rochester, NY. 



MC INTYRE, MAILE, Atlanta, GA. 
MC NAIR, CYNTHIA, Alexandria. 
MC NEEL, CAROLINE, Decatur, GA. 
MEEK, DEBORAH, Arlington. 
MELLINGER, ANNE, Arlington. 
MEYER, ERIC, Reston. 




******* 



********* 



* * * * 



****** 



*********** *.L 



A William & Mary ID. card 
was required for a number 
of routine processes that a col- 
lege student must incur, such as 
registering for classes, cashing 
checks, and eating Caf meals. 
But in spite of its role as a 
key element in the continual 
grind, the I.D. card also of- 
fered admittance to something 
on the opposite end of the spec- 
trum: a soothing method of 
escaping from these often for- 
midable surroundings could be had 
in a boat ride on Lake Matoaka. 

As one of the most pictur- 
esque, yet overlooked, spots on 
campus, Lake Matoaka was fre- 
quented most often by those 
enrolled in canoe classes. 
"It was such a relief to come 
to gym in a location like this — 
it's one place you can sort of 
'get away from it all,' yet 



«* » » ♦ ♦ 



MILLER, BECKY, Hampton. 
MILLER, KATHLEEN, Fork Union. 
MILLER, SUSAN, Richmond. 
MONTAGUE, GAYLE, Portsmouth. 
MORDHORST, ROBERT, Montreal, 

Canada. 
MORGANS, KATE, North Wales, PA. 



MORRIS, MICHAEL, Culpeper. 
MORRISON, NEIL, Norfolk. 
MORSE, CAROLYN, Binghamton, NY. 
MOSHER, NATALIE, Norfolk. 
MULLIN, NANCY, Rosemont, PA. 
MUNSON, STEVEN, Springfield. 



MURANO, MARY CATHERINE, Glas- 
tonbury, CT. 
MYLES, CAROL, Alexandria. 
NEAL, JOHN, Rome, GA. 
NEIGHBORS, MICHAEL, Lynchburg. 
NETTLES, BRYAR, Wakefield. 
NEWMAN, SCOTT, Richmond. 



still fulfill your curriculum 
requirements," pointed out 
a student from Canoeing L 
However, literally making 
your way onto the water was 
not necessary to experience 
the lake's restorative at- 
mosphere. An effective 
prescription for relieving a 
headache caused by any com- 
bination of factors was 
recommended as follows: take 
a cool fall day, make your 
way down a certain multi- 
colored leaf-strewn path, 
linger briefly to view the 
amphitheater on your right, but 
don't stop until you've made 
your way to this little wooden 
pier. Then sit back, relax, 
and take in Matoaka. 

THE SERENITY OF LAKE MATOAKA 
offers an ever-present respite from 
studying. 

********** 




372/Sophomores 




LAKE MATOAKA 



***************j^ 





J n f^ ^, 




NICHOLSON, LAURINDA, Chester- 
field. 

NIXON, HEATHER, Arlington. 

NOFFSINGER, STEPHANIE, Lynch- 
burg. 

NORDEEN NANCY, Malvern, PA. 

XOREIKO, BECKY, Alexandria. 

XORENBERG, LYNN, St. Peters- 
burg, FL. 

O'CONNELL, ANNE, Springfield. 
ODER, LANETTE, Fairfax. 
O'GRADY, KELLY, Hanover. 
OHLINGER, AMY. Staunton. 
O'KANE, KATHLEEN, Falls Church. 
OLIVER, ROBERT, Annandale. 



O'MALLEY, PETER, Clinton, MD 
O'NEILL, MARY, Roanoke. 
ORRICO, KRISTEN, Springfield. 



OVERTON, GAYE, Chesapeake. 
PASTERIS, LYNN, Pittsburgh, PA. 
PEPPER, BETH, Annandale. 



PEROE, CYNTHIA, Colonial 

Heights. 
PERROT, VIRGINIA, Petersburg. 
PHILIPP, BARBARA, Richmond. 



PHILLIPS, DAVID, Vienna. 
PHILLIPS, SUSAN, Long Island, 

NY. 
PICKETT, SUSAN, Charlottesville. 



PICKRELL, JANICE, Portsmouth. 
PINE, KIMBERLY, Winchester. 
POPE, ROBERT, Audubon, PA. 
POWELL, JEAN, Greensboro, NC. 
PRILLAMAN, SARAH, Norfolk. 
PRINCE, SARAH, Norfolk. 



PRITCHARD, PAMELA, Birmingham, 

AL. 
PUGH, SPENCER, Radford. 
PULS, STACY, Northfield, IL. 
PURDY, JEWEL, Dumfries. 
PURTILL, KATHLEEN, Glastonbury, 

CT. 
QUYNN, RUSSELL, Richmond. 



RAITCH, STEPHANIE, Newport 

News. 
RATHJEN, KIRA, Dallas, TX. 
REAMS, RICKY, Lynchburg. 
REARDON, ANN, Richmond. 
REDMOND, JOHN, Virginia Beach. 
REED. DONNA, Virginia Beach. 



Sophomores/373 



• *♦»•» 



• ♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦»•• 



************ 



************ 



THE 



REEKS, MILISSA, Virginia Beach. 
REID, CYNTHIA, Alexandria. 
RENGER, BERNARD, Falls Church. 
RHINEHART, LEE, Newtown, CT. 
RICHTER, LEE, Salem. 
RILEY, JAMES, Springfield. 



RITTNER, HANNO, Suffolk. 
ROBERTSON, DEBORAH, Endwell, 

NY. 
ROBINS, HUBEL, Richmond. 
ROBINSON, JANEEN, Annandale. 
ROBINSON, KATHRYN, Mt. Vernon. 
ROBISON, MARY, Annandale. 



ROGERS, STUART, Homer, NY. 
ROLEN, CYNTHIA, Richmond. 
ROLTSCH, JAN, South Burlington, 

VT. 
ROMANCZYK, JANE, Chesapeake. 
ROWE, SYLVU, Chester. 
ROWLAND, ALICE, Timonium, MD. 



SALE, EVA, Rappahannock 

Academy. 
SANCHEZ-MORENO, ANA MARIA, 

East Point, GA. 
SANDERLIN, MARILYN, Virginia 

Beach. 
SANDERS, DAVID, McLean. 
SANDERSON, LAURA, Memphis, TN. 
SAUNDERS, PAULINE, Richmond. 

SCHMELZ, CLAIRE, Dorado, PR. 
SCHMIDT, VIVIAN, Alexandria. 
SCHOEN, PAULA, Herndon. 



SCHOLAND, STEFANIE, Vinton. 
SCHOLZ, CHARISSE, Arlington. 
SCUSSEL, JANICE, Creve Coeur, 
MO. 



SEAMAN, ALAN, Vienna. 
SECRIST, LINDA, Roanoke. 
SEELE, STEPHAN, Kirkwood, MO. 



SEGGERMAN, VIRGINIA, Crystal 

Lake IL 
SEIDe'l, SANDRA, Alexandria. 
SEITZ, BARTON, Ithaca, NY. 



SELLERS, GINGER, Norfolk. 
SERENA, THOMAS, Butler, PA. 
SHAFFER, CARLA, Woodbury, NJ. 




* * * * * 



374/Sophomores 



CHEESE SHOP 



************************* 





Live your romantic fan- 
tasies of a wine and 
cheese picnic in a beautiful 
setting with a picnic basket 
from Williamsburg's Cheese 
Shop. The Cheese Shop will 
concoct a delectable combination 
of wine, cheese, and french 
bread to complement any setting 
Williamsburg has to offer. 

Besides a wide and delicious 
selection of wines and cheeses. 
The Cheese Shop offers other 
delights to tempt even the most 
finicky eater. During the 
lunch hour, the Cheese Shop has 
hearty, satisfying sandwiches 
made from their own imported 
meats and cheeses. And The 
Cheese Shop always stocks exotic 
blends of tea and coffee, unusual 
snacks and crackers, imported ice 
cream, and frozen yogurt. 

So for that special occasion or 
that craving hunger, visit The 
Cheese Shop. There the best can 
be found or made to order. 

CHRIS ZVOSEC finally makes a selection 
from the delectible delights of the 
Cheese Shop. 






SHARP, BARRY, Cincinnati. OH. 
SHEPPARD. JOANNE. Petersburg. 
SHIH, SHIH-SHING, Midlothian. 
SHOAF, SUSAN. Westchester. PA. 
SHUFFLEBARGER, CHARLES. Alexan- 
dria. 
SIBLEY, DIANE, Williamsburg. 



SIMPSON, GLORIA, Vienna. 

SIMS, LANA, Newport News. 
SITTERSON, KATHI, Portsmouth. 
SKAPARS, LINDA, Arlington. 
SKELLY, KIMBERLY, Rockville, 

MD. 
SKIBA, THOMAS, Wyckoff, NJ. 



SKOGLUND, CYNTHIA, Williams- 
burg. 
SMEDLEY, JANE, Riverdale, MD. 
SMITH, ANN, Pensacola, FL. 
SMITH JENIFER, Petersburg. 
SMITH, SUSAN, Hampton. 
STANZIANO, ANGELA, Falls Church. 



STAPLES, DONALD, Ashland. 
STARR, DEBORAH, York, PA. 
STASSI, MARGARET, Springfield. 
STEIMEL, STACY, Fort Worth, TX. 
STEIN, WARREN, Huntington, NY. 
STEPHENS, MARGARET, Springfield. 



STEPHENSON, SUSAN. Charlottes- 
ville. 



STEVENSON, AVA, Cockysville, 
MD. 



STICKEL, PAMELA, Cape Charles. 




STILLWELL, JEFFERY, Hampton. 



STRAIN, CHARLES, Rossville, GA. 



*^ 



* * * * 



****** 



Sophomores/37.5 



»♦♦♦»♦ 



♦ ♦♦Jf»#»»»»»¥»*-» 



S OPHOMORE 



STRUCKELL, SUSAN, Ocean City, 

NJ. 
SWAIM, CHARLES, Flint Hill. 
SWANSON, PATRICIA, Gretna. 
SWANTZ, LINDA, Fairfax. 
SWINER, CONNIE, Washington, DC. 
TAMURA, ROBERT, Oak Ridge, TN. 



TAYLOR, SANDRA, Virginia Beach. 
TEETER, HOLLY, Gettysburg, PA. 
TENNEY, CRAIG, Bethesda, MD. 
THOMAS, CARRI, El Paso, TX. 
THOMAS, GREGORY, Shrewsbury, 

MA. 
THOMAS, WILLL\M, Binghamton, 

NY. 



THORP, KATHLEEN, Woodbridge. 
TIERNEY, KEVIN, Sterling. 
TISON, SIDNEY, Hartsville, SC. 
TOMLINSON, KEITH, Towson, MD. 
TOUSSAINT, MICHELINE, McLean. 
TOWNSEND, SUSAN, Glen Arm, MD. 



TREPANIER, LAUREN, Loudonville, 

NY. 
TRICE, RUTH, South Boston. 
TULLOH, BARBARA, Emporia. 
TUMBLESON, KAREN, Springfield. 
TURNER, KATHRYN, Appomattox. 
UMSTOTT, NANCY, McLean. 



UNRUH, MURRY, Chesapeake. 

VAN DE CASTLE, KAREN, Watchung, 

NJ. 
VAUGHAN, CATHERINE, Richmond. 



VOLLRATH, MARGARET, Virginia 

Beach. 
WAGNER, ROBERT, Nurenburg, 

Germany. 
WALK, BETH, Winchester. 



WALTRICH, STEVEN, Chester. 
WAMPLER, DOROTHY, Broadway. 
WATSON, DEBORAH, Rowayton, CT. 



WEBER, DONNA, Villanova, PA. 
WEEKS, MARGARET, Orange, CT. 



WEIHS, WILLIAM, Old Greenwich, 

CT. 
WELLS, SUZANNE, Portsmouth 




diM 4 




* • * * * 



* * * * * 



********** 



376/Sophomores 



PROFILE 



******* 



***** 



******** 




WENDT, DIANE, Wilmington, DE. 
WEST, ANITA, Marion. 
WESTLAKE. WILLIAM, Post Rest- 
ante, Switzerland. 
WHITE, STACEY, Abingdon. 
WHITE, TARA, Media, PA. 
WHITLEY, KAREN, Portsmouth. 



WHITMIRE, JERRY, Arlington. 
WIELAND, CHRIS, McLean. 
WILLIAMS, DEBRA, Alexandria. 
WILLIAMS, DUDLEY, Ringgold. 
WILLIAMS, SUSAN, Blairs. 
WILLIS. CYNTHIA, Washington, 
DC. 



WILSON, CATHERINE, Bethesda, 

MD. 
WINGO, DOUG, HoUins. 
WITTKAMP, BIFF, Richmond. 
WOLFE, SALLY, Clifton Forge 
WOOD, JEFFREY, Pittsburgh, PA. 
WOOD, SARAH, Richmond. 



WRABLEY, DEIRDRE, Arlington. 
WRIGHT, ELIZABETH, Wheeling, 

WV. 
WRIGHT, RONALD, Decatur, GA. 
YAMASHITA, YUKIKO, Los Angeles, 

CA. 
YEAGER, GAIL, Linwood, NJ. 
YOUNG, JOHN, Bowling Green, KY. 



r ***** * 



***** 



***** 



***** 



***** 




******* 



For Anne-Merle Bryant, 
life as a sophomore at 
W & M was quieter and more 
settled than freshman year. 
Anne-Merle, a probable busi- 
ness major, feels that she 
has established an identity 
for herself through her in- 
volvement in various activ- 
ities. Her outlook on life 
at W & M is one of action: 
"Get out, join up, meet 
people, experience new 
things." And she does — 
Anne-Merle is active in 
several campus organiza- 
tions, especially political- 
ly-oriented ones, and admits 
that a career in politics is 
a definite possibility. As 
Corresponding Secretary for 
the College Republicans, she 
has come into contact with 
many politically-prominent 
persons. She served as a 
Holton campaign worker at the 
state senatorial convention 
last summer, which she feels 
gave her first-hand experience 
on the mechanics of the pol- 

AN AVID INTEREST in current politics 
is evidenced by Anne-Merle's choice of 
pin-ups. 
t**************""" 



itical system. 

Anne-Merle is assistant press 
aide for the Student Associa- 
tion, which involves the com- 
pilation and distribution of 
SA calendars and newsletters; 
a member of Young Americans for 
Freedom, and campus correspon- 
dent for the Young Virginians 
section of her hometown news- 
paper, the Richmond, Virginia 
News Leader. 

In reference to academics at 
W & M, Anne-Merle stated, "I 
had a good high school educa- 
tion and that makes a differ- 
ence. But I still have to 
work very hard. It's frush- 
trating, but at the same time, 
challenging." Biking in CW 
and swimming were tension- 
easers for Anne-Merle. As 
creative outlets, she enjoyed 
photography, drawing, and 
playing the piano. 

Anne-Merle felt that she 
learned as much from her 
extra-curricular activities 
as from academics, and con- 
sequently, took advantage of 
every opportunity to use her 
talents. 



*************** 



****** 



Sophomores/377 



♦ »»♦»♦♦♦»» 



COLONIAL DELI 



************ 



ABBOTT, BARBARA, Charlottes- 
ville. 

ADAMS, ANNETTE, Willowick, 
OH. 

ADKINS, KENT, Charles City. 

AKERHIELM, LAURA, Middletown, 
NJ. 

ALEXANDER, STACY, Richmond. 

ALFORD, GRACE, Winchester. 

AMAYA, LISA, Durham, NC. 
AMBLER, ROBERT, Glenside, PA. 
AMES, HEIDI, Herndon. 
AMT, EMILIE, Takoma Park, MD. 
ANDERSON, MARGARET, Portsmouth. 
ARAI, MAYA, Burke. 



ARMBRISTER, SARAH, Wytheville. 
ARMSTRONG, TRACEY, Buena Vista. 
ARNOLD, AMY, Virginia Beach. 



ASCUNCE, ISABEL, Falls Church. 
ASHBY, ALBERT, Exmore. 
BAIN, DONNA, Lynchburg. 



BAIRD, SARAH, Wytheville. 
BAKER, DUNE, Belleville, 

IL. 
BALCER, MARC, Lutherville, 
MD. 



BALDT, KIMBERLY, Wilmington, 

BALLARD, CHARLOTTE, Roanoke. 
BATES, NANCY, Virginia Beach. 



BEALES, RANDOLPH, Boydton. 
BELCHER, SHARON, Chesapeake. 
BENENSON, ESTHER, Richmond. 



BENJAMIN, CHRISTIAN, Oakton. 
BENTON, ANNE, Charleston, SC. 
BENNETT, TODD, Danville. 
BINZER, RANDALL, Alexandria. 
BLAIN, CYNTHIA, Clinton, OH. 
BLANK, MARILYN, Vienna. 



BLEVINS, CAROL, Abingdon. 
BLOOMER, BRENDA, Dumfries. 
BLOWS, DAVID, Norfolk. 
BOATRIGHT, GEORGE, Lynchburg. 
BOBB, SUSAN, Fredericksburg. 
BOGGS, JANE, Lynchburg. 




378/Freshmen 



******** 



****** 



***** 



********* 



****** 



************* 





t* * * * * 



Everyday, from 9 a.m. to 1 
a.m., William and Mary 
students patronize the Colonial 
Deli on Scotland Street where 
they can satisfy any craving with 
a wide selection of food and 
munchies. The Colonial Deli has 
anything from sandwiches and 
pizza to popcorn and pickles for 
the late night study break or 
the Saturday lunch. 

Specializing in take-out foods, 
the Colonial Deli has a large and 
delicious menu of subs and other 
goodies. Prepared quickly and 
expertly, this menu features lower 
prices for the dollar-conscious 
student. The Colonial Deli also 
offers many varieties of wine 
and beer and keeps a wide range 
of groceries and necessities on 
hand for easy shopping. 

When students go to the "deli," 
they go to the Colonial Deli where 
fast service, wide variety, and 
lower prices make it the best 
choice. 

A STUDY BREAK to the Colonial Deli is 
a tempting treat for Tracey Stephenson. 



* * * * * 




BOND, CAROLYN, Great Falls. 
BOND, MARGARET, Winter Park, 

FL. 
BONNER, KATHLEEN, Chantillv. 
BOWLES, MARY, Covington. 
BOWMAN, ANGELA, Charles City. 
BOYCE, JANET, Jacksonville, 

FL. 



BRADY, PAMELA, Alexandria. 
BREWER, LAURI, St. Petersburg, 

FL. 
BRINK, JULIE, North Haven, 

CT. 
BRINKLEY, ROBERT, Towson, MD. 
BRITTAIN, KIM, Charlottesville. 
BRITTEN, TRACY, Manassas. 



BROCKENBROUGH, WILLSON, Rich- 
mond. 



BRODEUR, JEANNE, Falls Church. 



BROOKE, THOMAS, Vienna. 



BROWN. PATRICIA, Springfield. 



BROWN, SIDNEY, Brodnax. 



BROWN, WENDY, Hingham, MA. 
BUCHWALTER, MARIE, Fairfax. 
BUCKLEY, COLIN, Thornton, PA. 
BUDD, KAREN, Fairfax. 
BUSHEY, JULIA, Lurav. 
CABE, CRISTA, Waynesboro. 



CADE, DAVID, Fairfax. 
CAMACHO, JOY, Virginia Beach. 
CAMPBELL, ALICE, Alexandria. 
CAMPBELL, CAROL, Jamestown, 

NY. 
CAMPBELL, GLENN, Norristown, 

PA- 
CAMPBELL, JOANNE, Newport News. 



Freshmen/379 



» » * » » 



* * ¥ * * 



*****¥*************¥** 



PLAYING 



CARR, LISA, Berlin, NY. 
CARROLL, CLARENCE, Orange. 
CARSON, BEVERLEY, Franklin. 
CARTER, JACK, Virginia Beach. 
CARVER, CAROLE, Lexington. 
CATHEY, KAREN, STERLING. 



CEA, KATHY, Rockville, MD. 
CECCA, CHRISTINA, Falls Church. 
CERNY, MARK, Arlington. 
CHARTERS, LOUISA, Syracuse, 

NY. 
CHOATE, RICHARD, Springfield. 
CLARK, LINDSEY, Front Royal. 



CLARK, LUCY, Union Level. 
CLARK, RICHARD, Hampton. 
CLAYTON, GINA, Newport News. 
CLAYTON, MARK, Stanton, NJ. 
CLINE, ALICE, Harrisonburg. 
COATES, CAROL, Richmond. 



COCHRAN, JAMES, New York, NY. 
COLE, BARBARA, Clark, NJ. 
Collier, STEPHANY, Richmond. 
COLLINS, RUTH, Alexandria. 
COLMAN, PHYLLIS, Fort Clayton, 

Canal Zone. 
COMSTOCK, ELIZABETH, Winches- 



CONAWAY, SANDYRA, Prince 

George County. 
CONLON, NANCY, Wilton, CT. 
COWLEY, STACEY, Elkton, MD. 
COX, ALICE, Deston, FL. 
CRANK, DAVID, Richmond. 
CRAWFORD, ANNA, Portsmouth. 



CROMLEY, CLAYTON, Chantilly. 
CROSSETT, BEVERLY, McLean. 
CROWDER, SUSAN, Colonial 

Heights. 
CSELLAK. LINDA, West Palm 

Beach, FL. 
CULLIFER, SUSAN, Newport News. 
CUMMINS, CLIFFORD, Windsor. 



CUNNINGHAM, BARBARA, Shackle- 
ford. 

CURTIS, WAYNE, Fredericksburg. 

CUTHRELL, JANE, Danville. 

DAGILAITIS, BLAISE, Brussels, 
Belgium. 

D'AGOSTINO, DENISE, Marion. 

DANIELS, JERI, Fairfax. 



DARRELL, STEPHANIE, Lexington. 
DAVIS, KAYE, Stony Creek. 
DAVIS, KIMBERLY, Middleburg. 
DAVIS, ROBERT, Woodcliff Lake, 

NJ. 
DECHIARA, CATHLEEN, Midlothian. 
DEERING, TRACY, PinesviUe, OH. 



DELL, ROBERT, West Simsbury, CT. 
DELSERONE, TONY, Elkhart, IN. 
DISQUE, DANA, Winchester. 
DIXON, CAROLYN, Bedford. 
DIXON, KATHARINE, Franktown. 
DODD, DAVID, Manassas. 





>(!%m 




380/Freshmen 



A***************************************** 




DOROW, JLTDY, Arlington. 
DOW, JENNIFER, Grosse Pointe 

Farms, MI. 
DOYLE, KEVIN, Vienna. 
DREYER, MARK, Roanoke. 
DRIVER, DOUGLAS, Timberville. 
DUFFY, BARBARA, Annandale. 



****** 



m W 



hat do the National 

Gallery, Colonial 
Williamsburg, a sewage treat- 
ment plant, the Museum of the 
History of Technology, and 
Christ's Church all have in 
common? These were just a 
few of the places that students 
visited when their classes 
ventured beyond the four walls 
of the classroom to the 
proverbial "Real World." 

With CW just down the road, 
students of American history 
had an ideal setting to actually 
see and experience what they 
were learning about. But field 
trips were organized to take 
advantage of not only the 
resources of CW but also the 
state of Virginia and Washing- 
ton, D.C. French Civilization 
classes wandered through a 
French market in Georgetown, 
and archaeology classes 
participated in an excavation 
of a site in Richmond. Religion 
classes studied old churches 
throughout the state — some 
students even went all the way 
to Ohio to study Amish society 
first-hand. 

Participation in field trips 
was very rarely mandatory, but 
student interest and attendance 
were high. Instead of scurrying 
from one brick classroom building 
to another as they did on most 
days, students were able to see 
and do what they just talked 
about on other days. 

ON A CLASS FIELD TRIP, a student 
discovers the perils of studying geology. 



************************** 



******** 




DUFFY, -JULIA, Fort Worth, TX. 
DUNBAR, THOMAS, Roanoke. 
DUNN, TERESA, Manassas. 
EARL, KATHRYN, Springfield. 
EGAN, CLAIRE, Dunn Loring. 
ELLIOTT, MARILYN, McLean. 



Freshmen/381 



^^^,^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



♦ ♦♦»♦, ,,»J^,,,1^,^^^^^^ 



FRESHMAN 



ELLIS, CARROLL, Arlington. 
ELLIS, HAL, Va. Beach. 
ELLIXSON, BONNIE, Chesapeake 



ELLS, JULIE, Suffolk. 
ENGELHARDT, NANCYE, West Long 

Branch, NJ. 
ETHERIDGE, NELSON, Va. Beach. 



EVANS, KAREN, Hampton. 
EVANS, KIMBERLY, Norfolk. 
EVANS, WILLL^M, Suffolk. 



EYE, DAVID, Appomattox. 
FAILOR, PATRICE, McLean. 
FEHNEL, PAULA, RockviUe, MD. 



FENIMORE, DEBORAH, McLean. 

FENITY, JOANNE, Cranbury, NJ 
FENWICK, DONNA, Colonial Beach 



FERRIS, SUSAN, Hampton. 
FINDLAY, JULIE, Alexandria. 
FINLEY, PEGGY, Manassas. 
FISHER, CHRISTOPHER, Wood- 
bridge. 
FISHER, SUSAN, Clinton, CT. 
FISHER, VALERIE, Roanoke. 



FLAIG, JUDITH, Midlothian. 
FOLAN, JOHN, Fredericksburg. 
FORBES, JEFFREY, Roanoke 
FORTHUBER, STEPHEN, Richmond 
FOSTER, AMY, Brookneal. 
FOSTER. NANCY, Madison Heights. 



FOURNIER, ELIZABETH, Arling- 
ton. 
FOX, CYNTHIA, Oldhams. 
FOX, MORTON, Lynchburg. 
FRANZYSHEN, STEPHEN, Hampton 
FRYE, JAMES, McLean. 
FULLER, JENNIFER, Reston. 



GALLI, ODETTE, Morristown, NJ 
GARLAND, KAREN, North Cald- 
well, NJ. 
GARRETT, BONNIE. Sterling Park 
GEPHARDT, GREGORY, McLean. 
GEITHMAN, JAMES, Newport News 
GENADIO, PATRICIA, Fairfax. 



» ♦♦♦«*#»»4(»<i»»^. 




382/Freshmen 



PROFILE 



******1t***1,^,1,^,1,^,^,i,^,^,^,^,^,^,^,^,^,^,^,^,^r 



******* 




One of the most crucial 
adjustments encountered 
by college freshmen was leaving 
home and "finding a place" 
within the ranks of hundreds of 
other equally paranoid novices. 
Although far from her home in 
Michigan, freshman Jennifer 
Dow found herself settled, 
situated, and well-suited in 
a very short time. Jennie 
considered dorm life in Yates 
a great living situation and 
she relished the experience it 
provided for establishing close 
friendships. 

Jennie quickly discovered 
the self-structured system at 
William and Mary. The major 
aspect she noted was the small 
amount of time spent in the 
classroom, leaving students 
more studying to do on their 
own. Planning her schedule 
was another challenge Jennie 
enjoyed. It gave her a sense 
of independence along with the 
responsibilities of budgeting 
her time. 

For Jennie, freshman year 
was not an especially trau- 
matic time. 



******* 



GERIS, JUSTINE, Manassas. 
GIESECKE, CORINNE, Fairfax. 
GILES, MARK, Tabb. 
GIOIA, DEBBIE, Fairfax. 
CLANCY, CATHERINE, Fredericks- 
burg. 
GONZALES, ROCETA, Elmont, NY. 



GOODELL, LAURIE, Charlottes- 
ville. 
GORDINEER. BRIAN, Williamsburg. 
GREENWOOD, CHERYL, McLean. 
GRIFFITHS, JENNIFER, Arlington. 
GUENTHER, NORMAN, Midlothian. 
GURLEY. CHRISTINE, Chase City. 



HALEY, KAREN, Roanoke. 
HALEY, MARY, Bowling Green. 
HALLMAN, ROBERT, Manassas. 
HAMILTON, LYNN, Newport News. 
HAMILTON, STASIA, Philadelphia, 

PA. 
HAMLIN, TERRI, Alexandria. 



HAMMERLAND, SUSAN, Piedmont, 

CA. 
HAMMOND, DEBRA, Falls Church. 
HARCUM, JANET, Franklin. 
HARDIN, KELLY, Springfield. 
HARDING, LEANNAH, Burgess. 
HARMAN. SARAH. Fairfax. 



Freshmen/.383 



* * * * * 



♦ ♦♦♦»» 



» ♦ » ♦ * 



*»»»♦•♦ 



HARRIS, ARTHUR, Virginia Beach. 

HARRISON, ELIZABETH, Brussels, 
Belgium. 

HARRISON, EMMETT, Old Green- 
wich, CT. 

HARRISON, JAMES, Fredericks- 
burg. 

HASHIMOTO, KAREN, Hebron, MD. 

HATCHER, RAYMOND, Lynchburg. 

HATCHETT, AMBLER, Virginia 

HAYES,' CAMBRAI, Norfolk. 
HAYES, VALERIE, West Chester, 

PA. 
HAYNIE, DONNA, Reedville. 
HEDELT, ANNE, Warsaw. 
HENLEY, DEBORAH, Manakin-Sabot. 



HENRY, KATHLEEN, Hockessin, DE. 
HERNDON, CLAUDE, Madison. 
HESTERMAN, KIMBERLY, Crofton, 

MD. 
HIGGER, HARRIET, Portsmouth. 
HIGGINS, PATRICIA, Springfield. 
HILL, ELIZABETH, Manassas. 



HILLERY, PAMELA, Springfield. 
HIRSCHMAN, LYNNE, Indiana- 
polis, IN. 
HOGENDOBLER, MATTHEW, Virginia 

HOGSHEAD, NANCY, Waynesboro. 
HOLMAN, MINDY, Haddonfield, 

N.J. 
HOOD, ALISON, Annandale. 



HORNE, PATRICIA, Chesapeake. 
HOWARTH, JAN, Virginia Beach. 
HOWE, KATHARINE, Cincinnati, 
OH. 



HOWE, PAUL, Arlington. 
HOWELL, RALPH, Suffolk 
HUDDLESTON, JON, Virginia 
Beach. 



HUDSON, DAVID, Washington. 
HUNDLEY, BETSY. Richmond. 
HURLBERT, JEANNE, Sunburv, 

N.C. 



HURLEY, HELEN, Fairfax. 
HUSTED, ANN, Camp Hill, PA. 
lATRIDIS, ARIS, Richmond. 



JACK, JERI, Winchester. 
JACOBSEN. LORA, Landing, NJ. 
JAMES, PATRICIA, Palm Beach 
Gardens, FL. 



384/Freshmen 




♦ » » ♦ 



DD DELIGHTS 



********* 




******** 



JENKINS, SCOTT, Amissville. 
JENNINGS, ANN, Chesapeake. 
JOHNSON, KAREN, Huntinjrton 

Station, NY. 
JOHNSON, KIMBERLY, Arlington. 
JOHNSON, MARY SUE, Richmond. 
JOHNSON, SARA, Vienna. 



JOHNSTON, JAMIE, Goode. 
JONES, JAMES, Kingsporl, TN, 
JONES, ROBERT, Martinsville. 
JORDAN, DEBBIE, Suffolk. 
KATZMAN, DAVID, Margate, NJ. 
KAZEMI, ZOHREH, Tehran, Iran. 



KEATON, MARY MARGARET, 

Lynchburg. 
KILIAN, CONNIE, Franklin. 
KIM, IRENE, Williamsburg. 
KIRKLEY, EVELYN, Lexington. 
KLETT, MARY, Alexandria. 
KLINGMEYER, WILBERT, Virginia 

Beach. 



KLOEDEN, MARTIN, Alexandria. 
KRAEMER, RONALD, Lawrenceville. 
LAGOMARCINO, LESLIE, Arling- 
ton. 
LANGSTON, LAURA, Hampton. 
LAPARO, SUSAN, Wvomissing, PA. 
LAPKIN, GLENN, Mbntvale, NJ. 



The Prince George Deli was 
a continued hit this year, 
with its inexpensive pitchers 
of beer, informal setting, and 
soulful tunes. "Dirty Deli" 
regulars found that the deli 
had assumed a much larger role 
in the W&M social scene in the 
past few years. What was once 
an out-of-the-way place to share 
a pitcher of beer had become a 
popular hang-out for late-nite 
partiers. All of the pressures 
and frustrations of the day 
somehow seemed to fade in the 
close, relaxed atmosphere of 
the Prince George Deli. But 
a mellow mood was not the only 
mood fostered there. Explosive 
music and energetic patrons 
usually reached a peak around 
midnight, when beer flowed and 
the small, dimly-lit room was 
packed. At the fateful hour 
of two, when the lights flick- 
ered, the time came when the 
DD fun had to end and all good 
DDers must stagger home. 

THE ATMOSPHERE OF THE DIRTY 
DELI provides a welcome change for Connie 
Foran, Jim Shields, Jeanne Lull, and 
Tricia Knauer. 



******* 



Freshmen/385 



¥♦■»»»♦*»• 



SELECTIVITY IN ART 



******** 



LAWRENCE, SUSAN, Virginia 

LAWSON, JOY, Ruckersville. 
LAWSON, RINDY, Appomattox. 
LEAPTROT, KEVIN, Hampton. 
LECAIN, DENISE, Richmond. 
LEFTWICH, THERESA, Chesapeake 



LEISTER, KATHERINE, Odenton, 

MD. 
LEMON, LINDA, Roanoke. 
LETENDRE, JACQUELINE, Vienna 
LEVIN, MARLA, Falls Church. 
LILE, LAIRD, Ada, OH. 
LITTLE, AMY, Bristol. 



» » • ¥ 



♦ ♦»♦♦» 



44 



rt is an exercise in sel- 
L %.ectivity. You have to 
emphasize the right things." 
In describing art, Para Drake, 
who specialized in the painting 
studio, also touched on an as- 
pect of student art shows — 
selectivity. The judges had 
the job of choosing which 
works were to be hung in the 
exhibit from those entered 
by the artistically talented 
members of the student body. 

Held annually in the spring, 
the student art show was or- 
ganized and run by interested 
students. This year they had 
the added help of the newly- 
formed Fine Arts Society. 

Many of the exhibits were 
characterized by an aesthetic 
quality which is traditional in 
the William and Mary studio. 
They were not oriented toward 
abstract design, but were 
inclined to be representa- 
tional. Whatever their style, 
the works which "em- 
phasized the right things" 
were the ones which were 
worthy of merit awards. 
******************* 



LONG, LISA, Milford, CT. 
LONG, NANCY, McLean. 
LONGWORTH. KATHERINE, Maple 

Glen, PA. 
LOWDEN, JAMES, Telford, PA. 
LOWRY, DEBORAH, Sandston. 
LUEDERS, MARY BETH, Hamilton. 



LUNDAY, JENNIFER, Virginia 

Beach. 
LYSHER, JUDITH, King George. 
MAHER, MARGARET, Hampton. 
MALLARE. MICHAEL, Danville. 
MALLORY, LYNN, Manassas. 
MALONE, JOHN, Maywood. NJ. 




386/Freshmen 



* * * * 



****** 



****** 




MARCHBAN'K. ROBERT, Laurel, MD. 
MARCOU. MARY, Norfolk. 
MARKEY, JOHN, Roanoke. 
MARQUIS, SUSAN, Annandale. 
MARRS, BRADLEY, Richmond. 
MARTIN, DAVID, Galax. 



MARTIN, PAMELA, Shelby, NC, 
MARTINO, JOYCE, Seaford. 
MASON, ANN. Madison Heights. 
MAST, CHRISTOPHER. Suffolk. 
MATTSON, ALEXANDRA, Arlington, 
MAXEY, CATHERINE, Dillwvn. 



MC AVOY, LAURIE, Phoenixville, 
PA. 

MC CORMACK, MARGARET, Alexan- 
dria. 

MC COY, REBECCA, Newport, RI. 



MC ELLIGOTT, TERRI, Fairfax. 
MC GANN, EDWARD, South River, 

NJ. 
MC KIERNAN, MICHAEL, Strasburg, 



MC NEIL, TRACY, Springfield. 
MC NEY, ELIZABETH, Suches, GA. 
MC SHERRY, PERRY, York, PA. 



MERISH, LORI, Butler, NJ, 
MEYER, DAVID, Richmond. 
MIANTE, PAULA, Newport News. 



MIKA, ANDREW, Falls Church. 
MILLARD, BECKY, Dumfries, 
MILLER, MARY JANE, Alexandria. 



MILLS, BETH, Bloxom. 
MILLS, ROBERT, Alexandria. 
MILNE. SCOTT. Lvnchburg. 
MOCARSKI, KATHY, Culpeper. 
MOCK, LISA, Annandale. 
MONCURE, BETH, Blackstone. 



MOONEY. LAURA, Virginia Beach, 
MORRISON, KIMBERLY, Chesapeake. 
MORRISON, LINDA, Lexington. 
MORSE, ANN, Midlothian. 
MUDD, MARL\, McLean. 
MURPHREE, SUSAN, Alexandria. 



Freshmen/387 



************************** 



MURPHY, LYNN, Newport News. 
MURRAY, GEORGINA, Alexandria. 
NARY, KEVIN, Arlington. 
NEWELL, JENNIFER, Springfield. 
NEWELL, SUSAN, North Palm 

Beach, FL. 
NIEBUHR, DAVID, West Islip, NY. 



************ 



THE 



NOLAN, DIANA, Cincinnati, OH. 
NORMENT, MARCIA, Hampden-Svdney. 
NUCKOLS, BETSY, Hurt. 



NUCKOLS, MARY, Chatham. 
O'GORMAN, SUSAN, White Plains, NY. 
O'HANLON, ANNEMARIE, Fairfax. 



O'SULLIVAN, SUSAN, Springfield. 
OTTO, STEVE, Kailua, HI. 
OVERTON, WILLIAM, Chesapeake. 



PAGANS, REBECCA, Vinton. 
PAINTER, JACK, Richmond. 
PALMORE, PAULA, Vienna. 



PANG, WEI-SHUAN, Annapolis, MD. 
PANOS, HELEN, Newport News. 
PARAMORE, TERESA, Hampton. 



PARDEE, ROSAMOND, North Reding- 

ton Beach, FL. 
PASTORE, LORA, Reston. 
PATTERSON, PATSY, Chatham. 
PAULINO, ANNA CRISTINA, 

Alexandria. 
PAYNE, CHARLES NELSON. JR., 

Boones Mill 
PEARSON, ELLYN, Lynchburg. 

PEEBLES, THOMAS, Kingston 

Springs. TN. 
PENNEWELL, ANNE, Chincoteague. 
PETERSON, BLAKE, Reston. 
PEWOICHIK. JAMES, Alexandria. 
PHILLIPS, HOWARD LEE, 

Joppatowne, MD. 
PICKELL, STUART, Vienna. 



PLUMLEY, ALLAN, Arlington. 
PORTER, JANET, Glen Allen. 
POWELL, JAMES, Bloomfield, NJ. 
PRICE, CHARLES, Richmond. 
PRINCE. WARREN, Virginia Beach. 
QUIGLEY, ELLEN, Springfield. 




388/Freshmen 



TOYMAKER 



■»****** 



****************** 




***** 



********* 



The opportunity to re- 
live childhood fanta- 
sies exists at Williamsburg's 
Toymaker. On entering the 
shop, the student is immediate- 
ly sent back in time to a peri- 
od when toys — stuffed animals, 
toy soldiers, and doll furni- 
ture — were the dreamer's most 
important desire. And indeed, 
the Toymaker is a child's 
(and adult's) dream come true. 
Stuffed animals line the walls 
and fill the windows, tiny 
pieces of furniture occupy 
miniature houses, toy trains 
race over bridges and through 
tunnels, and colorful mario- 
nettes twist and turn on in- 
visible strings. There is even 
a wide variety of toys for the 
grownup "kid": games of Clue, 
Monopoly, and Password, cards, 
model kits, and Christmas or- 
naments. So, step into the 
Toymaker and see what it has 
to tempt you. 

A DELIGHTFUL "MUPPET" PUPPET 
entertains Kim Blankenbaker at the 
Toymaker. 




QUIGLEY, KATHERINE, Alexandria. 
QUINDLEN, KATHLEEN, Falls 

Church. 
QUINE, SUSAN. Schenectady. NY 
QUINN, HEATHER, Vienna.' 
RATCHFORD, DIANE, Stuart's 

Draft. 
RATZLAFF, LESLIE. Falls Church. 



RAWDING, ARTHUR, Convent, N.J. 



RAWLINGS, MICHAEL, Hopewell. 



RAYMOND. PATRICIA, Fairfax. 



REEKS. KAREN, Virginia Beach. 



REEVES, SONNY, Woodbridge 



» • » ♦ ♦ 



»»»♦»♦♦ 



♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 




REXRODE. BRENDA, Richmond. 
RHEIN. -JOHN, Birdsboro, PA. 
RHODES. PAMELA, Portsmouth. 
RICHARDS. YEVETTE, Ettrick. 
RICKETTS, JENNIFER. Richmond. 
RIDDLE, MARK, Rockville, MD. 



RIDENOUR. SUSAN, Fairfax. 
ROBERTS, DAVID. Cranford. NJ. 
ROBERTS, ELIZABETH, Richmond. 
ROBERTSON, VIRGINIA. Ashland. 
ROBINSON, CYNTHIA, Salem. 
ROBINSON, LISA, Reston. 



ROGERS, DAVID, Salem. 
ROMEO, MARU, Richmond. 
ROSS. AMY, Allison Park, PA. 
RUDOLPH. MARK, Elm Grove, WI. 
RUFFNER, KEVIN, Alexandria. 
RUPERT. DAVID, Lynchburg. 



Freshmen/389 



♦ ♦♦»♦»♦♦ 



♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ¥ 



»♦♦♦**» 



♦ ♦»»»♦♦♦'(! 



RYAN, ELIZABETH, Arlington. 
SANDERFORD, MARY ANN, Hunts- 

ville, AL. 
SARTOR, MARK, King of Prussia, 

PA. 
SATTERFIELD, BRENDA, Halifax. 
SAUNDERS, SARA, Lynchburg. 
SAVAGE, BILL, Pottersville, NJ. 



SCARLETT, DIANA, Fairfax. 
SCHELLENBERG, ROBERT, Virginia 

Beach. 
SCHENARTS, SUSAN, Alexandria. 
SCHNEIDER, TIMOTHY, West 

Chester, PA. 
SCHNELL, SHARON, Norfolk. 
SCHOCKLIN, DONNA, Portsmouth. 



SCHONER, AMY, Vienna. 
SCHREFFLER, VIVIAN, South 

Boston. 
SCHWARTZ, CAROLE, Annandale. 
SCHWARZ, LAURA, Glen Rock, NJ. 
SCHWENKE, BARBARA, Potsdam, NY 
SCOFIELD, DONALD, Newton, NJ. 



SCOTT, KATHALEEN, Chattanooga, 

TN. 
SELLERS, CHARLES, Norfolk. 
SESSOMS, KARI, Williamsburg. 
SHANNON, LYNNE. Havertown, PA. 
SHARP, NANCY, Robersonville, 

NC. 
SHAW, ANDREA, Annandale. 



Freshmen were continually 
put on the spot: "Now 
just what exactly influenced 
your decision to come to the 
College of William and Mary?" 
(often inquired a curious 
upperclassman in his unsuc- 
cessful attempts to recall 
what initially possessed him 
to decide the same). Origin- 
ally planning to go to Davidson, 
freshman Scott Milne changed 
his mind when he "fell in love 
with the campus," acknowledged 
the great academic reputation, 
and found the size to be "just 
right." 

Scott admitted not knowing 
what to expect, but quickly 
discovered two major things 
here which came by no means 
in small doses: freedom and 
work. Also the opportunity for an 
"adequate" social life was a- 
vailable, especially for fresh- 
men. Fitting right into his home 
in Dupont, Scott had "no prob- 
lems adjusting to campus life." 

FRESHMAN SCOTT MILNE finds the size 
of William and Mary to be "just right." 




************** 



390/Freshmen 



FRESHMAN PROFILE 



*********** 








SHAW, ELISA, Columbia, MD. 
SHAWVER, JERE, Covington. 
SHEA, KELLY, Richmond. 
SHEA, MICHAEL, Branford, CT. 
SHEWMAKE, WILLIAM, Richmond. 
SHINE, GLENN, Elm Grove, WI. 



SHINN, SUSAN. Newport News. 
SHOEMAKER, ANNE, Salisburv, 

MD. 
SHOMAKER, JOHN, Richmond. 
SHULL, ROBERT, Reston. 
SIDES. DEBRA, Leesburg. 
SIEGFRIEND, ELIZABETH, Voor- 

hees, NJ. 



SIMMS, KATHRYN, Waverly. 
SLEZAK, KAREN, Dumfries. 
SMITH, ANNAMARIE, Virginia 

Beach. 
SMITH, CRAIG, Alexandria. 
SMITH, ELIZABETH, Richmond. 
SMITH, JANICE, Vienna, 



SNELLINGS, KARLA, Frederick- 
sburg. 
SNYDER, KELLI, Fairfax. 
SOKKAPPA, PADMINI, Vienna. 
SOLOMON, CARRIE, Richmond. 
SPENCER, SUSAN, Vienna. 
SPIVEY, DONALD, Richmond. 



SPONG, MARTHA, Williamsburg. 
STANTEN, EVELYN, Hampton. 
STEPHAN, KATHLEEN, Vienna, 



STEPHENSON, CAROLYN, Chesa- 
peake. 

STERLING, STACY, Richmond. 

STILES, MARGARET, Williams- 
burg. 



STILL, CONNIE, Collinsville. 
STRICKLAND, SCOTT, Virginia 

Beach. 
STROCK, ELIZABETH, Blue Anchor, 

NJ. 



STRYKER, SHARON, Belle Mead, 

NJ. 
STULCE, VALARIE, Warren, NJ, 
SURPRENANT, SALLY, Rockville, 

MD. 



SWAIN, TRACEY, Petersburg. 
SWINK, DENISE, Salem. 
SYRETT, ROBIN, White Stone. 



********** 



Freshmen/391 



******* 



*************** 



» ♦ » ♦ » 



******* 



♦ » » • 



MASSEY'S 



For some reason, Crim Dell 
is particularly beautiful 
today. The leaves on the trees 
around its edge are turning; its 
water is clear and still, and 
ducks are swimming peacefully 
on its surface. What a perfect 
day for a picture. Luckily, 
Massey's Camera Shop is near 
by to supply you with film for 
your camera. 

A wide range of beneficial 
services are offered by Massey's. 
They sell film for any type of 
camera and can handle the 
development. They also offer a 
complete line of lenses, light 
meters, and special effects aids. 
For those who wish to improve 
their skill or learn the latest 
techniques, Massey's provides 
a large selection of literature 
on photography and special 
effects. Finally, they 
particularly help the William 
and Mary student by offering a 
discount on photographic 
equipment and aids. So, the 
next time a particular scene or 
atmosphere beckons, or a few 
friends are together, be pre- 
pared with film and equipment 
from Massey's Camera Shop. 



TAIT, JULIA, Ft. Bliss, TX. 
TALBOTT, FRANK, Alexandria. 
TANG, STEPHEN, Wilmington, DE 
TAPPAN, CHARLENE, Danbury, CT 
THOMAS, NANCY, Richmond. 
THOMPSON, RHONDA, New Kent. 



TILLERY, MARY, Hampton. 
TOUSSAINT. KATHY, Manila, 

Philippines. 
TREFZGER, ELIZABETH, The 

Plains. 
TREVEY, LISA, Lynchburg. 
TRIMBLE. .JOHN,' Hot Springs. 
TRUSKETT, OLENNA, Yorktown. 



UEBERHORST. SUSAN, Arlington. 
UNG, NANCY, Alameda, CA. 
UPPERCO, ANN, Arlington. 
UTT, SHERRY, Middlebrook. 
VALENTI, MONIQUE, Falls Church. 
VARKER, SUSAN, Chesapeake. 



VASELECK, JAMES, Nokesville. 

VAUGHAN, P.-SiTRICIA, Chesapeake. 

VAYVADA, MARSHA, Charlottes- 
ville. 

VERA, KRISTI, Arlington. 

VICK, CYNTHIA, Courtland. 

WAGNER, KELLY, Phoenixville, 
PA. 



.392/Freshmen 




CAMERA SHOP 



»»»♦♦»♦», ,»,,,,,,,,^,,^^^ 



♦♦♦♦«*** 




WALKER, CATHERINE, Galax. 
WALKER, EPHFROM, Glen Allen. 



WALTON, JILL, Newport News. 
WARD, JULIE, Roanoke. 



WARD, LAUREN, Falls Church. 
WATSON, ELLEN, Oakton. 



WAUFORD, JENNIFER, Springfield. 
WEILER, CHRISTINE, Farmingdale, 

NY. 



WEISENBURGER, SUE, Vienna. 
WESTBROOKE, PAMELA, Jacksonville 

FL. 
WETMORE, CAROL, Haddon Heights, 

NJ. 



WHEATLEY, THOMAS, Dunn Loring. 
WHITE, DIANE, Amsterdam, NY. 
WHITE, ERNEST, Chesapeake. 
WHITE, KAREN, Virginia Beach. 
WHITWORTH, KATHRYN, Charlottes- 
ville. 
WIGGERT, SARAH, Blacksburg. 



WIGGINS, JOANNE, Arlington. 
WILLIAMS, ELIZABETH, Beaver, 

PA. 
WILLIAMS, NANCY, Chesapeake. 
WINEGAR, KRISTINE, Franklin 

Lakes, NJ. 
WINTER, CATHERINE, Springfield. 
WISNIEWSKI, REGINA, Sterling. 



WOOLLEY, JILL, Richmond. 
WORTMAN, LAURA, Charlotte, NC. 
WRAY, GREGORY, Alexandria. 
WRIGHT, AMY, Cinnaminson, NJ. 
WUNDERLICH, KENNETH, Fairfax. 
YEAGER, JOANNE, Norfolk. 



YERLY, RAYMOND, Midlothian. 
YOUNG, LAWRENCE. Richmond. 
YOUNG. PATRICIA, Richmond. 
ZABOROWSKI, ANNAMARIE. Ann- 

andale. 
ZANETTI, LISA, Virginia Beach. 
ZIMMERMAN, DAWN, Silver Spring, 

MD. 



Freshmen/393 



If. If. )f. if. If. 



GRAD PROFILE 



BRADSHAW, NANCY, Norge. 



DELANO, ROBERT, Warsaw. 



DEMIRANDA, RAQUEL, Brazil. 



FULLER, SANDY, Salem. 



JOYCE, BENJAMIN, Richmond. 



***** 



****** 




. ^f ou get two things from 
-^ Law school," asserted 
Donald Gregory, "the ability 
to analyze facts, recognizing 
general legal rights, duties, 
and conflicts, and a piece of 
paper allowing you to take the 
bar exam." To Donald, the 
student must depend on his 
own efforts to attain these; 
it was not a function of the 
particular law school. Citing 
this view, Donald pointed out 
one determining factor in his 
decision to pursue law at 
William and Mary: "All things 
being otherwise equal, Marshall- 
Wythe had the lowest tuition 
of any Virginia law school." 

As well as studying law, 
Donald was a patent agent, 
admitted to practice before 
the patent bar of the U.S. 
Patent and Trademark Office. 
Noting that patent agents and 
attorneys must have both 
scientific and legal back- 
grounds, he fulfilled the 
second of these requirements 
by attaining his B.S. in 



****** 



******* 



394/Graduate-Law 



***** 



**************************** 



******** 



******* 





LOUD, KEVIN, Santa Barbara, CA. 




MC LARTY, WILLIAM, Cumberland, 
MD. 



HIS TEN-YEAR-OLD MOTORCYCLE claims 
much of Donald Gregory's spare time. 



Nuclear Engineering and work- 
ing for three years as an 
engineer specializing in 
commercial nuclear reactor 
fuel design. 

Donald had many long-term 
ambitions. He hoped to start 
"a business providing quality 
insurance services for health 
care patients, a commercial 
stable, a motorcycle repair 
shop, and maybe a small law 
practice on the side." 

Grad students often found 
themselves subjected to queries 
requesting comparison between 
their undergraduate and gradu- 
ate programs. Graduating from 
the University of Virginia in 
1973, Donald willingly made one 
observation, "You can find just 
about anything you want at Wil- 
liam and Mary if you look hard 
enough, but because of its lar- 
ger size, you can find a lot 
more of it at UVA." 
****************** 




PAGE, ALEXIS, Williamsburg. 



TARKENTON, JEFFREY, Portsmouth. 



^^\ 




VON HAUG, PETER, Chautauqua, NY. 



Graduate-Law/39.5 



****************** 



* * * it * 



CELLAR ON 



ANDERSON, PAUL, Williamsburg 
ASQUINO, CHERYL, Riverside, RL 
BALTZ, FRANK, Williamsburg 
BANE, PHILIP, Fairfax. 
BASHAM, JACK, Lynchburg. 
BASKETT, CYNTHIA, Virginia 
Beach. 



BATES, AL, Richmond. 
BAUMAN, MICHAEL, Suitland, MD 
BECKER, FRED, Louisville, KY. 
BEAMAN, NATHANIEL, Norfolk. 
BLANTON, RICHARD, Farmville. 
BLISH, NELSON, Williamsburg. 



BRAY, WILLIAM, Williamsburg. 
BOURASSA, JANINE, Williamsburg. 
BRESENOFF, MARC, Norfolk. 



BRITTIN, MICHAEL, Great Falls. 
BROAS, TIMOTHY, Williamsburg. 
BROOKE-DEVLIN, SLOAN, Norfolk. 



BROWN, KATHY, Woodbridge. 
BROWN, PETER, Williamsburg. 
BRUNICK, KEVIN, Virginia Beach. 



BUCKLEY, BRIAN, Vienna. 
BURNS, JAMES, Williamsburg. 
COX, CARROLLYN, Virginia 
Beach. 



CRANDLEY, JOHN, Norfolk 
CYPHERS, CHRISTIE, Williams- 
burg. 
DA VIES, JOHN, Lynchburg. 



DAVIS, LARRY, Adrian, MI. 
DE BOER, JAY, Petersburg. 
DUNLOP, JANET, Williamsburg. 
EASON, WARD, Windsor. 
ELLIOTT, ELWOOD, Richmond. 
FIELDS, WILLIAM, Arlington. 



FLEMING, RICHARD. Williamsburg 
FORSMAN. PAUL. Lincroft, NJ. 
FOSTER, JUDITH, Fairfax. 
FRIES, JAY, Lexington. 
GEROE, KEN, Virginia Beach. 
GERRITY, BRUCE, Tinton Falls, 
NJ. 




396/Graduate-Law 



THE SQUARE 



******* 



************************ 




GIBSON, JOAN. Virginia Beach. 
GIFFORD. DAVID. Media. PA. 
GIGUERE. MICHAEL. Newport News. 
GILLETTE. MICHELLE. Springfield. 
GREGORY. DONALD. Williamsburg. 
GROOME, LINDA. Newport News. 



HAASE, DENNIS. Roanoke. 
HAGANS. ROBERT. Virginia Beach. 
HARRIS, MARGED, Williamsburg. 
HARRIS, ROBERT. Lvnchburg. 
HARRIS. WELFORD. Bon Air. 
HEDRICK. KAREN. Annandale. 



* ****************** 

Entertainment is just around 
the corner and down the stairs 
at Cellar on the Square. There 
the William and Mary student 
can relax and enjoy himself 
after a day or week of tests, 
papers, and classes. 

Cellar on the Square has all 
the ingredients to make a good 
time: appealing atmosphere, 
good music, dancing, and a 
variety of mixed drinks. The 
student can dance to the sounds 
of well-known area dance bands 
or unwind to the music of folk 
singers. Or. the student can 
just sit and enjoy the many 
mixed drinks available. 

Weekends or week nights no 
longer need to be a time of 
boredom or frustration. With 
Cellar on the Square, the 
student can find all the ingredients 
of a real "night out". So 
come on down to Cellar on the 
Square where good times are in 
the making. 

THE LIVE ENTERTAINMENT at Cellar 
on the Square produces excellent tunes 
to boogey down with. 



****** 



****** 



HEPPLER. WES. Battle Creek, 

MI. 
HILL. CAROL. Klamath Falls. OR. 
HIXON. JAMES. Fort Monroe. 
HOLMES. EMANUEL. Roanoke. 
HORN. THOMAS. Hilton Head. SC. 
HUENNEKENS. KEVIN. Williamsburg. 



HUNTER. KATHLEEN. Meadville, 

PA. 
JENKINS. BARRY. Chesapeake. 
JENNINGS. GRAHAM. Williamsburg. 
JOHNSON. CATHERINE-SYLWA. 

Hampton. 
KARCH. BEVERLY. Westwood, NJ. 
KENNEDY. KAREN. Fredericksburg. 



Graduate-Law/397 



»♦»»»♦»»♦♦»»»•»»♦♦» 



BASKIN-ROBBINS 



KERN, NANCY, Williamsburg. 
KESSLER, LEONARD, Ridgefield, 

CT. 
KINSEY, CARROL, Cumberland. 
KINSEY, CHANDA, Fairfax. 
KNAUSS, THOMAS, Fairfax. 
LACY, MASON, Williamsburg. 



LASKY, MICHAEL, Norfolk. 
LEWIS, JAMES, Bowling Green. 
LIPTAK, ROBERT, Williamsburg. 
LYON, GEORGE, Richmond. 
MAJETTE, ROBERT, Richmond. 
MARX, CAROL, Virginia Beach. 



For you, only the best 
will do. And when you 
want the best in ice cream, 
you choose Baskin-Robbins over 
all others. The flavors, whe- 
ther Lime Sherbert or Choco- 
late Fudge, are made with the 
best ingredients. No matter what 
you order — a triple dip cone of 
Rocky Road, French Vanilla, 
and Caramel Fudge, or a hot 
fudge sundae — you are in 
for a taste treat. Baskin- 
Robbins ice cream is some- 
thing to anticipate. 

The next time studying be- 
comes too tedious, or the 
thought of a candy bar is 
boring, or you are just in 
the mood for a good, cold ice 
cream cone, walk on over to 
Baskin-Robbins. They can sa- 
tisfy any desire with their 
unusual variety of ice cream 
flavors, milkshakes, sundaes, 
mud pies, and cakes. If you 
crave the best, you choose 
Baskin-Robbins. 

KELVIN RAMSEY DELVES into a double 
dip of his favorite flavors at B&R. 




*******^^*********^,^,1,1,^,1,^,^r^,*1,^,^,i,^,^,^,^,^,^,^,^,^, 




************itii*i,^i,*i,i,i,i,i,i,i,^^,^,^, 



********* 



MC BRIDE, NANCY, Norfolk. 
MC BRIDE, TERESA, Jackson, NJ 
MC CORMICK, KEVIN, Manhasset 

Hills, NY. 
MC CULLA, CLARE, McLean 
MC CULLOUGH, EDWARD, Fairfax 
MC NEW, R. BRUCE, Wilmington, 

DE. ^ 



MILLER. DARRELL, Newport News 
MOOREMAN. CLAUDE, Savannah. GA 
MORRIS. E. R. Ill, King George. 
MORRISON, ANN, Dover, NJ 
MUMM, FREDERICK, Williamsburg. 
MURRAY, JAMES, Arlington. 



398/Graduate-Law 




* * * * * 



****** 



***** 




1^^ (9 © O (v| 



***************** 







**«****«***««•**♦« ^v 1 o%» ^'^h^ 






MYERS, RANDOLPH, Alexandria. 
NEAL, PAUL, Strasburg. 
NORTON, WILLIAM, Williamsburg. 
NUCKOLS. MICHAEL. Chesapeake. 
PALMER, WALTER, Denton, MD. 
PEDERSON, BRUCE, Annadale. 



PERRY, DAVID, Williamsburg. 
PICKARD, RICHARD, San Francisco, 

CA. 
RAE, ROBERT, Virginia Beach. 
RAPAPORT, ROBERT, Norfolk. 
REILLY, WILLIAM, Jackson 

Heights, NY. 
ROADCAP, STEVEN, Williamsburg. 



ROBINSON, WILLIAM, Winchester. 
ROGERS, JOHN, Alexandria. 
ROLLINS, MARTHA, Norfolk. 



SANTORO, FRANK, Newport News. 
SCHAFRANN, RICHARD, Scarsdale, 

NY. 
SIBILLA, GUY, Vienna. 



SMALLEY, EDWARD, Berrvville. 
SMITH, CRAIG H., William'sburg. 
SMITH, CRAIG J., Easton, PA. 



SMITH, REBECCA, Norfolk. 
SNYDER, ELIZABETH, Alexandria. 
SOBERICK, MICHAEL, Norfolk. 



STASSUN, DOROTHY. Fairfield, 

CT. 
STATON, GWYN, Alexandria. 
STRICKLER, ROBIN, McLean, 



STUART, MICHAEL, Williamsburg. 
SUSSER, PETER, Brooklyn, NY. 
SWATLIN, BARBARA, Flv Creek, 

NY. 
TAYLOR, C. WAYNE, Louisa. 
THOMAS, WILLIAM, Norfolk. 
THURMAN, ANDREW, Oklahoma Citv, 

OK. 



TROIA, SUSAN, Fall River, MA. 
VAUGHAN, WILLIAM, JR., Virginia 

Beach. 
WEST, JOCELYN, McLean. 
WHITEHURST, COLIN, Chesapeake. 
WILLIFORD, RHONDA, Sterling 

Park. 
WOOLRIDGE, ROBERT, Quinton. 



Graduate-Law/399 




400/Index 



A 



Aaron, Nancy Grace 296 
Abbey. Ellen Faye 296 
Abbott. Barbara Diane 378,195 
Abbott, Jan Laberteauz 
Abdella, Stephen Martin 222 
Abdulrahman, Ridzwan Bin 
Abernathy. Sue Ellen 296.203 
Abey. Jr.. Bernard Earl 
Abramczyk, Robert 
Abrams, Marc Laurence 
ACADEMICS 70 
Ackerman, Nancv Leona 364,126, 

192 
Ackerman. Warren Keith 296 
Ackerson. DouelaB 
Acora, Carroll Leroy 296 
Adams, Annette Veronica 
Adams. Jr.. Earl B. 
Adams, Elizabeth Rector 
Adams, Gregory Scott 166,222 
Adams, Gwendolyn Patricia 296 
Adams. Jennifer Sheree 364 
Adams, John Dickenson 225 
Adams, Lisa Lynn 
Adams. Mary Beverly 
Adams, Michael Carey 
Adams, Sharon Lee 
Adama. Teresa M. 296 
Adams. Wanda Bonita 
Adinolfi, Justin John 
Adkins. Carla Fay 2% 
Adkins, Kent Lavalle 378 
Adler. Kenneth Jay 296 
Adlis, Debra Sue 203 
ADMINISTRATION 56 
Adzemovic. Radivoje 348 
Agee, Gayle Elizabeth 195 
Agnew, Catherine Ann 
Ahamed, Karim Haiderali 296. 

107.135,109 

Aiistock, Robin Shelley 296. 

196,197 
Ailsworth, Karen Sue 348 
Aitken, Robert Christopher 213, 

217,216,291,273 
Akerbietm Laura Anne 378 
Akridge. Melanie Jove 296 
Albert, Susan Margaret 364 
Alderson. Nancy Blanche 
Aldrich, Maiy Joy 348 
Aldrich. Susan Povthress 296. 

108 
Aldrich. Warren Edward 249 
Alesai. Michael Joseph 
Alexander, Alice Anne 
Alexander. Gregory Creason 296 
Alexander. Stacy Ann 378 
Alford. Frances Horton 
Alford. Grace Elizabeth 378 
Alford, Timothy John 230 
Aliperti, Jamie Britton 
Allen, Cathy Micbele 296,107 

108,109,284 
Allen, Douglas Dewey 
Allen. Emily Diane 296 
Allen, Jr., Robert Shaw 364,127 
Allen, Stephen Timothy 
Allen, Virginia Dawn 195 
Allen. Virginia Jane 
Allen, William C. 
Allessi, Lilia Talavera 
Aliev. Judy Leigh 296,204 
Alley, Neil Randolph 219 
Allin, Catherine Ann 296 
Alluisj, Jean Elizabeth 364 
Almy, Laura Wnght 364,204 
ALPHA CHI OMEGA 192-193 
ALPHA PHI ALPHA 212-213 
ALPHA PHI OMEGA 120 
Alt, Charles A. 
Alvarez, Adriana Juliette 250 
Aroato, Susan Lynn 
Amava, Lisa Marie 378,195 
Ambler, Jr.. Robert Riles 378 
Ambrosiano, John J. 131 
Amee, Heidi Joanna 378 
Ames, Matthew Charles 348 
Ammirati, Gregory 
Amo, Craig Lewis 
Amstutz, Mark Christian 
Amt, Emilie Margaret 378 
Andaluz, Loyda 
Andersen, Adam Arthur 
Anderson, Brice Tilden 147.348 
Anderson, Celia Anne 348 



Anderson, Gary F. 
Anderson, Glenn Edward 296.267 
Anderson. JeSrey Pierce 
Anderson. Kath^e Paige 364 
Anderson. Kenneth Ray 108 
Anderson. Linda Jean 348.107. 

192,242 
Anderson, Pandie Deete 
Anderson, Paul Richard 396 
Anderson. Robin Beth 296.192 
Anderson. Sheryl June 348 
Anderson, Stepnen Carl 348, 

136.226 
Anderson, Susan Marie 232 
Anderson. William Mark 283 
Anderson, Willie C. 
Andino. Mark Richard 230 
Andresen, Nancy Foster 
Andrews, David Ranier 
Andrews, Eleanor Erwin 348 
Andrews. Frederick George 
Andrews, Jr., James Richard 348. 

135.226 
Andrews, Jr.. Richard Frank 
Angle. Kathryn Elizabeth 348 
Angle, Keith Matthew 
Angstadt, Curt David 
Anikeeff, Anthony Hotchkias 
Ansbro. Thomas Michael 285 
Antinori. Katherine Anne 348 
Antle, Nancv Gail 210 
Antonacci, Carol Marie 296 
Antoniou, Ted Costas 
Anzmann, Marcia Dawn 364,208 
Apodaca, Patricia 
Apostolou, Gregory John 
Apostolou. Micnael Phillip 219, 

291 
Appel, Richard Michaels 
Arai, Maya 378 
Arango, Ignacio Enrique 415, 

348 
Arata, James Francis 
Arata, Stephen David 
Arato, Victoria Louise 
Arberg, Charles Swayne 
Archer. Sharon Jane 
Ardis. David Mark 
Armbrist«r, Sarah Gaye 378 
Armbruster, William Rodney 278 
Armel, HI. Lyle Oliver 
Armendaris, Mark Anthony 220 
Armstrong, Christopher Robert 

348 
Armstrong, Jerolyn Dorothea 
Armstrong, Liane Rene 
Armstrong, Tracev Taliaferro 

378,195 
Army, Warren H. 
Arnold, Amy Downing 378 
Arnold, Carol Ann 296,206,108, 

109 
Amot, Susan Eileen 296.20,114. 

208 
Aron, Marcus Jay 
Ascunce. Hilda Isabel 378 
Ascimce, Jorge 
Aehby, Jr., Albert Robert 378 
Ashby, Gayle Lynette 
Ashby. Molly Frances 197,277 
Ashby, Susan Laflesh 
Ashford. Philip Charles 296 
Ashman, James Frederick 
Ashooh. Pet«r William 297, 

131,190 
Ashworth. Carol Ann 348 
Askew, n. Karl Wesley 
Asquino, Cheryl Anne 396 
Aatin, Dolly Ann 348 
Atkins, Teresa Lyim 268 
Atkins. William Mark 
Atkinson, Deirdre Renee 364. 

192 
Aud, Jr., Thomas Francis 
Austin, Jr.. Alvis Gerald 297,108 
Austin, Susan Belle 361 
Averette, Alice Maree 297.107, 

109 
Avery, Steven Leo 
Aviles. John Matthew 297 
Awer, Heather Yvonne 
Ayash, Jaime Giro 297 
Avers, Nancy Jane 
Ayres. Douglas Keneth 109 



B 



Babb. Tenence EUion 297.270 



Baber, Alexander Powhatan 
Babiera. Joae Carlo 
Bachmao, Glenn Stewart 
Back, David Bishop 
Backus. Lois A. 
Bade. Douglas Michell 261 
Badger, Mark Lee 131 
Badzgon. James Raymond 267 
Baer. William E. 
Bagbey, Francis Cocke 
Bagby. Elizabeth Courtney 
Bage. Jr., Wilson Seawall 
Bagley. Pattie Hargrave 297, 

195 
Bahlmar. Cindy 364 
Bailey, Barbara Ellen 
Bailey. Darryl Alexander 
Bailey. Elizabeth Anne 
Bailey. Elizabeth Spencer 210 
Bailev, Marsha Lee 
Bailey, Mary.Paula 297,21 1 
Bailey. Maty Elizabeth 364 
Bailey. Jr.. Robert Milton 348 
Bailev, Roberta Davis 364,204 
Bailey, Jr.. Roger Millon 213 
Bailey, Suzanne Lee 298 
Bain. Donna Lyn 378.12,S 
Bain. Nancy Katherme 298.125 
Bair. Clayton H. 
Baird, Deborah Anne 
Baird, Sarah Clark 378.210 
Baird. Sarah Katherine 264 
Baker, Catherine Ann 298 
Baker, Diane Elizabeth 378 
Baker, m, Henry Harold 298, 

267 
Baker, Kathryn Louise 298 
Baker. Margaret Patricia 
Baker, Randolph Marshall 
Baker, Jr„ Richard L. 
Bakewell, Jeffrey Scott 
Baklarz, Benjamin Keith 239, 

190,228,229 
Balbo, Debra Joan 
Balcer, Marc Joel 378 
Baldt. Kimberly Ann 378 
Balducci, Debra Lynn 
Ball, David Ernest 
Bail, Stephen E. 298,217 
Ball. Wendy Anne 
Ballard, Charlotte Dawn 278 
Ballard. Donald Wesley 
Ballou, Roger Ashman 
Baltes, Elizabeth Valintine 
Baltz, Francis James 396 
Bane, Philip Howard 396 
Banks, Andrew Cy 239,228 
Banks, Bonnie Alwilda 
Banks, Jr., John Robert 
Banks, Pauline Boyd 
Banks, Sarah Louise 348 
Banwell, Sharon Kay 
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION 46 
Barbae, Nancy Elizabeth 364 
Barber, Jr., George Raymond 
Barbour, Christopher 298,28 
Bare, Jr., Keith Robert 
Barfield, Charles Thomas 
Barham IV, Samuel Dewey 364 
Barham, Thomas Dale 
Barker, Albert Penick 
Barker. Daniel Paul 
Barlow. Christine Marie 
Barlow, Thomas Owen 
Barnard, Steven Cutler 
Barnes, Beth Ellyn 348,126 
Barnes, Cynthia Ruth 
Barnes, Eric Richard 239, 

219,290 
Barnes, Judy A. 
Barnes, William Jefferson G. 

Barnes. William Joseph 257, 

Bamett. WiUiam Kinne 348 
Baroni. Dorian Patrizia 
Barov, Brian Franklin 
Barr, Anne Maureen 
Barr, Paul Kingsley 
Barr, Stephen Joseph 
Barranger, Phillip Kyle 
Barrett, Carter Darden 364 
Barrett, Michael Jeffrey 
Barrett, Valerie Lvnn 348 
Barron, Anna FeweU 298,195, 

109 
BaiTosse, Colombia De Los 

Angeles 364 
Barrow. Gregory' Stephen 299. 



Bartley. Barbara Jean 
Battnicki IH, Stephen 213.216 
Bartolutti, Sandra Jean 
Barton, John Edwin 
Barton, Kathleen Victoria 168 
Barton. Kenneth G. 
Barwick. Cindi Lee 197 
Basham. .Ir., Jack Calhoun 
Baskclt, CjTilhiB Karen .396 
Baskett, Laurie Lynn 
Baskin, .lonathan Bizzetl 
Bnaney. Barbara Joann 348.195 
Bass. Joel Steven 
Bass. Kenneth Bryan 
Bass. Sharon Denise 
Basta. Gwendolyn Dee 
Bataller. Neal 
Batchelor. Joyce Lvnn 299.261. 

108 
Batoman, Marv Lee 200,264 
Bates, Alfred William 396 
Bal«9, Campbell Rilev 230 
Bates, Jeffrey .loscph 349 
Bates. Nancy Lvnn 378 
Bathe. Ellen Towner 
Battaglia, Mark Vincent 
Baum, Robert Stephen 
Baumann, Msrvann 
Baumann. Michael Edward 396 
Baumgartner, Katherine Marie 
Bautaw, Jeness L. 
Baxter, WiUiam James 
Baylis, Jamie Gayle 364,148, 

195,415,109 
Bazzani, Phillip Nicolas 
Beach. Charles Stephen 299 
Beahm. Linda Sue 349,45 
Beales, Randolph Allen 378,124 
Beam, Lee Ann 
Beaman IV, Nathaniel 396 
Bean, Meredith Lee 299 
Beard, Diane Marie 299 
Beaty, Charles Arend 
Beaudry, Jeannette Marie 
Beaumont, Siuarme Marie 
Becherer, Jack John 
Beck, Joni Carter 197 
Beck, Linda Lou 349 
Beck, Marjorie Helen 299, 

192,193,226 
Becker, Colleen G. 
Becker, Jr.. Fred Reinhardt 396 
Becker. Ross Kermedy 349 
Beckett. Susan Kay 
Backhouse, EUzabeth R. 
Beckman. Margaret L. 
Beckman. Michelle Ann 
Bedell. Michael Eugene 246 
Beedy. Alison Brooke 
Behlmar, Cindv Lee 
Beil, Clark Raymond 364 
Bekkedahl, Carolyn 
Belcher. Sharon Kay 378 
Bell, Alison 299 
Bell. Jr., Benjamin Harrison 
Bell, Christopher Duncan 267 
Bell, Emily 349 
Bell, John S. 

Bell, Katherine Frazer 364 
Bell. Katherine Vee 299 
Bell, Thomas Lyndon 299.107 
Bell. William Arthur 
Bellamy, Lisa Lyrui 349 
Belote. Mary Murphy 
Belsha. Elizabeth Haskins 364 
Bender. Audrey Lynn 364 
Bender, Christopher Joseph 
Benedict, Mitchell Peter 349, 

136,225 
Benenaon, Esther Lynn 378 
Benesh, Patricia Jean 364 
Ben ham, Robin Elaine 349 
Beninafo. Terri Gay 
Benjamin. Christian Robert 378, 

2a3 
Benner, David A, 
Benner, William Arthur 228 
Bennett, Deborah Elizabeth 349, 

204 
Bennett, Donald Richard 299 
Bennett. Kimberly Dean 
Bennett. Stephen Marshall 
Bennett, Steven Edgar 
Bennett, Todd Napier 378 
Bensch, Christopher Lynn 
Bentel, Barbara Lynn 
Bentlev. Nora Jane 299,192 
Benlun, Anne Arthur 378,210 
Benton. Jr. Kenneth Roberts 

219 
Berdan. Gerald Berkley 
Berdy. Jerome Albert 299 
Berele. Brian Marc 
Berg, Karin Kay 364 
Berger, Judith Ann 299 
Berger, Jr., Theodore John 2.53. 

283 
Bergeron, Lynn Michele Evans 



Bergmann. Richard Charles 
Berliner. Joel Keith 
Berman. Julie Ellen 107,136 
Bermudes, Jr., Ralph Donald 
Bernhardt, Susan Ann 364 
Bernick, Croie Hamilton 
Berry, John Tinslev 364,323 
Berry, Leslie Marie 299,248 
Berrv, Susan Elizabeth 
Berry, Wendol Elizabeth 264 
Borthiaume, Denise Lord 299 
Bertolet, Beverly S, 364 
Bcscherer, Karen Elizabeth 200 
Beakenis, Sharon Otero 
Bess, Kathv Renee 364 
Best, Keith 239 
Beat, Lisa Kevin 364,210 
Bettendorf. Valerie Maria 349, 

203 
Bcttge. Paul William 230 
Betz. George 349 
Beveridge. Peter William 
Beverly. Carol Craig 299 
Bcvington. Dierdre Theresa 
Beyrouty, Grace Louise 
Bice, Karen Lynne 
Bidwell, Virginia Leigh 
Bieri, Susan 349 
Billet, Barrv David 215 
BiUell, Todd Evans 
Bitodeau, James Nolin 
Bilodeau. Mary Theresa 201,200 
Binari, Steven Charles 299 
Bingham, Brendan William 
Binsley, Andrew William 
Binzer. Carol Dorothy 364 
Binzer. Ellen Marie 
Binzer, Randall Henry 378 
BIOLOGY CLUB 125 
Birch, Anne 
Birch, Paiti Jo 349,200 
Bircher, Elizabeth Ellen 
Bird, Melissa Lee 349 
Birdsong, Cathy Lynn 
Birkhoff, Neil Vincent 
Bish, Sharon Marie 
Bishop, Beth Franklin 299,208 
Bishop, Deborah Ann 210 
Bishop, Jr.. WilUam Branch 
Bittner, Ann S. 
Black, Jr.. John Thomas 
Black. Pamela Ann 299 
Blackburn. David Allen 299.239 
Blackburn. Michael Robert 217 
Blackman. Douglas Edward 299. 

226 
BLACK STUDENTS ORGAN- 
IZATION 116 
Blackwell. Angela M. 
Blackwell. Anna Trible 349.192 
Blain. Cynthia Paige 378 
Blair. Benjamin Lane 
Blair. Gem Ellen 300 
Blair, Joseph Miles 
Blair. Karen Lussen 
Blair. Nancy LawTence 
Blanchard. Linda Kay 
Blanchard. Richard Eugene 
Blank. Marilyn Elizabeth 378, 

208 
Blankenbaker, Kimberly 300,389 
Blankenship, Eric Vaughn 
Blanks, Mark Turner 
Blanock. Lisa 364,197 
Blanlon, Amy Ellen 
Blanlon, ,Iohn Wntkins 349 
Blanton, Richard Swoope 396 
Blasberg, Eric W8.yne 
Btasco. Pamela Gave 
Blauvell. Heidi Mae 
Blaylock HI. Robert A. 
blazev. Carol Ann Sovine 
Bledsoe. Teresa .lean 300,108 
Blevins. Carol Ann 378 
Blish, Nelson Adrian 396 
Blood, Peter Stuart 349 
Bloom, John l..an8ing 109 
Bloomer, Brenda Sue 378 
Bloeser, Tamara Kay 349,200 
Blows, David Wayne ,378,287 
Blue, Jana ,364 
Blue, Patricia Anne 
Blueweiss, .leffrey Alon 
BOARD OF STLIDENT 

AFFAIRS 140 
BoBtright. Geortc Francis 378 
Bobb, Susan Elizabeth 378,200 
Bobbitt, Turman Curlia 
Bi>denheiroer, Susan Grace 364 
Bodenner, Becky Ann 
Bodie, Ellen ,300.195 
Bodnar, Mark Richard 
Boehlert, Garry Richard 
Boehling, Janice EUine .IW, 

204,281 
Boek, Sandra Jean 
Bogwe Betty Carol 



Indes/401 



Bohannon, Harriet Marie 

Boles. Colleen Joy 

Boles. Myra Dare 197.242 

Boles, Ronald G. 

Bolick. Anita Lou 349,126,204 

Boll. Charles John 

Boil, Pamela G. 

BoUing, Anne Dale 349 

Bolte, Caroline Blandford 206, 

414.415.364.109 
Bonaventura, Benjamin Joseph 
Bond. CaroliTi Lee 379 
Bond. Margaret Alan 379.192 
Bonn, William L. 
Bonner, Kathleen Mary 379 
Borchers, Susan Jane 
Borden, Douglas Crane 267,270 



271 



well 



BomBtein, Peter Hai 
Boros, William J. 
Boret, Donna 

Bortner. Peter Ernest 300,124 
Bosheara, Kevin 364 
BosKinski, Thomas Andrew 
Boss, Mary Helen 349 
Bostancic, Margret Ann 194,195 
Bostic. Patti Gail 300 
Bostwick, Alice Kathryn 
Boudreau, Lisa Callaway 
Bourassa, Janine M. 396 
Bourdon, Linda S. 
Bourgeois, Charles Thomas 249 
Bova, Carol Angaleen 197 
Bovoso, Victoria Ariene 272 
Bowen. Donald John 349 
Bowen. Kenneth Wayne 256,259 
Bowen. Lu AnneUe 300,195 
Bowen, Margaret Anne 
Bowen. Margaret Carole 300,248 
Bowen, Sharon Jo 364,210 
Bowers, George Heinrich 364 
Bowers, Katharine Stuart 349 
Bowies, Mary Allison 379 
Bowles, Rebecca R. 
Bowlin. Elizabeth Jean 
Bowman, Angela Charlene 379 
Bowman HI, John Imrie 301,215 
Bowman, Rebecca Anne 301,126, 

275 
Bowman, Rosemary Lynn 
Bowman, Sallie Wirt 
Boyce, Janet Dolores 379,197, 

Boyd, Bobby Thomas 259 
Boyd, Everett Morgan 20.263 
Boyd, Felicia Michelle 304 
Boyd, Janet Elizabeth 349,210 
Boyd, Janice Marie 
Boyd. Marv Elizabeth 349,195 
Boyd, Vincent Terrell 349 
Boyer, Joseph Nelson 
Boyer, Vanessa Dan 
Boykin, Timothy Wilson 
Boyle. Dorothy Jean 301 
Boyle. Mary Beth 365 
Bozicevic. Ann 

Braddish. Kevin Robert 29,273 
Bradley. Eleanor Norton 
Bradley, Frances Louise 365,128 
Bradley. Jean Willoughbee 349, 

206 
Bradshaw, Brian Thomas 
Bradshaw, Dana Seward 
Bradshaw, Michael Keith 301. 

219.109 
Bradshaw, Nancy Elizabeth 394 
Bradshaw. Stephen Mark 349 
Bradv, Christopher Robin 278 
Brady, Julie Anne 349 
Brady. Pamela Lee 379 
Braeden, Theresa Louise 349,210 
Bragg, Randy Lowell 301 
Brammer, Janell Guinn 365 
Brand, Deborah Huntiev 349.206, 

108 
Brandt, Ann 349 
Brandt, Barbara 
Brandt. David Matthew 
Brandt. Mark Ernst 291 
Branigan, Sean Flvnn 236 
Branecom, Georgia Kay 301,242, 

108 
Brfinscom, Joel Robert 
Brantley, John Davis 301.226 
Branvoid. Dwight Nels 
Brasset, Robert EMward 
Braun. Thomas Gerard 301,108. 

263 
Braun er, Steven Lewis 
Braunstein, Martin Alan 222 
Bray, Jr., Francis John 246 
Bray, William Bradford 396 
Breckenridge, Vivian B. 
Breedlove, Nancy Rose 197 
Brennan, Judith Marie 
Brennan. Mary Elizabeth 365, 

200.255 
Brenner. Charles S. 



Bresee, Linda Ann 301,206 
Bresenoff, Marc Robert 396 
Brevig, Lorraine Jan 
Brewer IV, Edward Neal 
Brewer, Laura Leigh 379 
Brewer, Michael David 365,219 
Brewster, Geoi^ana Lynn 301. 

131,210 
Bridewell, Sherry Lynn 

Hazelwood 
Bridges, Barbara S. 
Brien, Sally Ann 
Briganti. William Robert 
Briggs, Nancy Garrett 365,203 
Brigham, John Erwin 
Brigida, Alan Scott 
Brink, Julie A. 379,210 
Brinkley, Robert Brenner 379 
Brissette, Karen Louise 349 
Britt, Jennifer Jackson 
Britt, Jr., Raymond Lrouis 
Brittain. Kimberly Ruth 379, 

268 
Britten, Tracy Ann 379 
Britrin, Michael D. 396 
Broaddus, Rebecca Ann 
Broaddus, Richard Alan 219 
Broadwater, Sharon Thompson 
Broadwell, Waverly David 232 
Broas, Timothy Michael 396 
Brock, Gail D. 
Brock in, Samuel Morton 
Brockenbrough, Willson 

WiUiams 379 
Brockman, William Philip 
Brockwell, Pattie Jean 301, 

206.207 
Brodell, Albert Peter 
Broderick, Craig Wyeth 
Brodeur, David 
Brodeur, Jeanne Frances 379 
Brokaw IE. John Garretson 
Brooke-Devlin, Sloan 396 
Brooke. Grace Lee 
Brooke. Thomas Willcox 379.124 
Brooks, Brian Gerard 301 
Brooks, Charlotte Leigh 
Brooks. Donna Lynn 
Brooks, Gabriele 
Brooke, Hugh A. 
Brooks m, Leonard 230,285 
Brooks, Mary Lee 365 
Brooks, Susan Dodds 
Brosnahan. Margaret Julia 365 
Brosnan, Mary Thekla 365 
Brough. Randy Mitchell 
Broughman. Raymond Lee 263 
Broughton, John Brooks 
Brown, Alison Mary 301 
Brown, Bruce A. 
Brown, Dan Thomas 365,230 
Brown, David Carl 127 
Brown, David Leroy 
Brown, Dorian Lynn 
Brown, Gerald James 301.109 
Brown, Hugh Etdridge 
Brown, Ian McLaren 
Brown HI, James Dall 
Brown. Jo Anna 
Brown, Kathleen Mitchell 349 
Brown, Kathy Ann 396 
Brown, Lesley Georgianne 349 
Brown, Lisa Ann 
Brown, Lori Denise 349 
Brown. Michael Clinton 239,217 
Brown. Nancy Jean 
Brown. Patricia Anne 379.197 
Brown, Peter Brent 396 
Brown, Randolph Thomas 365 
Brown. Richard Kent 349 
Brown, Jr., Robert Evera 301 
Brown, Russell Gayle 349 
Brown, Sidney Robin 379,124, 

415 
Brown. Steven Winthrop 
Brown. Susan Helann 272,277 
Brown, Susanah Branch 301 
Brown. Terence G. 
Brown, Walter Colby 
Brown, Wendy Ann 379 
Browning. Rebecca Welle 
Browning, Ten Leanne 301.206, 
207 



200 
Brubeck, Douglas McFadden 
Bruce, Nancv Clark 
Bruen, Kathleen Ann 200 
Bruening. Gary Alan 365,270 
Bruner. Eugene Rogers 253,283 
Bruni. Christine Yvonne 
Brunick, Kevin Michael 396 
Brunner. Deborah Kelley 
Bryan, Carolyn Byrd 203 
Bryan, Ralpti Timothy 
Bryan. Stanley Gatewood 230 
Bryan ID, William Walter 365, 



49,219 
Bryant, Anne Merle 365,124,377 
Bryant, Dorothy A. 
Bryant, Dorrie May 
Bryant, Douglas Nelson 
Bryant, Robert Harrison 301, 



Buchanan, John Michael 
Buchanan, Molly Frances 
Buchanan, Patricia Kay 365,192 
Buchanan, Stephanie Leigh 365, 

206 
Buchwalter, Marie Eleanor 379, 

197 
Buchwalter, Suzanne Louise 301 
Bucketew, Nell 
Buckius, Dean Taylor 365.235, 

109 
Buckley, Brian Langford 396 
Buckley, Colin Hugh 379,128 
Buckley, Karen Kennedy 
Buckley, Michael Joseph 
Buckner, Julie Laiu-en 349 
Budd, Karen Sue 379,204 
Budd, Stfiven William 
Buehler, Wendy Carroll 349 
Buell, Sandra 
Buffon. Kathleen Ann 30X 
Buffum, Carol Louise 
Buhrman, Martha Ann 301 
Buidain, Louis Stacy 
Bules, Raymond Thomas 
Bullock. Stephen William 
Bumgardner Ginnv Li 301,93, 

107,108,109 
Bundick, Carl Herman 
Buonassissi, Susan Grace 
Burch, Marv Elizabeth 
Burcher. Anthony Wayne 365,127 
Burdan, Laurie Arm 
Burgess, Martha Didinger 
Burgess, Michael Steven 
Burke, Ann Shepherd 365 
Burke, Eata Lyn Temple 365,203 
Buriie. John Connolly 
Burke, Kathleen Dunnavant 350, 

192 
Burlage, Stephen Mark 365 
Burnett, Melva F. 
Burnett, Stuart Rutledge 301, 

226 
Bumick, Daniel Jay 239 
Bums, James Joseph 396 
Bums, Martha Ann 301 
Bums, Susan Ellen 
Bums, Susan Lynn 
Burrell. Darryl Lee 283 
Burrell, Robert Alton 
Burroughs, James Nystrom 
Burt, Cbarl^ Ernest 
Burton, Joan Annette 
Busbin. Sharon Kay 302 
BuBch, Barbara Jean 302,206 
Bush, Jane Norwood 365 
Bushey, Julia Raye 379 
Busick, Ronald Lee 
Busser, Mary Sue 365,206 
Butler, George Edward 
Butler. R. Kenneth 365,235 
Butler, Scort Robertson 226 
Butler, Susan Lisbeth 
Butler, Thamer Denise 
Butler, Thomas Richard 
Buxton, Robert Leslie 302 
Byer, Pamela Lyim 365 
Byram. Amy Lynne 
Bynie, Joan S. 



c 



Cabe, CrisU Ruth 379.275 
Cabell, Robert B. 
Cade, David Sherman 379 
Cafferky, John Francis 
Cafferty, Bruce 239.228 
Cagley, Leslie Jo 365 
Cagley, Pamela Lyrm 
Canill, David Austin 
Caldwell, Clifford Douglass 
Caldwell. Michael Don 230 
Caldwell. Pamela Kay U4 
Caie, Franklin Foster 
Callahan, Patrick Scott 350,219 
Callas, George Dean 302 



Caliison. Susan Tyera 350,210 
Camacho, Jocelyn Ombac 379 
Camacho, Yvonne Maria 
Carobem, ThomM Maynard 302, 

127,108 
Cameron, Peter F. 
Camlin, Margaret Ceil 
Camp, Carrie Luanne 200 
Camp, William R. 
Campana. Jeffrey Scott 365.230 
Campbell, Alice Jane 379,210 
Campbell, Carol Montgomery 379 
Campbell, Claire Ann 350,250. 

272 
Campbell, Conrad Lawrence 
Campbell, Elizabeth Dudley 365 
Campbell, Glenn Clark 379 
Campbell, Heidi Lou 302 
Campbell IE, James Samuel 
Campbell, Joanne 379 
Campbell, Kathryn Lynn 302 
Campbell, Richard James 
Campbell, Stacey Robin 366 
Campbell, Todd Williams 350, 

225 



222 

Canino, Michael F. 
Cannon, John R. 
Cannon, Max Kent 
Canny, Michael Paul 
CANTERBURY ASSOCIATION 

46 
Canton, Cathy Louise 
Cantwell, Laurie Jean 
Carey, Michael James 
Carey, Virginia Anne 
Carey, William Leonard 
Carl, Myra Ann 
Carlin, Joseph Charles 
Carlson, Joyce Elizabeth 
Carlson H, Mason Randolph 
Carlston, Jr., Bruce Alexander 
Carlton, Helen Patrice 366 
Carlton, Jefirey George 
Carman. Laura Lynne 302,107, 

126.108,109 
Carmine, Jr., Frederick Thomas 
Camahan, Patrick Lynn 
Carney, Heath Joseph 108 
Carney, Stephen Patric 
Carpenter, Melanie Montague 
Carpenter, Thomas Woodley 
Carpenter, William Reed 263 
Carper, Joy 
Carper, Lisa Karen 
Carr, Gary Peyton 302 
Carr, Lisa Ann 380 
Carr. Jr., WiUiam H. 
Carrasco, Diane 
Carrazzone. Paul Frederic 350 
Carrick, Shaun Francis 
Carrico, Lisa 
Carrico, Margery 
Garrington, Dolores Marie 350 
Carrolt Cathleen 
Carroll, Clarence Edward 380, 

124 
Carroll, Laneva Feria 
Carroll. Robert Martin 
Carroll, Terence Richard 
Carroll, Thelma E. Young 
Garroll, Thomas P. 
Gatson, Beverley Anne 380,^3 
Caiison, Beverly Carol 
Carson, Thomas Frost 162 
Carter, Daniel Edward 302 
Carter, Jack Edward 380 
Carter, James Talmadge 302 
Carter, Margaret E. 
Carter. Marie Beth 302 
Carter, Mark Edward 
Carter. Jr., Richard Burke 
Carter. Timothy Robert 350,270 
Carver, Carole Ann 380 
Carver, Susan Worrall 195 
Carver, Wanda Jean 350 
Carwile, Nancy L>Tin 302 
Cary, Cornell Carrington 
Cary, Karen Faye 
Casale, Joan L. 
Casey. Brian Nelson 
Casey. Faith Shank 
Casey. Helen Elizabeth 
Casey, Robert Saugen 
Casey, Susan Kathleen 350 
Casper. Elaine Laveme 
Casper. Nelda Diane 302,126, 

250,109 
Cass HI, Edmund Francis 302 
Cassanos, Ellen 302,208 
Casson, Jr., Donald Davis 302, 

Casson, Mary Leslie 366,206 
Caster, Jana EstsUe 
Cathey, Karen Leigh 380 
CATHOLIC STUDENT ASSO- 



CIATION 47 
Catoe, Stephanie 350 
CaudiU. Marsha Jo 
Caufield. Mona Paige 302,108 
Cavell, Michael A. 
Cavros. Nick Geo;^e 225 
Cea, Kathy Ann 380 
Cecca, Christina Lynn 380 
Cerco, Carl F. 
Cerminara IB, John 239,228, 

247 
Cemy. Mark Eaton 380 
Cewe, John D. 302 
Chadek, Maiy Elizabeth 
Chadwell. Elaine 302 
Chaikin. Diane V. 
Chalkley, Theresa Ann 
Chamberlin, Catherine R, 
Chambers, Floyd A. 
Chamblee, Jr., Lindsey 

Bazemore 350 
Chan, Kar Yee 261 
Chan, Mary Jane 366,131 
Chan, Richard Monroe 
Chandler, Margaret Bennett 
Chang, Hui 

Chang, Hwey-Lain Surmy 
Charmon, Patricia Sugrue 
Chapman, Adrian PhiUp 302,222 
Chapman, Catherine Lee 366,197 
Chapman, Joan Marie 
Chappell, Jackson Layne 
Chappell, Karen Elizabeth 366 
Chappell, Stephen Charles 
Charity, Faye Lafam 
Charles, Barbara Boles 
Charles, Carol Jean 204 
Charlton. Leisa Carol 366,210 
Charters, Louisa Anne 380,208 
Chase, Michael Bertram 302,215 
Check, Beth St. Clair 
Chee, Jr., Herbert C. 
Cheek, Charles David 366,215 
CHEERLEADERS 242 : 

Chen, Angela Ruth 350,197 ^ 

Chen, Chien-Kuang ^' 

Chen, Daniel Joseph 283 ^ 

Chen, George Kwang Chow 261 
Chen, Gwo-Chuyr 
Chen, Mei-Ying 
Chem, Engmin James 
Cherry, Christopher John 
Cherwek, Laura Lee 
Chesson, Mark Cameron 232 
Chianakas, Gary Michael 
Chichester, A. Lee 248 
Chidester, Toni Moore 
Childs, Jr., William Maurice 

350.190 
Chillcott, Kimberly Del 
Chin. Wee Eng 
Chin, Yen-Lmg 
CHI OMEGA 194 
Cho. Jun Sang 
Choate, Richard K. 380.273 
Choe. Kwang Sue 350,274 
Choi, Chong Ju- 
Choi, Corona Donghi 
Cbolek. Clement 
Chon, Lisa Unkyong 
Choquette, Ernest John 
Chow, Glen Yim 366 
Chrisman, Kan Alvin 302,235 
Christensen, Carol Barbara 350, 

203 
Christensen, Garth Alan 302 
Christensen, Gaye Laurine 
Christian, Maria Christina 
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANI- 
ZATION 48 
Christman, Keith Ilia 303 
Chuday, John Charles 246 
Church, Lewis 
Ciavarclli, Linda Marie 303, 

107 
Cicila, George Thomas 350 
CIRCLE K 118 
Cirves, Brent Allen 
Clagett, Rita Hines 366 
Clancv, Timothy Gerard 
Clapham. George William 
Clark, Cynthia Ailaine 
Clark. Daniel Patrick 
Clark. Judy H. 
Clark. Lindsey Dianne 380 
Clark, Lucy Carol 380 
Clark, Nanette Faye 
Clark, Jr., Richard Franklin 380 
Clark, Ronnie 
Clark, William David 232,303, 

267 
Clarke, Joel Garland 
Clarke. Judith Gail 366 
Clarke, Karen Elaine 
Clatterbuck. Deborah Ann 303 
Clay. Susanna Jeane 
Clayton, Gina Rena 380,204 
Clayton, Mark Thomas 380 



Clayton, Mary Caroline 
Cleaiy, Eileen 366,275 
Cleary. Susan Mary 350 
Cleghom, Susan Louise 
Clem, Michael Joseph 366 
ClemenB. Clayton Marc 350,109 
Clemmer, Jane Brown 303.197, 

242 
Cleveland, Glenna H. 303 
Clevinger H, Lloyd Clark 
Clifford, John N. 
Cline. Alice Johnson 380.197 
Cline. Michael Byrd 350,34 
Clinton, Joan Louise 
Clore, Kirby Alan 350.222 
CLOSING 414 

Cloud. Kenneth Donald 239,217 
Coad, Brian Douglas 303,163. 

235,164,165 
Coates, Carol Anne 380,208 
Coates, Jo Ellen 303,208 
Cobb, James Hutton 160,163 
Cobbs, Cynthia Page 
Coble m, Robert M. 
Coccoma, Joseph Patrick 
Cochran, Daniel Harry 
Cochran DL Henry McCormick 
Cochran, James Richard 380,415 
Cochran, Mark Andrew 304 
Cochran, Robert James 304 
Cochrane, Douglas Boyd 
Cockey. Robin Ringgold 
Cockrell. Susan Todd 350 
Cody, Robert Douglas 
Coc, Conway P. 
Coe, Terrell Martin 350 
Cofer, Susan Davis 304 
Coffey. Ellen E. 
Coffman, Suzanne Elizabeth 350, 

204 
Cogdell. Andrew Patrick 
Coggin, G. Thomas 
Cohan. Celia Dawn 350 
Cohen, Joseph Mitchell 
Cohen, Katya Maria 
Cohen, Lean Anne 350 
CohiU, Paul R. 
Colby, Linda Jeanne 366 
Cole, Barbara Elizabeth 380, 

206 
Coie, Catherine Anne 366 
Cole, Kathleen Mary 366 
Cole. Patricia Hand 
Coleman, Blaine Marcel 304 
Coleman, Mary Alice Lampman 
Coleman, Ronald Bruce 304,226 

270 
Coley, Kenneth Scott 
COLLEGE REPUBUCANS 124 
Collett. Ellen Ann 
Collier, Deirdre Marie 
Collier, Stephany Ann 380 
Collier, Stephen Leonard 
CoUins, Constance E. Coyte 
Collins m. Rohland Dewitt 304 
Collins, Ruth Ann 380,58 
CoUins, Steven Edward 304, 

124,108 
Colman, Phyllis Lynne 380.260 
COLONIAL ECHO 148-149 
COLONIAL LAWYER 154-155 
Colony. Aime MandeviUe 200 
Colvin. Ronald 
Comey, James Brien 
Comfort, Pamela Minter 
Comstock. Elizabeth Joan 380, 

195 
Conaway, Sandyra Rebecca 380 
Cone, Gary Calvin 
Conley, Deirdre Ann 
Conlin, Robert Terry 
Conlon, jtemee John 
ConlonJSiihcy Ann 380,210 
Conn, oubara B. 
Connell. Elizabeth Lee 350 
Connelly, Cathleen 
Connelly, Kevin Brian 
Conner, Sandra Marie 366 
Connerton, Michele Roberta 304 
Connery, Cliff Patrick 239,228 
Contractor, Rashna Dinshaw 366, 



Cook. Douglas Robert 226 
Cook, Elisabeth Dawn 
Cook, Gary Stephen 
Cook, Katherine Blevins 
Cook, Lori Leigh 366,195.242 
Cook, Timothy Cline 
Cooke. Christopher Michael 
Cooke, Donald Ernest 
Cooke, Judith Dockery 
Cooke, Mary Lisa 
Coolbaugh. Jennifer Dale 250, 

272 
Cooley, Karen Parker 350 



Cooley, Stephen Scott 
Coon, Martha Lillian 
Cooper. Alyson Jane Francis 152 
Cooper, Amy Louise 366.204 
Cooper. Anne Elizabeth 366,203 
Cooper. Jennifer 366,208 
Cooper, John Thomas 
Cooper, Kathryn Lillian 
Copan, Jr.. William David 305 
Copley. Paul Andrew 305 
Coppes, Jr., John Charles 
Coppinger. Linda Weston 
Copple m. Sumner Edward 
Corbat, Jennifer Lee 
Corbett. Christopher Anthony 
Corddry, Amy Williams 350,204 
Cordie. Virginia Meyer 
Comette, Loreen Tipton 
Corns. Richard Evan 267 
Corrado. Jr., Michael Santo 
Correll. Nancv Elizabeth 3a5 
Correll, Steven Frank 366,5 
Corum, Celeste 
Cory. Susan Harris 350,197 
Corvdon, Leslie 306 
Costello, Owen Liam 239 
Costello, Yvonne Marie 
Coster, Michael Joim 
Coster, Michelle Elise 
Cotter. Michael Patrick 
Cotton, Michele Dawn 
Cottrell, Mary Frances 360 
Coughlan. Bryan Sutherland 127 
Coughlin, Nancy Ellen 
Coupal. Jonathan Mark 305 
Courage, Guy D. 259 
Cousino, Scott Richard 
Couture. David Rene 350 
Coven, John Leslie 270 
Covington, Grover Watkine 
Covington, Walker Louis 
Cowan, Michael Lee 
Coward, Anne Weston 305 
Cowden, Mark Joseph 
Cowley, Stacey Diane 380 
Cor, Alice Lawson 380,203 
Cox, Carrollyn Charles 396 
Cox, Herbert 0. 
Cox, Sandra Lin 366.192 
Cox m, Walter Scott 
Crabtree, Roy Eugene 
Cragg, Christine Margaret 
Craig, John Hanssen 306 
Cramer, Harlan Cart 305 
Crampsey, Cynthia Marie 
Crandley, John George 396 
Cranin. Debra Ann 366 
Crank, David Murray 380 
Cratsley, Janet Lynn 366,192 
Graver, Mark Wayne 152 
Crawford, Anna Maria 380 
Crawford, Cathy Lynn 
Crawford, Gary Maynard 
Crawley, Carolyn Scott 195 
Crean, Kevin Walsh 
Creasev. Cecil Harvey 360,249 
Creech. Anthony William 
Creedon, Peter Joseph 305,225 
Creef, Teresa Diane 
Creekmore, Karen Ruth 350.200 
Creel, Maiy M. 
Crimmins, Dennis Paul 
Crisco. Call Richard 
Crisp, Janice L. 
Crittenden, Ronald Scott 305 
Crittenden, Rowena Barron 305 
Crockett, Jr., James Strother 
Cromley, Clayton Lee 380 
Cronin, Thomas John 
Crooks, Julie Clair 305.208 
Croonenberghs, Robert E. 
Cross, Mona Lisa 305.210 
Crossett, Becky Forbes 
Crossett, Beverly Anne 380 
Grossman, Arm Heather 305,204 
Croswell, Janet L. 
Crough, Brian Dale 305 
Crough, Cynthia Mae 
Crowder, Maiy Ellen 
Crowder, Susan Lynne 380 
Crowley, Anthony Edward 
Crowley, Joseph Paul 
Crowley, Paul Roger 346 
Cnun. Terri Launa 
Crumpton, Belinda Christine 
Cruz, Marie Elizabeth 366,192 
Csellak. Linda Marie 380 
Colbert, Thomas Andrew 
Cullen, Joseph Patrick 305,3. 

107,131 
Cullifer, Susan Elizabeth 380 
Culver, John Kenneth 228 
Cumiskey, Cecilia Anne 210 
Cumiskey, Charles Joseph 
Gumming. Jonathan Reast 366 
Cummings, Jeanie Ann 
Cummings, Sandra Lynne 
Cummins. Clifford James 380 



Cummins, Rebecca Lynn 305 
Cunningham. Ann Westcott 
Cunningham, Barbara J. 380 
Cunningham. Cynthia L. 
Cunningham. Nancy Lee 
Cunningham, Robert Milton 
Cuperv. Ruth Catherine 350,192 
Curren, Patrick R. 151 
Curtis, Meosotis Carmen 
Curtis, Mvra G. 
Curtis, Sliarron Kelly 124 
Curtis, Wayne Nelson 380,127 
Cusmano, William Michael 
Custer. Scott Meredith 305.219 
Custis. Cynthia Holland 350 
Cuthrell. Jane Arlene 360 
Cutter. Deborah Lvnn 108 
Cyphers, Christie Wvnette 396 
Cyrus. Bruce Thomas 
Czerkawski, Jr., Joseph John 



D 



Dacales. Craig Spero 350 
Daggett, Mary Jo 
Dagilaitis. Blaise 380 
Dagostino, Denise Colleen 380, 

243 
Dahill, John Joseph 
Dahl. Debra Mane 305 
Dahlman. Nant^ Mitchell 305, 

195 
Dalby, Paul Stephen 
Dalby, Robin Aime 380 
Dalton, Ann Creekmur 350 
Dalton, Brian Welch 217.273 
Dalton. Katherine Scott 305, 

107,191,192,109 
Dalton, Keith Sinclair 273 
Daly, Laura Aim 
Daly. Lauren Ann 192,250.261 
Daly. Jr., Mark T. 
Damario, Mark Anthony 253,283 
Dambekalns, Lydia 366,415 
Damon, Daniel M. 
Damon. Stuart Russell 
Damron, Emory W. 
Danahy, Elizabeth Anne 284 
Daniel, Kimberlv Ann 366 
Daniel. Samuel W. 
Daniel, William Scott 
Daniels, Jeri Anne 380,200,280 



272 

Darley, Susan Elaine 305 
Darling, Cynthia L, 208 
Damton, Rebecca Ann 305,192 
Darrell, Stephanie Jo 380 
Daskaloff, Thomas Michael 
Daspit, Linda Anne 
Daus, Paul Alan 278 
Daussin, Michele Marie 306 
Davenport. Helen Frances 197 
Davenport, John Joseph 
Davidson, Bruce George 219. 

109,263 
Davidson, Kathy Ellen 
Davidson, Timothy Channell 306 
Davies, Driwia Lucille 260.281 
Davies. Elaine H. 
Davies, Jonathan Edward 396 
Davin, Christopher Gerard 246 
Davis, Charles Elliot 366 
Davis, Charles Richard 
Davis. Cheryl Renee 
Davis, Deborah Ann 
Davis, Jr., Derick G.S. 
Davis. Douglas S. 
Davie, Jr., Everett Biery 
Davis, James Bryan 246 
Davis. Kaye Marie 380 
Davis. Kimberly Rebecca 380 
Davis. Larry Wade 396 
Davis, Lincla Ann 306,208 
Davis. Pamela Harris 
Davis, Robert James 380.263 
Davis. Walter Lee 107,239,219, 

109 
Davis m, William Parker 131 
Davoli, Cecilia Teresa 360 
Dawson. Bradley Layne 219 
Dawson, Maryanne Riggs 126 
DawBon, Robert Nelson 232 
Deal, Betty Jean 
Deambrosi, Rodolfo 
Deane, Alexandra 351 



Deane. Glenn Donald 
Deane, Jon Bryan 306 
Debebe, Betru 
Debelles. William Salisbury 



268,269 
Decker. Jr., Roy Grant 
Deeriog, Tracy Lee 380.195,277 
Defelice, Charlene Deirdre 
Degiorgio, Elvira Ann 306 
Depnan, Maureen 306 
Deiamette, Jeanne Leigh 306 
Delacruz, Susan Ellen 366 
Delaney, Glenn Roger 
Delaney, Mary Shannon :106 
Delano. Jr.. Robert Barnes 394 
Delguidice. Ralph Edward 
Delistraty, Damon Andrew 
Dell, Robert Edward 380 
Delmar, Debra Sharon 
Deloatch, Vasti 
Delong, Carole Anne 
Delos, Sue Ellen 
Delphendahl, Audrey -Renate 
Delserone, Jr., Bernard 

Anthony 380 
DELTA DELTA DELTA 196-197 
DELTA OMICRON 126 
DELTA SIGMA THETA 198-199 
Deluea. Michael Paul 
Demanche, Robert 
Dembinski. Thomas John 306 
Demiranda, Maria Raquel Baatos, 



215 
Denny, Brian John 217 
Dequaine, Charles Greville 
Derringe, Arlene Gerard 
Dervishian, Victoria Mary 351, 

414,415,109 
Desamper, Kimberlee 306 
Desmond, Brian Edward 
Dettmer, Peter Robert 
Dever, George D. 
Devine, Gregory Carl 285 
Devlin. Felicity Anne 
Devore, Mary Lynn 351,208 
Devriea. Patricia Faye 151,192 
Dewandel. Mark Steven 307 
Dewey, Barbara Michelle 
Dewey. Robert Lvman 
Dewilde, Mary Kim 307 
Dewitt. Michael H. 
Deyoung. Ann Sinclair 
Deyoung. Michael Willia 
Diakun. Richard 351,127 
Diamond. Terry Lee 



307 



Dickens, Alleyne Hope 351 
Dickens, Martha Diane 260 
Dickenson. Daniel David 
Dickerson. Kathy Del 
Dickerson, Michelle Ann 204, 

Dickie, Claire Llewellyn 366, 

195 
Dickmeyer, James Edward 
Dickson, John Scott 351 
Diehl, Nancy Hart 366.210 
Dierks, Kenneth A. 
Dieter. Carolyn Rose 
Dieterie, Mark Erik 351.270 
Diez, Jorge L. 
Diggan. Ann Renee 307.261 
Diggs, Janet Ruth 
Diilon, Larry Gene 
Dillon, Timothy Patrick 
Dinardo. James Joseph 366,239. 

217 
Dinardo, Mary E. 307 
Dirosa, Teresa Josephine 307 
Dise, Carol Lynn 351 
Disilveetro, Matthew Pierce 
Disque, Dana Ann 380,210 
Ditmore, James Martin 
Diver, Lori Gordon 250 
Dixon, Carolyn Diana 380 
Dixon, Elizabeth Ellen 
Dixon, Katharine Ua 380.200 
Dobbins, Mark Cabell 366 
Dobbs, Kathryn Ann 361 
Dobbs. Kerwin Delon 270 
Dobel, David Frank 
Dockery. Deborah Joyce 
Dockery, Donna Jov 200 
Dodd. David Edwin 232 
Dodd Diann Louise 351.206 



192 

Doherty, Jr., Francis J. 
Doherty, Gerard 
Dolan, Edward M. 
Dolan, Jr., Eugene Thomas 
Dolan, Mary Kathleen 
Dolbec, Bradley Peter 
Donahue, John Padraic 351 
Donelson. Deborah Lee 
Donley, Rebecca Moran 
Donnell, Kathryn Rae 
Donnelly, Margaret Wetherbee 

200 
Donnelly, Susan Margaret 248 
Doran, Darryl Joseph 
Doman, John R. 
Dorow, Judith Ann 381 
Doss, Joseph Kim 307 
Doty, Joyce Claire 
Dougherty, Donna Jean 351.195 
Dougherty, Robin Corinna 366 
Douglass, Alphonao A. 
Doverspike. Montee A. 
Dow, Jennifer Ottawav 381.195, 

383,272 
Dowd. Timothy Patrick 351,263 

283 
Dowdy, Steven Riddick 
Dowlen. Peter Michael 228 
Downey, Joan Danaher 307 
Downs. Lauren Brooke 
Doyle. Kevin Saunders 381 
Doyle. Margaret Marv 307.195 
Doyle, Michael Joseph 307.220, 

221.249 
Doyle. Michael Thomas 
Dozier. Jeffrey Calvin 
Drake, Para Rodenhizer 
Drake, Sheldon Douglas 
Drake, Wilfred Francis 
Draper, David R. 
Dresely, Donald Kevin 307 
Drewer. Alan Griffin 239.217 
Drews, Cynthia Collins 
Dreyer. Diane Marie 307.192 
Dreyer, Mark Alan 381 
Dring. Kathleen 
Driver. Douglas Gene 381 
Driver. Jr., Robert Edwin 225 
Drljaca. Daniel Thomas 351,249 
Drozda. Irene Sofie 
Drubel IV. August Charles 
Drubel, Paula Catherine 
DruUard, Sam Alan 
Dubel, John Stephen 351.151, 

232 
Dubois, Jonathan Michael 263 
Dubose, Allen Omega 
Dubuque. Stephan A. 
Duckworth, Christina Lee 366 
Dudson, Paulina 307 
Duff, Sheryl Linn 
Duffy, Barbara Jean 381,192 
Duffy, Julia 381,197 
Duffy, Michael Scott 366 
Duffy. Patricia Josephine 248 
Duffj'. Sean Thomas 
DulTy. Jr., Thomas Neils 
Duggan, Maiy Dale 
Duggan, Patrice Lee 210 
Dugger, Rebecca Lynn 
Duke. David Marshall 2:35 
Duke, John M. 

Dullaghan, Matthew Peter 307 
Dunbar. Margaret Randolph 307 
Dunbar. Thomas William 381 
Duncan, David Arend 
Duncan, Dennis Harrell 
Duncan. Robert Clvde 307.236. 

283 
Dunkley. Diane L. 
Dunlop, Janet Schultz 396 
Dunn. Daniel Theodore 
Dunn, Gail 

Dunn, John Stewart 351,225 
Dunn. Maureen Ann 275 
Dunn. Patricia Ksu^n 
Dunn. Robert Carter 307 
Dunn. Robert Roy 
Dunn, Teresa Lvnne 381 
Dunn, William Mark 
Dunne, Timothv 
Duren. Charlotte Anne 
Durfy. Patricia 366 
Durgin, Harry Watson 
Durham, James Christopher 217 
Diimin. Peter Mark 
Durrelt III. J^ieph rvu?sel! :^51 
Vuflt. R'jS^rt -T. 
L^.-^r MiL'hnfl Jt^'-.n 
D-A-j/t:. VS'ilUam Jfjhn 



Dwyer, William Vincent 230.231 

Dyar. Cynthia Louise 

Dye, Steve Edward 253,283 

Dver, Charlotte 307 

Dyer. Dana Ellen 351 

Dyer HI, Raymond Douglas 307, 

'235 
Dyess, Jackie L. 
Dj'keman, Jr., James E. 
Dvkera, Thomas Marler 
DvkBtra. Craig David 351 

E 



Eagle. Suzanne Leslie 200 
Eagles, Virginia Rose 203 
Eakin. Lenden. Alan 
Eanes, Tracy Lee 351 
Earl, Kathryn Elizabeth 381 
Early, Lela Katherine 208,307 
Eason, Jr.. Carl Edward 396 
East. Steven Howell 
Easter, John Richardson 
Easton, Brian 215,307,108 
Eaton, Catherine Swanson 
Eaton, Mary Elizabeth 308. lOB 
Ebe. Donald Charles 
Ebersole, Glenda Raye 
Eccard, Donna Lee 206,243,308, 

108 
Eckhardt, Jr., John HoUoman 
Eckles, Elizabeth Byrd 
Eddins. Nan C. 
Eddy, Lisa Kay 192 
Edgerton, Amy Elizabeth 211, 

308 
Edholm, Natalie Ann 200 
Edmiston, Kim Dianne 195,308 
Edmonston, Kathryn Nell .366 
Edwards, Cathy Jane 366 
Edwards, Laura Jennelle 242, 

366 
Edwards, Lizabeth Lee 197,256 
Edwards, Steven Wayne 
Efford, Richard Edwin 308 
Efford, Wanda Strickland 351 
Egan, Clau-e Frances ,381 
Eggerton, John Sanaom -308 
Ehlenfeldt, Dawn Deborah 
Eichelberger, Drew Alan 273 
Eisenhauer, Susan Marie 208, 

308 
Eklund. David Alan 246 
Eklund, Lynn Louise 366 
Elder, Judith Carol 126 
Eldridge, Denise Ann 362 
Eley, Claud Vonschilling 
Eley, Elizabeth Sasser 
Elgersma, Jan Bemhard 
Elium. Sandra Lee 308 
EUenbogcn, David Joel 235,246 
Ellenson, James Stephen 
Ellers. Debra Kathleen 
Ellington, Michael Robert 252, 

253.295,283 
Elliott, Elwood Victor 396 
Elliott, Larry Kent 
Elliott, Marilyn Ann 381 
Elliott, Pamela Linn 
Ellis. Carroll Lee 382 
Ellis, Gary Dudley 213,283 
Ellis, Geri S. 
Ellis, Gerry Williams 
Ellis IV, Hal Roberts 382 
Ellis, Kathleen Marguerite 
EUis, Kevin Michael 232,263, 

2a3 
Ellis, Lenita J. 
Ellis. Mark Ewell 225 
Ellis. Shirley Elizabeth 
EUixson. Bonnie Lynne 382 
Ells. Julie Marie 382 
Elmendorf. Michael Lee 
Elwell, Robert Miles 232 
Emans, Charlotte Marie 192,366 
Emden, Karen A. 
Emery, Robin Alice 210,366 
Emmert, Barbara Arm 
Enderson, Mark Christie 
Endlcr. Gerald S. 
Engelhardt. Nancy Jeanne 382 
Englert. Lee Ann 308 
English. Beverly Anne 124.366 
English. Evan Allen 
Engman. Bevin LesUc 206,250 
Ennis, April Dawn 308 
Enoch, Michael Joseph 
Enver, Ahsan 



Enyeart, Nancy Jeanne 
Epstein, Joseph Kanter 308 
Erard, Mark Edward 
Erceg, Andrea Jean 366 
Ermhck, David Lewis 127 
Erwin, Edward Hamilton 366 
Esbenscn, Kristen Lynn 289,366. 

Estabrook, Dmcilla Holt 366 
Estes. Jennie Cheairea 
Estes, Mary Sue 211,308 
Estis, Monty A. 352.270 
Etheridge, David Charles 
Etheridge, EUen Wise 196,309 
Etheridge, Nelson Jerome 382 
Eurc, Fay Elizabeth 248,309 
Eure, Jr.. Samuel Lee 107,242, 

309 
Eure, Waiiam Bradford 232,246 
Evanow, Peter Staccy 235,309 
Evans, Bruce Treavor 
Evans II, Gerald Meredity 242, 

309 
Evans IH, Irvin Edison 249 
Evans, John Ryan 230,366 
Evans, Karen Gay 382 
Evans, Kimberly 382 
Evans, Jr., Roy Cameron 
Evans, William Joseph Clark 382 
Everly, Kristen Anne 352 
Evers, Bradley Wayne 
Eversolc, Mark Coleman 222,223 
Everton, Sarah Beth 
Evoy, Susan Amanda 
Ewing, James Conrad 
Ewing, Virginia Rankin 309 
Eye, David Berlin 127,382 
Eyre, Phyllis Eileen 



F 



Faber, Beth Lyim 191,206,309 
Fabrizio, Joan Marie 210,309 
Fahey, Nancy Lee 107,200,309, 

108,264 
Faillace, Jr., Richard Michael 

367 
Failor, Patrice Laree 382 
Paini, Patricia A. 192,367 
Faircloth, Jr., Harry Winston 
Fakadej, Maria Margaret 114, 

144.367 
Fallon, William Charles 278 
Familant, Lawrence J. 
Fancher. Allen Prude 
Fanuele. Joseph Anthony 
Faraday. Martha Marie 
Farano. Roger P. 367 
Fariel, Peter Thomas 190,230 
Farinholt, Tabb T, 
Farley, Page Allison 210,309 
Farrand, Carol Elaine 
Farrand, William Patrick 222, 

352,108 
Farrell, Kathleen M. 
Fasfier, Thomas Paul 
Faulkner, John Francis 249 
Pauls, Meredith Anne 309 
Fawcett, Daniel Stephen 
Fay, Erin Marie 
Fedder, Kirk S. 
Fehncl, Paula Louise 203,382 
Feins, James Philip 108 
Feldman, Todd Harris 
FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN 

ATHLETES 49 
Felt, Mary Eleanor 268 
Fenig, David Henry 
Fenimore, Deborah Ann 382 
Fenity, Joanne M. 382.281 
Fenstamaker, Jr.. Richard Lisle 
Fentrias, Beverly Ann 309 
Fenwick, Donna Marie 382 
Ferentinos, Lisa Simonet 108 
Ferguson, Anne Elizabeth 309 
Ferguson, Charlene D. 
Ferguson. Eleanor Ann 
Ferguson. Elizabeth Marie 309, 

264 
Ferguson, Gregoiy Scott 
Ferguson, Mary Elaina 
Ferguson, Rita Holdren 
Fernandez, Maria Milagros 3.52 
Ferree, Dawn Lea 275 
Ferree, Richard Scott 
Ferrie, Maureen V. 
Ferris, Susan Renee 382 



Ferris, Tricia Arlette 

Ferrone, Keith Andrew 270 

Fesler. Laura Ann 109 

Fessenden, John Thomas 242,367 

Fetterman, Robert Todd 

Ficklen, Carter B. 

Fields, William Sutton 396,109 

Fife, James Douglas 

Filosa, Anne Patricia 

Fimian, Keith S. 

Fimian, Stephen John 213 

Finch, Brent Cameron 235,367 

Findlay, Julie Mary 208,382 

Findlay, Margaret Ann 210,367 

Fineran, Lawrence Alan 124,309 

Finger, Kevin John 

Fink, Lois Hope 309 

Finlcy, Peggy Ann 382 

Finn, Mary Patricia 

Finn, Patricia Anne 

Fioramonti, Karen Marie 

Fioramonti, William Edward 200, 
309 

Firebaugh, Jr., James Calvin 

Fischer. Sheila Anne 367 

Fisher, Christopher Paul 132, 
382 

Fisher, Daniel J. 

Fisher, David George 93,309 

Fisher, Laura Ann 208,352 
Fisher, Susan Aileen 382 
Fisher. Valerie Kaye 382 
Fisher II. WiUiam Wright 
Fitchett. Kenneth Wayne 105 
Fitzgerald, Ann Elizabeth 208, 

309 
Fitzgerald, Deborah Carol 208 
Fitzgerald, Dennis Michael 
Fitzgerald, Frank Moore 309 
Fitzgerald, Michael James 
Fitzpatrick, Denise E. 309 
Pitzpatrick, Dennis Thomas 239, 

228 
Fitzsimmons. Kathleen 
Flaherty, Patricia Ann 281 
Flaig, Judith Ann 382 
Flat Hat 146 
Flatin, Daniel Christian 
Flai, Jeffrey Cansino 
Fleming, Jr., Douglas Lee 309 
Fleming, John David 
Fleming, Kellie Wingfield 208, 

309 
Fleming, Richard Charles 396 
Flemmg, Vernon C. 
Fletcher, Charles Richards 
Flet<:her, Elizabeth Buchanan 
Fletcher, Jennifer Lynn 45,367 
Fletcher, Karen Rhodes 
Fletcher HI, Paul Edwin 149, 

222,309,415 
Fletcher, Timothy Farrell 
Flippen. Jeanette Perkins 
Flora. John Warren 
Flora, Paul Richard 
Floumoy, Cynthia Ann 310 
Flowers, Mattie Blewett 
Flovd, Cynthia Ann 204,205, 

310 
Floyd, Jr., Tracy Dewitt 
Flynn, Richard John 310 
Flyrm. Sheila Marie 
Polan, John Duncan 382 
Folaros. Peter Arthur 
Foley, Leslie Erin 
Fones, Michael Robert 367,267 
Foody, Ellen Kathryn 203,352 
Foran, Constance Ann 3,385 
Forbes, Craig Thomas 
Forbes, Elizabeth Vanette 210, 

Forbes, Jeffrey Alan 382 
Forbes, Loretta Lee 
Forbes, Susan Norene 
Ford, Alice Caroline 
Ford, Douglas Dysart 
Ford, John BuUard 310 
Ford, Margaret Meisburger 
Ford, Sara Jocelyn 352 
Ford, WilUam Arlington 
Forehand, Suzanne S. 
Forrest, Kenneth Melvin 
Forrester, Sharon Anne 192,310 
Forrey, Scott Kendall 
Forsman, Paul James 396 
Forthubcr, Stephen Max 382 
Fortner, Lorraine Diane 
Fortner, Steve William 310 
Foster, Amy Marie 382 
Foster, Anne Graves 
Foster, Betty Ajine 
Foster, James Julius 310 
Foster, Judith Christine 396 
Foster, Lee Anne 210,367 
Foster, Nancy Arlene 382 
Foster, Susan Elizabeth 277 
Foster m, William Irving 
Foth, Robert James 



Foukea, Jr., Charles Albert 
Fountaine, Michael Brent 
Foumier, Elizabeth Short 206, 

382,415 
Fox, Carolyn Ann 352 
Fox. Cynthia Anne 382 
Fox m. James Phillip 
Fox, Kathryn Jo 
Fox, Morton Blane 382 
Foxgrover, James Lee 
Foy, Donald Quan 
Frace, Gail Terese 
Frakes, Joseph Patrick 
Frampton, Paul Edwin 
Francia, Nancy Anne 310 
Franco, Thomas Edward 229,239, 

241 
Franke, Christine Aim 
Pranke, Clarke R. 
Franklin, Rachel Elaine 
Franks, Brenda Lynn 352 
Franz, Matthew Gerard 263 
Franzen, Charles Rice 310 
Franzyshen, Stephen Keith 382 
Fratt, David Brown 222 
Frazier, Jr., Lewis Deahl 230 
Fredettc, Thomas J. 
Fredericks, Daniel D. 
Frecdman, Carol Ann 191,200, 

310,284 
Freeman, John Douglas 
Freet, Richard A. 
Freiling, Marie Therese 310 
Freimund, Jennifer Lynn 367 
Frey, Diane E. 
Friar, Robert Graham 
Frick, Elizabeth Anne 248,260, 

368,272 
Friedfeld, Lauren Suzanne 195, 

Friedheim, Cynthia Diane 208, 

368 
Friedman, Brett Richard 
Friedman, Cheryl Stacy 230 
Friend, Pamela Jo 196,368 
Fries, Jay Robert 396 
Frifich, Adam A. 
Frisina, Stephen E. 239 
Fritz. Karri Lynn 352 
Fritz. Lowell WiUiam 
FritzBche, Leslie Lynn 
Frommer, Ann Mills 
Fronczak, Gregory John 235,352, 

Flonko, Richard Michael 235 
Fitjom, Janet Diane 310 
Froom. Richard Allan 
Frost, Karen Therese 191,197 
Frye, Charlotte Anne 368 
Rye, James Edward 382 
iSye, Jay Kendall 
Fucella. Elizabeth Lynn 
Fupate. Thomas Ian 
Fuiiraoto, Wendy Alice 
Fulcher. Jr., Thomas Montague 

147,133,352 
Fultord. David Edward 368 
Fulford, Debra Shawn 108 
Fuller, Jennifer LesUe 382 
Fuller, Nancy Lynn 310 
Fuller, Sandra Lee 394 
Fullerton, John Hampton 235 
Fulton, Charles Ashley 
Fultz, Paula Gail 310 
Fuqua, Barbara Ann 
Furey, Susan Veronica 



G 



Gaida, Romy K. 
GaiUiot, Cecilia Anne 352 
GailUot, Robert Vemon 
Gainer, Baibaxa B. 
Gaines, Jr.. Clarence Edward 
Gaines, John Ransone 239,368 
Galbreath, Karen Hunter 310 
Galtaer, Dougtaa Craig 
Gallagher, Mary Beth 
Gallagher, Sean Thomas 
Gallant, James Christopher 
GalU. Odette Suzanne 382.272 
Gallop, Stephen Charles 246 
Galloway, Elizabeth Agnew 310. 

108,276,277 
Galvao, Helena Maria 
Galvis, Sergio 352 
Gamber, Cayo Elizabeth 310 



Gamma Phi Beta 200 
Gammisch, Robert A. 
Gant, Douglas John 
Darcia-Tunon, Alvaro 
Gardiner, Mark Steven 
Gardner, Linda M. 
Garfield, Richard L. 
Garland, David Wayne 65.140, 

235.415.109 
Garland, Karen Hilary 382 
Garland. Pet« H. 
Gamer, Robert Dale 217.263 
Gamer, Vickey Lee 310 
Gamette. Cynthia Sue 368 
Garrett, Bonnie Jeanne 382 
Garrett, Donald Perry 
Garrett, Frank McEnery 
Garrett. Michael Thomas 368 
GarriBon. Cheryl Ann 310 
Garrison, Thomas Val 
Garrity, Christopher Brendan 

239 
Gartner, Catherine Anne 
Gartner, Jr., John V. 
Gaskell, Cecile Genevieve 261 
Gasparini, Alessandro Luigi 
Gassert. Beth Eileen 
Gast-on, Gary R. 
Gately, Catherine Ann 352 
Gates, Alan Bigelow 253,283 
Gates m, Benton Earl 310 
Gat«3, Evalyn Irene 206,289 
Gates in, Francifi Kenneth 
Gates, Rosemary Landow 
Gatz. Robert Christopher 
Gaucher, Jay Paul 
Gaudian, David John 
Gaudian, Robert Earl 190,232, 

249.352 
Gaudiitz, Janet Charlene 368 
Gaut, James Robert 352 
Gauthey, Julie Elizabeth 
Gauthier, Scott Alan 267,270 
Gebhardt, Gregory Roos 382 
Gedettis, Jean Ellen 310 
Geitbman, James Peter 382 
Genadio, Patricia Marie 382 
Gentry, Chloe Marie 
George, Denise Ann 197,352 
George, Jonathan Andrew 
George, Sue Ellen 310 
Georgeson, Dean Eric ' 
Geralds, Kathrvn Lynn 
Geris, Karen Justine 383 
German, Hallett H. 
Gemer. John Lawrence 128 
Geroe, Kenneth Vincent 396 
Gen-ity. Bruce Charles 396 
Gersema, George Harold 
Gerahmtm, David Paul 
Gescheider, Laurie Marie 170 
Getler. Belinda 
GholBton, Susan Evon 151,352 
Gibbs, Elizabeth Alexander 
Gibba, Janis Marie 181,368 
Gibbs, Jason Michael 127 
Gibson, David William 
Gibson, Joan W. 397 
Gibson, Joseph C. 
Gibson, Lynn Heather 
Gibson, Michael Allen 
Givson. Patricia Kathleen 310 
Giedd, AbigaU Mary 368 
Giesecke, Alice Fay 
Gieeecke, Corinne Marie 203, 

Gifford, David Brayton 397,108, 

Gift. Jan M. 195 
Gift. Jef&ey Scott 310 
Giguere, Michael Joseph 397, 

109 
Giles. Kent H. 352 
Giles, Mark Anthony 383,278 
Gill. Melissa Dawn 
Gillespie, Richard T. 
Gillette, Michele Anne 
Gilley, Glenn Rot 311 
GUatrap, John Thomas 127,311. 

109 
Gioia, Deborah Anne 197,383 
Giorgi, Jacqueline Ann 311 
Giovanetti, Kevin L. 
Giroux, JefErey William 
Guicbici, Katherine Susan 
Giuliani, Thomas Mitchell 
Glancy, Catherine Edna 383 
Glass, Alexander Evan 
Glass HI, Benjamin Weaver 
Glass, Kristen G. 
Glass, Richard Wayne 
Gleeson, Thomas W. H, 352 
Glendening, Bruce Bradford 
Glenn, Jane Siobhan 200,311 
Glick, Debra Louiae 
Glock, Patricia Ann 202,203, 

311 
Glotb m, Fred Michael 249, 



404/Index 



311.263 
Gloth. Paul Daniel 
Glover, Catherine Wilson 
Glover. Nancy Sue 
Glover. William Ethan 
Glupker, David Alan 
Gocnenour, Anne Stewart 311. 

109 
Godfrev. Charles W. 
Godfrey. Jr.. Thomas Walter 
Godwin, Jeffrey Linn 239.263 
Goohner, Carol Jean 311 
Goertz, Judith Ann 192,368 
Goetz, Jr., Robert Bernard 232 
Goewey. Catherine Cecile 200, 

250 
Goff, Chlorie Elixabeth 
Goff, Toni Lynn 369 
Goldberg, Daniel Jay 225 
Goldberg, Kenneth Ira 
Golden m. John Wesley 
Golden, Michael F. 
Goldich, Michael Steven 230 
Goldsmith, M. Yvonne Ewell 
Goldstein, Lisa Frances 
Golub, Linda P. 
GoQshor, Lee Gerard 
Gonzales, Roceta Jo Santos 383 
Good, Katherine Burgess 
Goode, David Beale 
Goode, Richard Lee 239 
Goodell, Laurie Lee 383 
Gooding, Melinda Dawn 
Goodman, Norman Craig 
Goodman, Ray Bradford 
Goodrich, Michael L. 352,267 
Goodwin, Stephen T. 220 
Gordineer. Brian Edward 383 
Gordon, Ann Elizabeth 210.351. 

369 
Gordon, Donald Paul 
Gordon, Scott Ashton 108 
Gordon, Stuart Jay 273 
Gore. Kay M. 

Gorges, Kathryn Anne 312,415 
Gormley HI, Edward Paul 190, 

223 
Gomet. Anne Marie 113,147, 



153 

Gottwald, Mary Prosser 208,369 
Gough, William Henry 
Gould. Barbara Lynn 
Gould, Jeffrey Robert 249 
Gould. Pamela Sue 200,255 
Gould, Richard Thomas 
GOVERNMENT 85 
GRADUATES 100-105 
Gragg, Annie M. 
Graham, George Adams 127 
Graham, Jeffrey James 127 
Graham, Kathryn Tagg 353 
Graham, Mark Andrew 312 
Graham, Nancy Ruth 210 
Graham. Pet€r Michael 312,235 
Graichen. Margaret Ann 369 
Graine, Steven Marc 232,246 
Granger. Douglas Scott 
Grant, Ann Marie 
Grant, John Bruce 228.312 
Grant. Teresa Carroll 353 
Grasberger. Stephen David 235 
Grasberger, Thomas Joseph 
Grass, Jeffrey M. 
Grattan, Adelaide Maxwell 
Graves, May Margaret 
Gray, Glynis Temll 
Gray. Joann Collier 312 
Gray. John Michael 
Gray. Susan Walker 
Graybill, Lyn Shelton 
Grayson, William Wayne 353 
GREEKS 188 
Greeley, David Donald 217 
Green, Craig Compton 
Green. Robert M. 235,353 
Green, Walter Taylor 312 
Greene, Connie Lee 369 
Greene. John Norman 
Greene, Patricia Lynn 312 
Greene. Stephen Hugh 
Greeneisen, Lee Ann 210,353 
Greenlaw. Douglas Charles 
Greenwood, Cheryl Gay 383 
Gregg. Margaret Elizabeth 192, 



397 

Gregory. Karen Grace 369 
Gregory. William Carson 312 
Greifer, Helen Sue 203.369 
Greimel, Sylvia 
Greiwe, Timothv Alan 312 
Gremillot, Todd Christopher 
Grenn, Michael William 



Gresham, Linda Jane 210,211, 

312 
Griffin, Christopher Patrick 

239.228 
Griffin, Greg Donald 
Griffin, James Edwin 230 
Griffin, Peter Charles 228, 

238 239 
Griffith, David Michael 
Griffith. Lawrence David 
Griffith, Stephen Murray 
Griffiths. Jennifer Hendrick 

383 



Grobel, Stephen Lynn 
Grogan, David Edward 230,369 
Groome. Linda Williams 397 
Groover, Donna Charlene 243, 

353 
Gross, Annette Fosque 
Gross. Barbara Lauren 369 
Gross, Diana Lynne 
Grover, Ernest R. 
Grunska. Robert Scott 
Grunwald, Robert Mark 
GseU, David Allen 
Guenther, Mary Quinn 
Guenther, Norman Hunter 383 
Gunter. Phyllis Ann 
Gupta. Pradeep Kumar 131 
Gurley, Christine 383 
Gusmer, Maria Ann 
Gutcher, Charles William 
Guthrie, Jen Lee 
Guy, Alice Evelyn 248,369 
Guy. Elizabeth Claiborne 
Guy, Stephen Richard 
Gwynn, Babette 
Gwynn, Matthews Weber 369 



H 



Haas, Cindy L. 
Haaa. David Clarli 217,239 
Haase, Dennis Michael 397 
Haberman, Joseph Casey 369 
Habich. Carol Elizabeth 192, 

312 
Habicht, Judith Ann 203,369 
Hackathom, Jocelin Louise 
Haden, David Samuel 
Hadlock. Loma Jane 
Hadow, Kenneth MacDonald 
Hagsn, Ann Forrest 206,369 
Hagans, Robert Franklin 397 
Haghighi, Carolyn Hagfaighi 
Hagon, Michael Douglas 283 
Hahm, Esther Chung Mi 353 
Hahm. John Hongjoo 
Hahn, Benjamin Mahlon 
Hailey, Robert Carter 
Haines, Stephen Lee 
Hairston, Birdie Ann 198, 

312,109 
Hairston, Pamera Deanice 369 
Halbohn, Deborah Ellen 312,126 
Hale, Sheila Patricia 
Hale, Theodore Brian 
Hales, Rosemary Ann 208,312 
Haley, Karen Bryce 203,383 
Haley, Mary Tod 195,383 
Hall, Deborah Lynn 
Hall, Douglas C. 
Hall, James Douglas 242,369 
Hail, Jennifer Amoena 125,312 
HaU, Jody Uigh 196 
Hall, Lanncr Taun 
Hall, Mark Lee 
Hall, Robert Venion 225 
Hall, Roy Peter 
Hall, Stephen Robert 312 
Hall, Suzy Tipson 
Hall, Timothy Wayne 
Haller, Kenneth L. 
Haller. Kimberly Jean 312 
Hallett, Doris Lippmann 
Halliday, John T. 
Hallman, Robert Andrew 383 
Hallock, Jeffrey Moruoe 
Halpert, Arthur Lee 312,108 
Halstead, Gail Lynne 203,369 
Haltiwanger, Rae Ann 200,201. 

108 
Hambidge, Alfred Arnold 
Hambley, Gwyneth Ellen 208,369 
Hamilton, Beth Bancroft 



Hamilton, David Dwight 
Hamilton, David Kevin 
Hamilton, Lyrme Ann 383 
Hamilton, Milton Holmes 
Hamilton, Pixie Ann 250,353. 

272 
Hamilton, Stasia Sadler 250, 

383 
Hamlett, Kim Winifred 353 
Hamlin, Terri Ann 206,383 
Hammaker, Charles Aldine 19 



383 
Hammersmith. Gary Scott 
Hammock, Deborah Leigh 
Hammond, Cynthia Leigh 
Hammond, Debra Lynn 192,383 
Hammond, Mary Lee 
Hancks, Rian William 
Hancock, David John 353 
Henderson, Kevin Burke 
Handler, Joanne 
Handlev, Charles Batton 
Hanel, Jeri Ellen 312 
Hanes, Ok-Hoo 
Hancv, Kevin Michael 230 
Hanley, Mark T. 
Hanlon. Kathleen Ann 261.312 
Hansen. James Duncan 
Hansen. Janette Elizabeth 31. 

200.312 
Hanson. John Clifford 
Happel, Cynthia Carol 192 
Haralson, Edmund 353 
Harant, Mark Stephen 
Harbottle. Scott Allan 
Harcum, Janet Rose 383 
Hardardt, Kevin Matthew 
Hardcastle, James Michael 
Harder. Deborah Katherine 
Hardin. Carolyn Sue 
Hardin. Kelly Elizabeth 383 
Hardin. Sharon Jones 
Harding. Leannah Mason 383 
Harding. William Emerson 313, 

267 
Hardy, Robert William 
Hargadon, Sue Ellen 
Hargest, Charles Lloyd 226 
Hargett, Steven Bennett 226 
Hargraves, Cheryl Denise 
Harhan, Margaret Ann 313 
Harkleroad. Teresa Lynn 
Harllee, Robert William 313 
Harlow, David Stuart 
Harlow, Jill Bemice 363 
Herman, Sarah Anne 383,265 
Harold, Rosemary Catherine 113, 

144,203,353,415 
Harper, Pamela Jo 
Harper, Paul Montgomery 
Harper, Rhonda Mae 369 
Harper, Tamrae Leigh Almond 
Harrell, Louis J. 
Harrick, Barbara 
Harrigan, Richard Allen 313 
Harrington, Craig Jerome 239 
Harrington, Gregory Philip 313, 

108 
Harrington, William Patrick 

217,256,259,313 
Harris, A. Brent 384 
Harris, Barbara Anne 353 
Harris, Brenda 
Harris, David Caven 219,313 
Harris, Gary Alan 
Harris, Gregory Scot 353 
Harris, Jeffrey Wilson 313 
Harris, L. Suzanne 
Harris, Merged Griffith 397 
Harris, Marshall Freeman 369 
Harris, Nancy 369 
Harris, Rhonda Cooke 200 
Harris, Robert Quentin 397 
Harris, Welford 397 
Harrison, Ann Elizabeth 
Harrison, Beth Watson 369 
Harrison, Elizabeth Fenwick 

210,384 
Harrison, Emmett Bruce 384 
Harrison, James Gardner 384 
Harrison, Keith Jav 107,131, 

415,109 
Harrison, Reid Williams 283 
Harrison, Steven Anthony 225 
Harrod, William Michael 131 
Harsher, Dorothy Lee 
Hart, Brian Kennedy 314 
Hart, Janet Irene 275 
Hart, Karl Christopher 235, 

274,314 
Hart, Rebecca Lee 195 
Hartberger, Sharon Elaine 369 
HartOeld, Rebecca Redd 2a3, 

Hartley, Cynthia Jill 353 



Hartman, Thomas Joseph 
Hartmann, Doramarv Cynthia 314 
Harton, Sandra Doris 210,369 
Hartsog, Catherine Eva 204, 

353,108 
Harvey, Gule Andrew 230 
Harvey, Paul Francis 
Harvey, Timothy Rav 225,314 
Harvey, Virginia Ellen 49,126 
Harwood, Sally Christian 196, 

197 
Hashimoto, Karen Michi 384 
Hassell, John David 353 
Hassell, Michael Warren 
Hassell, Sarah Emily 192 
Hassett, Peter Joseph 225,369 
Hastings, Steven J. 
Hatch, Nancy R. 
Hatcher, Pemie Carol 314,415 
Hatcher, Raymond Lewis 242,384 
Hatchett, Ambler Marsteller 384 
Hatrak, Bruce Michael 222,353 
Hauer, Joel Lynn 
Haug, Peter 

Haugh, Natalie Jo 204,205,353 
Haurand, Virginia Anne 
Havelka, Terry Lee 228,239, 

287 
Havener, Donald Clarke 
Havens, Keith Bryne 181 
Hawes, Theodore Wilbur 
Hawk, Beverly Sue 369 
Hawkins, Dora Lynne 
Hawkins, Lena Marie 
Hawthorne, Peel Stapleton 250, 

251,272 
Hawthorne, Woodrow Tupper 314 
Hawver, Barbara Jane 314 
Hay, Mary Avella 31,191,202, 

203,314 
Hayden, Michael Eugene 232 
Haydon, Mary Phalen 210 
Hayes, Cambrai Shireen 384 
Hayes, Charles Eric 
Hayes, Glenn Stuart 
Hayes, Helen Elizabeth 208 
Hayes, Valerie Ann 192,384 
Haynes, Debra Lee 
Havnes, Jeffrey Harrison 
Haynes, Stan Musial 353 
Haynie, Donna Lorraine 384 
Haynie, Gayle Winters 315 
Haynie, Hugh Smith 
Hays, Scott Thomas 
Hayward, Donald M. 
Haywood, Susan Elizabeth 
Hazard, Charlotte Wooldridge 

288 
HazelgTove, Karen Ann 192 
Healy, Donald Raymond 
Healy, John Martin 
Healy, Marjorie Norgaard 
Heaps, Charles William 
Heath, Barbara Jane 
Heath, Barbara Schroeder 
Heaviside, Michael WiUiam 
Heck, Albert William 230,246 
Hecker, Janene 315 
Hedelt, Anne Garden 384 
Hedley, Harold H. 
Hedrick, Karen Elizabeth 397 
Heeren, Jerome Donald 
Heiberg, Dana E. 220 
Heim, Deborah Lynne 268 
Heldt, Cynthia 200,250,251 
Helff Eric Landers 369 
Hellman, John Robert 232,315 
Helms, Susan Marie 
Heldt, Cynthia Ann 315,272 
Helseth, Glenn O. 
Helslcy, William Wesley 283 
Hemley, Ginette 353 
Henderson, Diana Elizabeth 107, 

315,108 
Henderson, Donald Grey 
Henderson, Franklin Daniel 
Henderson, Mark Joseph 315 
Henderson, Michael S. 
Hendrick, Keith David 217 
Hendrickson, George Daniel 
Hendrix, Stephen Cole 
Hengen, Richard Lawrence 
Henley, Deborah Sue 384,272 
Henley, Nancy Catherine Haga 
Hennelly. Kevin Joseph 
Hennessy, Mary Elizabeth 208, 

369,152,163 
Hennessy, Michael Patrick 267 
Hennessy, Robert Patrick 
Hennigar, Harold Frank 
Henning. Lisa June 128 
Henry. Brenda Lee 210 
Henry. Kathleen Bridget 384 
Henry, Michael Chip 216.315 
Henrv. Patricia Anne 369 
Hcon. Robert Scott 230,263 
Hepplcr, Wesley R. 397 
Hepworth, Martha Ann 



Herald. Mary Clare 2.50,272 
Heretick, Stephen Edward 
Herkness. Diane Beth 25,197, 



Hemdon HI, Claude Clinton 

.384 
Herring, Albert Augustus 212, 

213 
Herrington, Deborah Ann 
Herrmann, Cecilia Kristine 369 
Herro, Greg John 
Hershey, Caroline Leigh 
Hershey, Paul Christian 
Hertzog. David William 
Hervas, Dedrick Mark 274 
Hesaltine, Scott Charles 
Hess, Cheryl Lee 195 
Heslerman. Kimberly Lea 384 
Hethcock, Elizabeth Anne 369 
Hcvder, Ella Gertrud 
Hcyser, Maryann 3IS,1%,197 
Hickey m, David Joseph 315. 

216 



226 

Hicks. Jr.. Russell Wayne 

Hidalgo. Diego Jesus 

Hiebert. Therese Margaret 

Hietanen. Edwin Dale 

Higger. Harriett Joyce .384 

Higginbotham. Ann Adair 315, 
197 

Higgins, Daniel Chisholm 

Higgins, Edith Robin 369 

Higgins, Linda Shawn 316 

Higgins, Patricia Anne 384 

Hilbrink, Mark David 369 

Hilgers, Shauna Lynn 

Hill, Carol Diane 397 

Hill, Cherie Elaine 

Hill, Deborah Anne 363,210;297 

HUl, Elizabeth Ann 384 

Hill, Howard Hamner 274 

Hill, Jeanne Marie 

Hill, Linda Lea 315,181 

Hill, Ruth Whitmore 

Hill, Scott Knight 

Hill, Virginia Anne 

Hilldrup, Lee Pendleton 353 

Hillery, Pamela Ann 384 

Hilliker, Alan Davy 353,108 

Hilscher, Kathleen Joyce 

Hilaee, Elaine Judith 3.53,203 

Hilton, Carol Ann 353 

Hinde, Priacilla 

Hinds, David E. 

Hines, Marc Cambridge 316, 
219,249 

Hitmant, Henry Coleman 

Hinson, Loretu Abbott 

Hmtz, Steven Jeffrey 315 

Hinz, MariKn Kay 

Hirata, Peter Manabu 

Hirsch, David -Alan 369 

Hirschhorn, Daniel 

Hirschi, Kathy Lynn 315,109 

Hirschman, Lvnne Diane 384.206 

Hissey. David Scott 219 

HISTORY STUDENTS' ORGAN- 
IZATION 114 

HitchingB. Laurence Davis 

Hite ni. James Eppa 

Hixon. Donna J. 

Hixon. James Andrew .397 

Hoag. George Timothy 219 

Hockett, Chris B. 

Hodge. Deborah Ann 

Hodge. Deborah Lee 315.210 

Hodges. James Edward 239 

Hodges. Simon Christopher 

Hoechner. Carol Ann 353,192 

Hoeg, Matthew Luke 263 

Hoffman, David Xavier 

Hoffman. Josephine Theresa 363. 
124 

Hoffman. Kenneth Charles 

Hoffman. Kenneth Ignatius 

Hoffman. William Charles 

Hoffmann. Paul Stuart 213 

Hoffschwelle. Mary S. 

Hoge, Barbara Merv 

Hogendobler. James Matthew 384 

Hogge. Karen Gur\nch 

Hogge. Jr.. Leais Herbert 3.53. 
222.223.415.109 

Hogsgaard. [ngrid 

Hogshead. Nancy Jo .384 

Hogue. Cheryl Ann 

Hokomb. PhyllU Ann 353 

Holden. Frederick J. 

Holder. John Kenneth 

Holder, Tamara Anne 200.256. 

Holladay. Cary Catharine -3.53. 




Index/405 



195,152,153 
Holland. David S. 
Holland, Deborah Askew 
Holland, Fred Anthony 
Holland, Jonathan Gregg 219 
Holland. Jr., William Robert 

315 
Hollar, Donna Raye 3.53,192 
HoUberg. Maris Daniel 
HoUeran. Mary Theresa 272 
Hollingsworth. Lawrence A. 
HoUingsworth. Michael 

McKeehan 
Holly. Moira Charlotte 369,181 
Holm. William Michael 
Holman, Melinda Kay 384 
Holmberg, Thomas James 266,267 
Holmes, Audrey Dale 315 
Holmes, Catherine Elizabeth 369 
Holmes, Emanuel Clabon 397 
Holmes, Ronald Henry 
Holmgren, John Stephen 353 
Holsinger, John William 369. 

219 263 
Holt. Amy Tredway 364.136 
Holt. Clarice L. 
Holt. Sally Ann 276.277 
Holthouse. Rita Joan 
Holton, Deborah .Joyce 
Holtzclaw, Shervl Wilson 354, 

203 
Holzbaur, Erika Lynn Faith 
Horn, Lai Yee 
HOME 12-13 
Homewood HI, George Morgan 

315,120 
Honaker, Karen W. 
Honeycutt, Margaret Crews 
HONOR COUNCIL 135 
HONORARIES 106-109 
Hood, Alison Keller 384 
Hood, Melaina Lavem 277 
Hooker, Karen Ann 
Hoover, Gary Paul 354 
Hoover, Lisa Diane 
Hopke. John Alfred 283 
Hopkins, David Emerson 315, 

220,221 
Hopkins, Diane Elizabeth 315, 

108 
Hopkins, Edward Allman 
Hopkins, Edward Reed 
Hopkins, Elizabeth Ann 
Hopkins, Glen Aaron 
Hopkins, Kevin R. 
Hopkins, Sharon Marie 
Hopkins, Stephen O'Bryan 37 
Hopkins. Susan Elaine 
Hopkins. Jr., William Benjamin 
Hopper, Ellen Louise 369,200 
Horn, Thomas WilUam 397 
Home, Cynthia Louise 
Home, Patricia Lynne 384 
Homer, Jean Lynn 
Homsby EI. John WUliam 315, 

219 
Horovitz, Jonathan Samuel 239, 

217 
Horst. .Jack Duncan 230,267 
Horton, Jr„ Charles Edwin 225 
Horton, Jr., Kenneth Taylor 

108 
Horton, Michel Yves 
Hosier, Barbara Kay 354 
Hostetler, Elizabeth Sue 
Hotter, Jr.. Joseph John 
Houck. Margaret Amelia 354 
Hough. Cynthia Ann 316 
Hough. Jan Elizabeth 316 
Howard. Judith Lvnne 364,210 
Howard, Susan Lynn 354,277 
Howard, Wanda Susan 369 
Howarth, Jan Allison 384,210 
Howder, Christine Marie 
Howe, Amanda Leigh 369 
Howe, Katharine Cartwright 384, 

206 
Howe, Paul Brooks 384 
Howe, Tom Brent 
Howell, David Wayne 
Howell, Mark Hunter 316,151 
HoweU, Jr.. Ralph Leroy 384 
Howren. Jr., Donald Ramon 
Hoxie, Kathleen M. 
Hoyt, Ann Louise 354 
Hoyt, David Painter 369.249 
Hml, Peter Frederick 
Hsieh, Bernard Bor-Nian 
Hubbard, Jeffrey Miller 
Hubbard. Mary Ann 
Huber. Michael Russell 
Hucul. Teena Rose 369,118 
Huddleston. Jon David 384 
Hudnall. Karen Lynn 
Hudson. David Anthony 384 
Hudson, Donna Jean 
Huennekens, Kevin Robert 397 
Huggins, Steven Francis 



Hughes, Carol C. 

Hughes. Cynthia Lynne 

Hughes. Stephanie Suzanne 354 

Hughey, Sara Evelyn 

Huk, Romana Christina 194.369, 

195 
Hull, Barbara B. 
Hull. Rick Lee 
Hull, Wayne Alan 
Hullinger. Hallett G. 
Hume. Donna Lynn 316.210 
Humphries, Carol Collier 354, 



272 
Hunley, Deborah Ann 
Hunt, Frances Anne 369,200, 

248,275 
Hunt, Katherine Elizabeth 
Hunt. Linda Allen 
Hunt. Richard Stoddard 354 
Hunt, Robert Arthur 
Hunt, Jr., Sherman Jack 
Hunter, James Andrew 
Hunter, John William 
Hunter. Kathleen Ann 397 
Hunter, Robin Lisa 316,197 
Huntley, Kristen Sue 369,200. 

255 
Huntsman, Laurie Ann 316,151 
Huq. Mohammad Saiful 
Huribert, Jeanne Stafford 384 
Hurley, Helen Ann 384 
Hurley, Timothy Edward 232,274 
Hurst, Michael Eric 354,124 
Hurt, Rebecca Susan 316 
Huschle. Anne Marie 166 
Hustcd. Ann Louise 384,206 
Hutcheson, Douglas Pauli 190, 

235 
Hutcheson HI, John Redd 
Hui, Christopher William 316, 

107,127,160,108,109 
Hux, Michael Marcellus 316 
Hyder, Mary Colin 316 
Hydinger, Karen Dale 
Hyle, Jr.. John Richard 
Hymes, Deborah Lynn 354 
Hyndman, Gerald Spencer 316 



I 



lanni. Daniel Joseph 316.235 
latridis, Aristidis 384 
im. Richard Alan 114,230 
lida, Yuri Anna 
Dgenfritz, Deborah Lee 354 
Hloweky, Jerome E. 
INDEX 400-413 
Inge, Vickie Cheryl 
Ingram, Gary Lynn 
Ingram, Gregory Wayne 
Inserra, Pamela Joanne 354 
INTRODUCTION 2 
Irby, Jon Wade 
Irby, Sara G. 
Ireland, James Frederick 
Irick, Todd Joel 278 
Irving. James Vincent 
Isaacs. Stacey Ann 354 
Isadore, Megan Elizabeth 
Iversen, Annette Sue 
Ivey, Nancy Louise 



J 



Jack, Jeri Lee 384 
Jackson, Barbwa Elaine 354 
Jackson, Brent Alan 316.131 
Jackson. Cecilia 369,197 
Jackson. Emily Louise 
Jackson, Mary Ellen 
Jackson, Melissa Ann 316 
Jackson. Robert Wayne 
Jackson, William Dickson 316 
Jacobs, Cheryl Faye 
Jacobs, Raymond Andrew 



Jacobs, Sharon Lee 316.107.192 
Jacobeen, Lora Jean 384,204 
Jacobson, Charles Frederic 
Jacobson, Susan Elizabeth 369 
Jacoby, Teresa Marie 206 
Jacocks, Anne Covington 316, 

415 
Jacquin, Stephen Burroughs 369 
Jaffee, Norman Bernard 
Jaraerson, Savanna Lynn 
James, Alfteda Samira 
James, Donnelle Eileen 
James, Patricia 384.197 
James, Ted Alan 
James, Thomas Marshall 
Jamieson, James 
Jarvie. Lisa Marie 369.195 
Jaynes, Laura Anne 
Jean-Michel, Jr.. Marc 283 
Jear, Nancy Gwan 
Jefferson, M. Jean 
Jenkins. Barry Lee 397 
Jenkins, Chairassia Melita 
Jenkins, David Henry 
Jenkins, Frances Lynn 316.192 
Jenkins, Julie Baker 277 
Jenkins, Marv Patricia 
Jenkins, Michael 316,217 
Jenkins, Pamela Ann 354 
Jenkins, Scott Jason 385 
Jenkins, Tammy Elizabeth 316 
Jenks, Kristen Harcharik 
Jennings, Ann Marie 385 
Jennings, Jr., Graham Thornton 

397 
Jennings, Nancy Eppea 309.195 
Jennings, Patricia Susan 316 
Jennings, Sara Elizabeth 
Jennings, Sheryll Louise 316, 

196,197 
Jermain, Patricia Ellen 
Jessee, Hazel H. 
Jest«r, David Lee 369 
Jett, Mary Noland 
Jett, Starke 
Jewell, Debra Lorraine 354, 

209,208 
Jiganti, John Joseph 270 
JiUson, Andrew Evan 
Jillson, Katherine Fekula 
Jingo, Barbara Jean 209,208 
Joaristi, Pedro Celeatino 
Johann, Cornelia Olga 354,192 
Johns in, Vamer Jay 
Johnson, Brent Mitchell 316 
Johnson. Carol Lin 316,192 
Johnson, Ctiroie S. 
Johnson, Catherine- Sylvia C. 

Johnson, David Dudley 239,228 
Johnson, David Jerome 354 
Johnson, Deborah Cay 
Johnson, Eric Mark 317 
Johnson, Helen Griffin 317 
Johnson HI, James Henry 317. 

232 
Johnson, James Roy 
Johnson, Jean Marie 369 
Johnson, Jr., Joseph Hilliaid 
Johnson, Karen Ann 385,255 
Johnson. Kathleen Ann 354.208 
Johnson, Kimberly Ann 385 
Johnson, Linda Marie 317,415 
Johnson, Marjorie Felt 
Johnson, Mary Sue 385 
Johnson, Melinda Gail 354 
Johnson, Raymond Harrell 
Johnson. Richard A. 
Johnson, Robert William 
Johnson, Sara Marie 385.131 
Johnson, Treazure Roberta 317, 

210 
Johnson, Wendy Ann 
Johnston, Cindy Lou 210 
Johnston, Jr., James Joseph 
Johnston, Jamie Susem 385 
Johnston, Marie J. 
Johnston, Paul Joseph 
Johnston, Robert Alexandria 
JoUey, Susan Elizabeth 370, 

250.261 
Jonak, Amy Tribble 152 
Jones, Bonnie 
Jones, Brian Randall 
Jones. Bruce Leroy 317,127 
Jones, Caroline Gibbes 370, 

135.197 
Jones, Catherine Margaret 370, 

200,243 
Jones, CeciUa Carr 317 
Jones, Jr., Charles Franklin 

370,225 
Jones, Cheryl Anne 
Jones, David Lee 317,75,135, 

226 
Jones, David Trevor 
Jones, Donald George 354,226 
Jones, Edney Spencer 213,283 



Jones, James Alien 

Jones, James Harrington 385 

Jones. Joanne Paris 370,208 

Jones, John Carter 

Jones, Joyce Anne 370 

Jones. KatJileen Marv 345,126, 

203 
Jones, Kimberly Ann 
Jones, Laura Elisabeth 
Jones, Laurie Mae 
Jones. Linda Kay 355 
Jones, Mae Mitchell 
Jones, Mark Graham 
Jones, Mary Jane 
Jones, Maurice Anthony 
Jones, Michael Patrick 249 
Jones. Richard Lee 
Jones, Robert Leslie 385.124 
Jones, Jr., Robert Scarritt 
Jones, Samuel E. 
Jones, Stephanie Colleen 255, 

206 
Jonea, Stuart W. 
Jonsson. Jon Eirik 
Jordan, Andrew Howard 
Jordan. Constance Arme 370 
Jordan, Debra Jean 385 
Jordan, Kenneth Nathan 
Jorgensen. Janet Lynn 318,203 
Jorgenson, Robert William 
Jose, Douglas Brian 
Joyce, Albert John X31 
Joyce, Benjamin C. 
Joyce, Donald 
Joyce, Ellen Mary 318,195 
Joyner, Jr.. James 0. 
Joyner. Sarah Celeste 318,31 
Judge, Joseph Mitchell 318 
Judv. Francis Newman 
Jung. Dorothy Mina 318,91,107 
Junghans, Lida Ferguson 355 
Juran, Marlane 



K 



, jeannette Rosche 
Kain, Philip James 213,216 
Kalaris, Peter Evan 246 
Kaluzsa, Karen Louise 
Kamandulis, James .Joseph 
Kameoka, Judy Yuko 318 
Kaminsky, Lauren J. 
Kang, Myong Kyu 318 
Kania, Janctte Eva 365 
Kania, Michael Vincent 318 
Kanner, Selma 
Kapetan, Jon Nick 
Kaplan, Paul D. 



ICAPPA DELTA 204-205 
KAPPA DELTA PI 116 
KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 206- 

207 
KAPPA SIGMA 216-217 
Karas. Stephanie Ann 370 
KARATE CLUB 130 
Karch, Beverly Hunter 397,108, 

109 
Karlson, Laurie Howe 210 
Karr. Russell D. 
Kashner, Dean Earl 
Kasmer, John Martin 
Kaasabian, Lynne A. 318.164 
Kast. David Shrevc 318,286 
Katson, Demetra Irene 151 
Katz, Elizabeth Elaine 370 
Katzman, David Evan 385 
Kaut, David Pippin 355 
Kaut, Jonathan Edo 
Kauzlarich, Susan Mary 355 
Kavanagh, Veronica Mary 318, 

195 
Kazanjian, Laurie Lee 277 
Kazemi. Zohreh 386,192 
Keating, Eileen Patricia 370 
Keating, Jr.. John A. 
Keating, Norecn 318,108 
Keaton. Mary Margaret 386 
Keays, Martha Sweet 318 
Keel, Florence Patricia 
Keen. Maty Elizabeth 318,208 
Keenan, Peter Joseph 261 
Keener, Karl Harry 
Kehoe, Mark Richard 286 



Keiter, Bryan David 370 
Keister, Mary Arm 
Keith, David Curtis 131 
Keith. James Robert 
Kelbly, Kevin Klair 
Kelin, Howard Lee 163 
Keller, Nancy Norene 355 
KeUer. Warren 
Kelley. David Noel 
Kellev. Gwynneth Davies 
Kelley, Kathleen Marie 318, 

230,264 
Kelliher, Michael Joseph 219 
Kellogg, Patricia Ann 355 
Kelly, Alison Yvonne 318.195 
KeUy, Charles Alan 222 
Kelly. Deborah Lynn 
Kelly. Donald H. 
Kelly. Frances LeUa 202,203 
Kelly, John Patrick 239,228 
Kelly, Joy Ellen 318,281 
Kelly, Julia C. 160 
Kelly, Patricia L. 
Kelly, Sharra Stewart 195,250, 

272 
Kelly, William Terence 
Kenan, Daniel James 125 
Kenaston. Thomas Michael 370 
Kendall, David Reid 
Kendrick, Charles Leonard 267 
Kenley. Gregory Grant 
Kennetly, Alexander Kirkland 
Kermedy, Ann Marie 
Keimedy, John Francis 
Kennedy, John Martin 319,267 
Kennedy, Karen Mary 397 
Kennedy, Kevin 136 
Kennedy, Michele Rodes 355 
KenneUv. Mary Estelle 370 
Kenny. Judith Ellen 200 
Kent. Andrea Lee 355,197,108 
Kepchar, Barbara Fox 355 
Kephart. Lone Ann 
Kem. Nancy Camille 398 
Kem. Stephen Christian 370 
Kemkamp, Elisabeth Dorothea 
Kems, Elizabeth Anne 319 
Keroack, Robert Henry 319,149, 

41.5,283 
Ken, Debra Elizabeth 
Kerr, Kevin John 
Kessler. Leonard 398 
Kestenbaum, Sue 
Ketcham, Linda Sue 
Kettenburg. Carol Ann 
Keyes, Leslie Shawn 116,212, 

213 
Keyes, Mitzi Jean 
Kidwell, Valerie Catherine 276 
Kiisk, Linda Mae 319,206,386 
Kiley, Ann Kevin 
Kiley. Kevin P. 
Kilgore. PhiUip Arthur 365, 

136,235 
Kiiian. Connie Ann 385 
Kilkowski, Barry John 
Kim. Irene Elizabeth 386 
Kim. James Y. K. 
Kim, Kwang Ho 
Kim, Yong Simg 
Kim, Yun Suk 
Kimble, Antonia Lobdell 
Kimbrough, Doris Renate 355 
Kinde, Jeannette Gayle 319 
King, Carole Ann 370,236 
King, Christopher Simon 232 
King, David Scott 319 
King, Donna Lee 
King. Evans Leon 
King n, George Robert 273 
King, John Ward 
King, Jon Bradley 
King, Katharine Ann 
King, Kristin 
King, Marcus Lee 
King n, Marion Kirwan 219 
King. Milton Everett 
King, Peter Allen 
King, Polly E. 
King. Robin Renee 370,191. 

King, Sharon Ijmne 319,208 
King, William Edward 
Kingsley, Neil Robert 319,107, 

220 
Kmgsley, Suzanne Marie 
Kinkead, Alan Robert 
Kinner, Catherine Mary 370 
Kinney, Jr., Harry Adrian 
Kinsel, Dennis Allen 
Kinsey. Jr., Carroll Hughes 398 
Kinsey, Chanda Lynn 398 
Kirby. David Bruce 
Kirby, Virginia Frances 355 
Kirk, David Woodson 319 
Kirkland, Larry Eugene 
Kirkley, Evelyn Anne 386 
Kirkpatrick, Douglas Andrew 



406/Index 



355.149,415.109,283 
Kim, Geraldine Marie 319 
Kirsch, Jr.. John Mitchell 
Kiahbaugh, John Eric 
Kitch, Russell David 355 
Kitchen, Allan Clayton 355,133 
Kitchen, John Howard 319,222 
Klapper, Elva Elizabeth 
Klatt. Keith Anthony 
Klein, Garry Wade 319 
Kleopfer, Carolyn Jean 
Klett, Mary Elizabeth 385 
Kline. Andrew J. 
Klingmever, Jr., Wilbert 

Anthony 385 
Kloeden, Martin Paul 385 
Knapp, Cheston David 273 
Knapp HI. Frederick Alanson 

319,219,273 
Knauer. Patricia Lynn 355,385 
KnauBs, Thomas Russell 398 
Kneidinger, Michael Otto 239, 

228 
Kneuper. Rayna Louise 355,204 
Knight, Butler S. 
Knight. Gary Elizabeth 319 
Knoble, Karen Ann 
KnoUmann. Thomas Carl 320,222 
Knott, Kathryn Elizabeth 370,206 
Kobayashi. Turner Maaaru 
Koe, Karen Elizabeth 
Koeteveld. Monique Jacoba 

Emma 
Kolakowski. Charles Peter 215 
Kolantie. Irene 365,195 
KoUmansperger. Elizabeth 



278 
Komitor, Jeffrey Brian 355 
Komorowski, Elaine Anne 
Kondak, Charles 
Kondracld, Carol Ann 195 
Kongshaug, Nils Hartley 
Konstantinou. John Dimitrios 
Koontz, James W. 
Kopelove. Pamela Beth 370,125 
Kopocis, Kenneth John 
Korb. Lois Elizabeth 370 
Koeakowfiki. Bernard James 370 
KoBs, Phillip Arthur 
Koatrzewsky, Gregory J. 
Kotelec, Michael Theodore 
Koury, Barbara Ann 355 
Koval, Douglas Charles 320,215 
Kowalski, G«ra!d Mark 126,127 
Kowalski, Mark S. 
Krache, Elizabeth Mary 320 
Kraemer, Ronald Everett 385, 

246 
Kraft, Paul Stanley 
Kramer m, Walter Frederick 

320,190.206.226.109 
Krantz. David Eugene 320,215 
KrauB, Deanna Lynne 355 
Krause, Karen Marie 320 
Kravitz, Michael Joseph 
Kravitz, Robert Aaron 
Kraynak, Karla Jean 370,204 
Krcelic, Tammy Marie 320 
Kreider, David Allen 
Krest, Kathleen 
Kieter, Dennis G. 
Krieger, Barbara 370 
Krigbaum, Vicki Carol 
Kroeger. Jr., John Francis 
Krohn, Richard Henry 160,163 
Krotaens, Mareha Vandyke 
Kruse, Jeffrey David 
Krysa, Caroline Louiee 
Kuc, David Allen 321 
Kucan, Nancy Marie 370 
Kuehn, Mark Stuart 
Kuelz. Karl Weldon 
Kuemmerle, John Francis 274 
Kuhna, Philip Laurence 
Kulish. Mark 370 
Kuntz, Patricia Ann 321.108 
Kimz, Heidi Martha 355 
Kurgvel, Karin Mai 
Kurtz, Charles Dean 219 
Kurtz, Chriatine Annalise 356, 

107,140 



L 



Lacey. Richard Ellis 
Lacey. Shelagh Marie 
Lacy. Jr., Mason Harden 398 
Lacv, Robert Kimbrough 321, 

136,225.109 
Lacy. Tamara Darlene 321,131 
Ladd. Ford C. 

Lagomarcino. Leslie Karen 385 
Lagrone, Michael Miller 
Lagrotteria, Joseph Francis 
Lahs. Laura Ann 321 
Lahue, Laurence Holt 
Laibstain, Harold Irvin 
Laioie, John Thomas 321 
Lake. Mary Beth 
Lakin, Michael Alan 321 
Lam. Deborah Elizabeth 321,308 
Lam. Perry Ping Son 321.235 
Lamb. Beth Hughes 
Lamb, Gloria Lee 
Lambardo. Donna Lynn 321 
LAMBDA CHT ALPHA 218 
Lambe. Christoper Scott 
Lambert. Beatrice Scott 321 
Lambert. Jean Marie 370 
Lambert. Leonard Robert 
Lambert, Michael Carson 
Lambiaao, James Vincent 
Lamkin, Stanley Lee 
Lamm, Claudia Marie 
Lamm, Sara Alisa 277 
Lamond. Heather Jean 321 
Lampert. Patricia Leigh 321 
Land, Aubrey P. 
Lane, Chama B. 
Lane, Cindy Jo 
Lane. Jr.. Kenneth William 
Lane, Peter Lionel Roger 220, 

157 
Lang, Alvis 241 
Lang, Cheryl Jean 203 
Lang, Duncan MacKtnlay 
Lang, Linda Sue 
Langford, David Allen 321,222 
Langford, Karen Leigh 370 
Langford. Nancy Ann 370 
Langhome HI, Robert Kemp 
Langlois, Allen Joseph 
Langston, Laura Hill 385 
Lamer, Mark Vincent 
Lank, Patricia Ann 210 
Lanning, Ruth Eileen 
Lanzano. Karina-Maria Cecilia 
Lanzilotta, Dolores Maria 
Laparo, Susan Patricia 385 
Lapkin, Glenn Jay 385,124,285 
LapoUa. Mark Oreste 
Laray, Thomas Stuart 
Lariach. Craig R. 259 
Lark. Joseph Andrew 321,107. 

124,109 
Larkin, Maureen Ascecilia 355, 

206 
Larocque, Eldward Francis 
Larsen, Clarice Marie 
Larsen, Susan Joyce 
Larson, Daryl Anne 321 
Larson 11, Jerold Joseph 228 
Larson. Leslie Ann 370 
Larson, Melissa Anne 321,210 
Larue, Jennifer Gayle 355,204 
Larue, Mary Shawn 
Lascara, Vincent Joseph 
Lascara. Virginia Anna 370 
Lash, Richard Anthony 
Lasky. Michael Steven 398 
Lassen. Thor John 
Lassiter, Mark Timothy 355 
Lastowski, Robert Francis 
Laszlo, Cristina Patricia 
Lau. Jeanett L. 
Lauck, Elise Susanne 321 
Laude, Michael Ernst Herbert 
Laudise. Thomas Michael 226 
Lauer, Kurt Alan 
Laurence. Kirk A. 109 
Laurent, Harold J. 
Laver, Kurt Alan 321 
Lawler, Lise Margaret 355 
Lawlor, Kathleen Ann 321,197, 

244 
Lawrence, Susan Stephanie 386 
Lawson, Jean B. 
Lawson. Joy Lanette 386 
Lawson, Marinda Gay 386 
Lawson, Peggy Annette 370,192 
Lawton, Alicia D. 192 
Layden, Karen Marie 
Layman. Nancy Milliarme 355 
Layne, Carolyn Doris 321,200 
Layne. EHzabeth Hope 370,208 
Layne. Karen Joanne 
Layne. Linda Carol 321.197 
Lazar, Robert Leonard 
Lazarow. Linda Lee 
Leach, Alicemary CHara 
Leaf, Barbara Anne 355 
Uaf, Mary Beth 321.200.34 



Leahy, Joyce Margaret 370 
Leahy, Richard Edward 370 
Leahy, Richard George 
Leap'trot. Kevin Gregory 386 
Leardo. Richard Joseph 355,235 
Leary. Patricia M. 
Leblanc. Claire Renee 255,281 
Lebolo. Lucille P. 
Lecain, Denise Marie 386 
Leckey, Mary Katherine 195 
Leclair, Lawrence 
Leclerc. Martin Gerard 321 
Ledwith. Brian John 322,235. 

267 
Ledwith. Jr.. James Joseph 
Lee, Katherine Diane 
Lee, Lai Man 
Lee m, Robert Withers 
Lee. Virginia Ann 208 
Leemon. Paul Kevin 
Leeper, Elizabeth Ann 
Leffler, Lance L. 
Leftwich. Theresa Lee 386.208 
Legard, William David 370,132 
Leggett, Jr., Albert Thomas 
Lehman. Michael T. 
Lehr. Kathryn Mary 250.272 
Leighty, Brian David 
Leinbach, Tracy Ann 284 
Leinberry, Gayle A. 322,125, 

200 
Leiscb, Doris M. 
Leisch, Juanita Mary 322 
Leister, Katherine Carol 386 
Leivonen, Barbara Ann 
Lemaster, Alison 195 
Lemon. Bonnie Kim 355,208 
Lemon, Linda Carole 386.264 
Lenhart. Cynthia Rae 
Lenhart, Michael Blaine 
Lennert, Alvin Lynn 
Leonard. James Montgomery 
Leonard, Susan A. 
Leone, Lisa H. 322 
Lesher, Kimberly Lee 197 
Less, Joanne Reid 
Letendre, Charlene Alison 370, 

204 
Letendre, Jacqueline Aim 386 
Letsky, William David 
Lettner. Loretta Lynn 
Letzer, Jeffrey Paul 
Leverenz, Julia B. 
Levin, Maria 386 
Levine. Jonathan Gershon 
Levine. Katherine M. 
Levy in, Ed^ar Sidney 
Lewandowski, Leslie Ann 277 
Lewis, James Clayton 398 
Lewis, Janice Diane 322,108 
Lewis, Lori Kay 355.272 
Lewis, Mara J. 
Lewis, Margaret 322 
Lewis, Nancy Downing 370 
Lewis, Nora Elaine 
Lewis m, Oren Ritter 
Lewis, Rebecca Joy 210 
Lewis, Susan Butler 370 
Lewis, Susan Deane 
Lewis, Warren Hale 370 
Lex, Timothy Arthur 
Leydig, Gary William 
Lia, Douglas Francis 
Libassi. Steven Anthony 239 
Libby, John Andrew 
Lieder, Lynn Marie 355,206 
LIFESTYLES 14 
Light, Carlene Adelle 
Lile, Laird Andrew 386.124 
Lilly, Steven Keith 
Lim, Sung-Kun 226 
Limerick, Jr.. Lester Lee 322. 

226,242 
Lin. Kathryn Rita 322 
Lindherg, Jon W. 
Lindemann. Anna Margrethe 355 
Linderer, Cynthia Ann 
Lindsay, Bruce D. 
Lindsay, Opie David 
Lindsay, Paula Gladys 322 
Lindsay, Walton Carlyle 273 
Lindsley, Ruth Luise 
Lindstrom. Frederick James 
Line, Susan Elizabeth 370,204 
Linke, Regan Roes 
Linnane, Michael Forrest 
Lint, Catherine Anne 322.147 
Lipford, Carla Renee 355 
Lippard. Ann E, 
Lipscomb, Catherine Lee 
Liptak, Robert James 398 
Lipton, Douglas W. 
Listrom, Janine Elizabeth 365, 

45 
Litman, Diane Judith 356 
Littauer, Dwayne Orton 356 
Litten, Jonathan Jay 
Little. Alice Travis 



Little, Amy Pendleton -386.197. 

415 
Little. Michael William 225 
Little. Patrick Joseph 225 
Littlejohn, Margaret Lindsav 

322.200 
Litz, Kimberly Cassie 
Litzinger, Julie Anne 
Liu, Joey Hsiu-Min 
Liu, Shao-Li 

Lloyd, Kathryn Gwenyth 109 
Lloyd, Marshall Davies 
Lobiondo, George Robert 
Lockamv, Cassandra Marchio 
Locke, John Rae 
Lockhart. Margaret J. 
Locklear, Winford Ross 
Loeb, Lisa Ellen 204 
Logan. Barbara G. 
Logue, Richard Craig 219 
Logue, Susan Marie 370,203 
Lohr, Matthew Joseph 
Lombard. Jonathan David 127 
Lombardo, Donna Lynn 208 
Long. Barry Leon 21,414.415 
Long, Edward Joseph 
Long, Jr., George Isaac 263 
Long, Lisa Bonner 386,203 
Long, Marie Ellen 370 
Long, Michael P. 
Long, Nanc^ Ellen 386 
Long, Veronica W. 
Longenbach, Edie Ann 277 
Longerbeam, Genevieve Eliza- 
beth 322 
Longest, Carol Faye 321.203 
Longworth, Katherine Stuart 

386 
Lopdrup, Kim Axel 356 
Lopez, Gisela Maria 206 
Lopez, Martin Luis 371 
Loredo, Jose 
Lorentson. Barbara Ann 
Lorenzo, Maximo 
Lorimer, Elizabeth Christina 

322 
Lorix. Keiley Robert 322,222 
Lott, Karl Jeffrey 
Lett, Megan Beth 204 
Loud, Kevin Robert 395.109 
Loughran, Christopher John 
Lovecchio, Nicholas Mark 
Lovegren, Susan Anne 200 
Lovell, Barrv Wade 
Loving, Catherine Ann 371 
Lowden, James Keen 386,415 
Lowdon, Leslie Ann 
Lowe, Mary Patricia 
Lowe, Scott Cameron 
Lowenstem. Evelyn Skillman 

371,210 
Lowman. Jr.. David St. Clair 
Lowrey. Haynie Lee 322 
Lowrie. Claire E. 272 
Lowry, Deborah Anne 386 
Lowiy, Jo Ellen 356 
Lozier. David James 322,107, 

124 
Lu, Ming-Yih 
Lubin, Katherine Louise 371. 

192,415 
Lucas, Constance Denise 
Lucas. Jr., David George 356, 

230,231 
Lucas, Janis Anita 
Lucas. Jeffrey Paul 356 
Ludwig, David F. 
Lueders. Mary Beth 386 
Lukin, Craig George 
Lull, Jeanne Elizabeth 356.3. 

Lundahl, Walter James 356.235 
Lunday. Jennifer Kaye 386,200. 

275 
Lundgren, Kathy Joyce 
Lundquist. Erik James 
Lundvall. Richard Goldaborough 

239,217 
Lunnv, Pamela Marguerite 356. 

415 



CUTION 50 
Lutz, Charies Talbott 222 
Lutz HI. Jacob Andrew 
Lutz, Richard Drake 
Lyden, Robert Joseph 230.231 
Lyles. William Patterson 371. 

232 
Lynch. David Hoeken 356 
Lynch. Linda 
Lynch. Rose Marie 356 
Lj-nn. Elizabeth Allan 371.203 
Lyon, jr., George Lester 398 
Lyon. James Vernon 
Lyon rn. Robert Leslie 322 



Lyons, Jolm Patrick 
Lyons, Kenneth 
Lyons. Timothy Joseph 
Lysher, Judith Ann 386 



M 



Maag, Susan Ann 109 
Macauley, Molly Kenna 322.107. 

41.5.108.109 
MacBrayne. David Bruce 220 
MacDonald. Ellen Virginia 371 
MacEachin. Alan Douglas 
Macedo, Stephen Joseph 322. 

222.108 
Macek, Paul Vladimir 356,127 
MacGillivray, Roderick P. 
MacGowan. Catherine Ann 356 
MacGowan, Timothy Grant 
MacHatton. Douglas Alan 322 
Macintosh, Elizabeth Bonnie 

MacKay. Ian Altister 322,222, 

306 
Mackhn, Paul R. 
Macko, Valerie Jean 322 
MacPherson, Jr., James Reeve 
MacPherson. Robert Douglas 
Madancy, Joyce Ann 356 
Maeger, Charles Bradford 
Maerker, Martha Elizabeth 371, 

192 
Magee, Mary Sue 356,208 
Maglieri, John Michael 
Maeri, Michael Barton 
Mahaffey, Julia Lynn 322,211, 

210 
Mahan. Robert George 
Mahan, Stephen Craig 
Maher. Christopher Alan 
Maher, Margaret Mary 
Maher, Martin Robert 
Maher. William Andrew 
Mahoney. Catherine Anne 
Majette. Robert Shawn 398 
MajiduUa, Zain 371 
Major, Robena Margaret 
Major, Sara Lee 271.121. 

195 
MAJORETTES 243 
Maker, Scott Winfield 
Makowski. Ann 322 
Maley, Julie Anne 
Mallard, Laval Lawrence 
Mallardi. Mary Diane 
Maltare, Michael John 386 
Mallison, Janet Blake 264.265 
MallisoQ m. William Henry 
Mallory, Lvnn Allison 386 
Malloy. Susan Eileen 322 
Malloy. Tracy Marceil 
Malone. John A. 385,253.283 
Maloney, Jeanne Marie 323 
Maloof, Sarah Jo 
Manaker, Cynthia Mary 371 
Manam. Sujata Veeraiah 
Manderfield. Joseph Brian 39. 

216.217,241.286 
Manderfield, Robert Vincent 

219 
Manes, Eric David 219.108 
Manetti. Howard Enrico 323,226 
Mangelsdorf, Louisa Ann 323 
Mangum, Rhia Dejuanna 
Manix. Susan Patricia 323.107. 

108.109 
Mann. Coralyn Gash 
Mann, John Davidson 278 
Mann. Katherine Randolph Leigh 
Mann, Jr.. Richard G. 
Manning, Stewart Cleaves 370 
Manrique. Fernando 
Mansfield, Dawn Lynn 
Manuel. Timothy Andrew 215 
Manzie. Agnes Maria 370 
Mapp. Elva Archer 
Mapp IV, George R. 
Mapp, Jr.. John Alfred 
Maraman, C>7ithia Leigh 371 
Marchant. Heather 
Marchbank. Robert Hugh 387.35. 

283 
Marchiano. Ellen Frances 371 
Marcotte. Marianne Theresa 

371.272 
Marcou. Mary A. 387 
Marenirk. Catherine .Ann 
Mftrgard in, Wemet Lercy 324 



Iiidex,/407 



Margolies, Jonathan Adam 
Marken, Jr.. Kenneth Ralph 
Markcy n, John 387,124,128 
Marks. Jr., Bryant Mayes 371, 

Marks. Susan Jean 371,192 
Marks, Thomas Charles 220 
Markwith, Glenn Paige 
Marlin, Elizabeth Jane 204 
Marling. Deborah Louise 356 
Marling, Elisabeth Margaret 

356 
Marone, Richard Anthony 
Marquez-Alba, Jr., Efren 
Marquis, Susan Lynn 387 
Mami, Bradley Phipps 387 
Marsh, Deborah Lea 289.195 
Marsh, Rebecca Patterson 
Marshall, Anne Randolph 
Marshall, Brenda Faye 371 
Marshall, Camille Elizabeth 
Marshall. David Jan-ell 324 
Marshall. Gary Stephen 
Marshall. Rhonda Ruth 
Marticlli. Susan Flair 324, 

195,152 
Martin, Beth Anne 
Martin, Christopher Patrick 

232 
Martin, David Franklin 387 
Martin, David Olin 
Martin. Gary Robert 324 
Martin. George Richard 324 
Martin, Jr.. Harold Greene 324, 

222 
Martin, Jesse Edward 
Martin m, John Marshall 124 
Martin, John Rothwell 
Martin, Kathryn Ann 371,204, 

205 
Martin, Mary Ehzabeth 
Martin, Mary Luella 200 
Martin, Melvin Darnell 239 
Martin, Mitchell Bryant 
Martin, Pamela Ann 387,195 
Martin, Shirley Elaine 
Martin, Susan Erin 371.166 
Martin, Susan Frances 
Martin, Teresa Diane 371,197 
Martin, Thomas Patrick 267 
Martin, William Hemdon 
Martinez, Jose Lorenzo 
Martinez, Laura Ann 371 
Martini, Douglas John 239 
Martino, Joyce 387 
Martorana, Jeffrey Thomas 324 
Martz, William Benjamin 
Marx, Carol Meth 398 
Maslin, Edward Foster 
Mason, Ann Marie 387 
Mason, Cheryl Lynn 371 
Mason, Christina Marie 324 
Mason, Michael Richard 216, 

217,249 
Massad, Charlotte Anne 
Massaro, Toni Marie 
Massengill, Susan Leigh 371 
Massey, Ann L. 
Massev. Elizabeth Ann 
Massey, Elizabeth Rives 324, 

195 
Massey, Hugh Davis 325 
Mast. Christopher Curtis 387 
Masters, Lora Jean 264 
Masterson HI, Charles Vincent 
Mastrobattista, Mary Patricia 

326 
Matawaran, Ramon Deguzman 
Mather, John Cotton 
Mathews, Thomas David 
Mathias, Barbara Glass 
Mathis, Keith Edmond 322 
Mathus. David L. 
Matson, Bruce H. 322,109 
Mattch, Pam 248 
Mattem, Lisa Anne 
Mattem, Louise Renee 
Matthaeus, WiUiam Henry 
Matthews, Barbara Renee 
Matthews, Beverly Starr 371 
Matthews, Gail Margaret 203 
Matthews, Lori Lynn 208 
Matthews, Mary Alice 325 
Matthews, Teresa Lynn 325,415 
Mattix. Larry 
Mattson, Alexandra Christine 

M. 387 
Mattson, Pamela Amanda 195,356 
Mauck, Pamela Jean 
Mauthe, Robert William 226 
Maxa. Bradley Alan 
Maxey, Catherine Jane 387 
Maxie, Margaret Arme 
Maxwell. Gladys J. 
May. Christine Collett 
May, David Bryant 
May, David Michael 
Mayberry, Thomas Sidwell 326, 



107,222,274 
Mays, Benjamin Wilson 366 
Mays, Eric Lee 
Mays, Gerald Wayne 
McAuliffe, Patricia Ann 371 
McAvoy, Laurie Hoover 387, 

206,250,272 
McBride. Jennifer Anne 356 
McBride, Nancy Anne 398 
McBride, Teresa Mary 398 
McCaleb, Mary Elizabeth 325, 

192 
McCallum, Douglas Evan 
McCandlcas, Sherri Dawn 325, 

136,109 
McCarthy, Fox 
McCarthy, Janet Elaine 325 
McCarthy, Joseph John 
McCauley, Mclinda Leigh 206, 

288 
McCauley, Patricia Ann 
McClanahan, Elizabeth Ann 372 
McClintock, Jr., Robert Orth 
McClure, David Patterson 190, 

McClure. James Edward 372,170 
McCoig. Jr., Dan Macey 
McCollum, Donna Beth, 356,108 
McConnell, Michael N. 
McCord, Bruce Royston 372,230 
McCorkie, Dorothy Martin 
McCormack, Margaret Louise 387, 

203 
McCormick, Kevin Charles 398 
McCoy, John Washington 356, 48 
McCoy, Louise Neil 
McCoy, Rebecca Ellen 387,192 
McCracken. Lois Lynn 356 
McCrory. James Willard 
McCue, Janet Kimberly 372 
McCulla, Clare Louise 398 
McCuUa, John Kennedy 325,232, 

249 



McCuUough, Edward Anthony 

398 
McCullough, John Miles 
McCusker, Douglas Edward 415 
McCutchan, Deborah Irene 
McCutcheon, Robin 325 
McDaniel, Charles Russell 
McDaniel, Sarah Claire 356 
McDaniel, Steven Willard 
McDaniels, Lisa 200 
McDermott, Diane Marie 
McDermott, Timothy G. 
McDevitt, Timothy Francis 
McDonald, Dianne Kayc 200 
McDonald, Douglas Bruce 48 
McDonald, John Edward 
McDonell, Scott Alan 217,283 
McDonnell. Charles Robert 
McDowell, Julie Ann 372, 

197 
McEachran HI, Daniel Ciu-tia 

356 
McElfresh, Virginia Dale 
McElhaney, Matthew Stuart 
McElligott, Mary Teresa 387, 



273 
McFaden, Leslie Diane 325,114 
McFalls, Anita Leblanc 
McFarlin, Robert Bruce 123, 

239,217,109 
McGann, Edward Gerard 387 
McOee, Janet Elizabeth 201, 

200,254,265 
McGee, John Patrick 
McGee, Steven James 131 
McGhee, Lester Collins 
McGibbon, Michael Lee 
McGibbon, Patrick Wayne 356, 

226,297,263 
McGinnis, Nora Lyrm 372,35 
McGinty, Cecilia Ann 326 



McGrane, Joan Elizabeth 
McGraw, Jr., Joseph Gordon 
McGuire. Helen J. 
McHcnry, Stephen Michael 217, 

273 
Mclnemey, Susan Marie 356 
Mclntire, Pamela Ellen 366 
Mcintosh, Diane Elaine 372 
Mclntyre, David Thomas 124 
Mclntyre, Maile Anne 372,192 
Mclver, Jr., Robert Morton 
McKenna. Robert Bruce 



263 
McKinney, David Duane 124 
McKinnon. Bill Hull 
McKnight, Eric Duane 
McLamb, Loftin W. 
McLane, Michael Nelson 356 
McLarty, Jr., William Hackson 
McLaughlin, Donald Joseph 
McLaughlin, Kristin Alexandria 
McLaughlin, Thomas James 
McLaughlin, William Woods 
McLeod, Jr., Edward Armand 366, 

273 
McLeod, Mark Alexander 
McLeod, Paul Joseph 325,11,330 
McMahon, Leslie Elizabeth 
McMahon, Theresa Lynn 325 
McManus, John Bryson 246 
McMath, Charles Francis 325 
McMath, Elizabeth Clarke 325, 

211,210 
McMenamin, Catherine Margaret 

366,210,108 
McMenamin, William James 
McMillan HI, Robert Hartcll 261 
McMurtan, Richard E. 
McNair, Cynthia Leigh 372 
McNall, Jean Caryl 325 
McNally, Catherine M. 
McNamee, Steven Edward 239 
McNeel, Caroline Jane 372 
McNeil, Tracy Anne 387 
McNeish, SaUie Campbell 109 
MeNew, Robert Bruce 398 
McNey. Elizabeth Jean 387 
McNinch. Sandra J. 
McPhaul. Kirby Louise 
McQuarry HI, Frank Arthur 

McSherry, Perry Boiling 387 
McVadon, Michelle Marie 
McWhorter, John A. 
McWilliam, Eileen 
Meachum. Susan Lee 126,366 
Mead, Spencer 

Meade, Elizabeth Grant 208,326 
Meade, James Sherwood 
Meador, Kathy Winn 196,356 
Meador. Thomas A. 
Meadows, Mark Edward 
Means, Kevin Mark 366 
Mears, Christopher Lynn 326 
MEDIA 142 

Meek, Deborah Ann 372,281 
Meike, Thomas Alan 
Meili, William Clifford 
Meldrum, Heather Thane 144, 

250,251,108,326,272 
Meller, Michael Peter 
Mellinger, Anne Katharine 372 
Mellis, Michael George 62 
Mellor, Larry Llewellyn 
Mellor, Wilmer S. 
Mellott. Christopher Rowe 
Mellott, Deborah Lynn 203,366 
Melrose, William Bruce 
Melton, Jr., William Floyd 
Meltzer, Arme Susan 
Melvin, Joyce A. 
Mendelsohn, Steve 
Mendez, Charles Paul 326,108 
Menkes, Bruce Norman 226 
Meola, Peter Joseph 
Merchent, Martha Elizabeth 

356 
Mercready, Mark Andrew 357 
Meredith, Susan Trumbo 
Merish, Lori Ann 197,387 
MERMETTES 180 
Merrifield, Latuie Sue 
Merrill, Linda Lee 
Merritt, Susan Lee 367 
Merry, Diane Ellen 367 
Medschke, Mark William 107. 

127,326 
Meybohm, Robert Stephen 
Meyer. Carl Robert 127,248, 

367 
Meyre, Cathy Elizabeth 
Meyer. David 387 
Meyer, Eric Lewis 52,249,372 
Meyer, James Alderaon 
Meyer, John David 
Meyer, Kenneth William 
Meyer, Sheryl 242,357 
Meyers, Ira Douglas 263,283 
Miante, Cheryl Ann 192,326 
Miante, Paula Renee 387 
Miante, Richard Daniel 
Michelland, JcBrey F. 131 
Middleton, Laurie Arm 
Middleton, Robert W. 249 
Midland, Susan Marie 
Mika, Andrew Joseph 387,263 
Mikol, Joseph Albert 
Milam, Jeffrey Lynn 



Miler, Gail Luhring 
Miles, Joan Mary 367 
Miles, Karen Ccyner 
Milik, Joel Thomas 
Millard, Becky Lou 387 
Miller, Alexandra Gates 
Miller, Autumn Cheryl 196,326 
Miller, Beverly Bowen 
Miller. Darrell James 398 
Miller, Elizabeth Vaughan 276, 

357 
Miller, Gretchen Anne 
Miller, Joaon L. 
Miller, Kathleen 372 
Miller, Kathleen Anne 326 
Miller, Linda Lee 204,326 
Miller, Marika Teresa 203 
Miller, Martha Ann 
Miller. Mary-Jane 387 
Miller, Rebecca Anne 203,372 
Miller. Sharon Annette 326 
Miller, Susan Carol 
Miller, Susan Diane 
Miller, Timothy James 263, 

357,283 
MilHchap, Mark Sthphen 
Mills, Beth Carol 387 
Mills, Debra Rae 
Mills, James Howard 
Mills, Robert Hugh 387 
Milne, Scott Stirling 387,390 
Mims, Valeris Kay 367 
Mims, William Cleveland 107, 

136,219,291,109,326,108,72 
Minehart, Peter James 326 
Minetree, Laraine Kay 210, 

211,326 
Minjack, Gregory Anson 326, 

283 
Minot m, Henry Whitney 
Minter, Steven Meredith 263 
Mitchell, Debra Lynn 357 
Mitchell. Ivy L. 
Mitchell, JoArme 
Mitchell, Lee Carpenter 
Mitchell, Martin Lane 
Mitchell, Michael A. 
Mitchell. Stephanie Ann 
Mitchell, Wayne Howard 220 
Mittleman, Meg 
Mittwede, Steven Keith 
Mixon, Arnold 
Moats, Dale Alexander 269 
Mocaraki, Kathy Anne 387 
Mock, Lisa Diane 387 
Modr, Frances Antoinette 326 
Moerson HI, Leo Carl 
Mogen, Thomas Charles 
Mohay, Kurt 
Mohr, Sandra Lee 132 
Moien, Judi R. 
Moll, Amy Elizabeth 326,108, 

277 
Moncure, Elizabeth Epes 124, 

196,387 
Monday, Thomas G. 249 
Mondshine, Elliot N, 220,221 
Monioudis, Maria Helena 195, 

326 



268 
Monroe, Mark Gerard 
Monster, Loch Ness 367 
Montague, Charlene Gayle 372 
Montgomery Randolph Dean 
Moomaw, Kathleen Jo 326 
Moon, James Brierly 
Mooney, Laura Jean 195,387 
Moore, Barbara Marie 326 
Moore, Betsy Joan 197,326 
Moore, Brian Thomas 230 
Moore, Christopher Bryan 
Moore. Dona Lee 131,326 
Moore, Douglas Walter 
Moore, Gergory Keith 
Moore, Hannah Walter 
Moore. Julie Kay 357,108 
Moore. Naomi C. 
Moore, Jr., Robert Patrick 

326 
Moore, Sherri Lynn 
Moore, Stephen Jerome 230 
Moorman II, Claude T. 398 
Moorman, Joseph C. 
Moran. Patricia Louise 
Mordhorst. Robert Anthony 

225,372 
Moreland, Edward Ernest 236, 

Morgan, David Gerald 222,326 
Morgan, Eileen Marie 326 
Morgan, Terrell Alan 327 
Morgans, Ann Katharine 196, 

372 
Morin, Lyrme Arm 
Morland, Evelyn Ward 
Moroney, Maryclaire 



Morris, Bruce Carl 
Mortis, Carol Ann 192,367 
Morris, Caroline Lee 
Morris, Cheryl Anne 204. 

206 327 
Morn's, Craig Kenneth 123,226, 

327 
Morris, Donald E. 274,415 
Morris m, Elmer Rudolph 398 
Morris, Jay Lynn 124,210,357 
Morris, Jermifer Caroline 
Morris, Michael Wayne 230,372 
Morris. Thomas Anthony 190. 

215,367 
Morrison, Ann Mary 398 
Morrison, Chen Lynn 250,272 
Morrison, Elizabeth HoUiday 

210 
Morrison, Kimberly Arme 208, 

387 
Morrison, Linda Lee 387 
Morrison, Mary Jane 
Morrison, Peter Alward 327 
Morrison, Sanford Neil 372. 

232,263 
Morrow, Robert Jeffrey 327. 

108 
Morse, Ann Dabney 206,387 
Morse, Carolyn Elizabeth 372, 

264,265 
Morse, Frederick Anderson 97, 

107,149,109,222,223, 

327,416 
Morton, James Bradley 163, 

327 
Moseley, Jr., Arthur Maddox 

235,306,327,109 
Moses, Sarah Helen 197 
Mosher, Nataline Lyrm 197. 

372 
Moter, Lawrence Russel 
Motley, Louise Norton 
Motley, Susan Callis 208 
Motsko, William Andrew, 328,273 
Mott, Elena Medora 328 
Mott, Kathleen Anne 
Mould, Owen Peter 
Mouring, Bradford Keith 328 
Movie, Mary Ellen 
Mowatt-Larssen, Elizabeth 268 
Mowday, Barry L. 
Mowry, E, Lynn 
Mozingo, Louise Anna 357 
Mozley, Susan Ruth 
Muccio, Daniel Joseph 226.273 
Mudd, Maria Meredith 387 
Muenchow, Richard William 

328,108 
Muganda, Godfrey C. 
Mullady, Mark Stephen 239, 

217 
Mullane, Deirdre Katherine 208, 

108 
Mulligan, Christopher Collar 78 
Mulligan, Patrick John 6,226 
Mullin, Nancy Ann 208,372 
Mullins, Larry Keith 
MuUins, Robert Brian 246 
Mulvany, Karen 327,328.108 
Mulvcy, Brian J. 225,273 
Mumley, Mary Theresa 
Mumm, Frederick Francis 398 
Mumpower, Lee F. 
Munford, Teresa Lynette 
Munroe, Thomas A. 
Munson, Steven Bergnian 127,372 
Mtmson, WiUiam Curtis 
Murano, Mary Catherine 372, 

276,277 
Murphree, Susan Jean 387 
Murphy, Dianne Ruth 328,123, 

210 
Murphy. Kevin M. 249 
Murphy, Lynn Kelley 192, 

Murphy, Michael Joseph 235,328 
Murphy, Sean Christopher 11, 

Murphy, William Joseph 328 
Murray, Brenda N. 
Murray, Charles Killin 
Murray, Georgina Lee 388 
Murray, James Lawrence 398 
Murtay, Kathy Lou 
Munay, Matthew Sweetman 

232,263 
Munay, Patti Leigh 192,367 
Munell, Denise Peete 198, 

199,328 
Murrell, Jr., Howard Julian 
Musarra, Thomas M. 
Muscalus, Robert Stewart 239, 



408/Index 



Myers, Darryl Kieth 
Myers. Lament D. 
Myers. Michael Evan 357 
Myers, Randolph Joseph 399 
Myles, Carol Jeanne 372 
Myrick, Timothy Glenn 328 
Myrom, Melinda J. 
Myzk, William Roger 



N 



Nabit, Charles John 
Nafzinger, Nancy Jo 357 
Nagai. Yoshinori 328 
Naiswald, Christian Rust 
Naletko, Valerie Ann 
Namkung, Juock Shin 
Nammack, Maria Frimann 328 

264 
Nance, Jov Ann Thorbjomsen 

328 
Nanzig, Thomas P. 
Naphy, William G. 124 
Nardolilli, Michael Anthony 
Naripthaphan, Voranuch 
Nary, Kevin Russell 131,388 
Nash, Lynn Ellen 260,357 
Nassoura, Steven Charles 
Nauer, Daniel Aram 
Nault, Peggy Ellen 
Navas, Luis Heliodoro 21 
Nay, Robert Frederick 
Neal, John Kennard 214,215, 

372 
Neal, Laura Fulton 
Neal. Jr., Paul Joseph 399 
Neblett, Thomas Spessard 164 
Neff, Nancy Elizabeth 261 
Neighbors, Michael Vince 372 
Niekirk, Stephanie Marie 
Neil, Linda Dorothy 275 
Neil, Peter Herbert 
NeiU, William Lee 124 
Nelliparambil, Prasannan 
NeUon, Albert 
Nelson, Carol Lee 
Nelson, John Conley 
Nelson, Lori Ann 328 
Nelson. Margaret Angela 

107.295.306,328,109 
Nelson. Scott Thomas 285 
Nematotahi, Habibolah Z. 
Nesse, Janet M. 
Nettles, Bryar Chappell 372 
Neumann. Douglas D. 
Newberry, Karen Haynes 192, 

357 
Newcomb. Deborah Ludwell 328 
Newcomb, Linda Sue 
Newell, Douglas John 
Newell, Jennifer Joyce 192, 



108 
Newell, Jr., Wilson Bennett 
Newhouse, Susan Carol 328 
Newing, Christine Mary 
Newman. Chen^l Lynn 192 
Newman, Jr.. Eugene Gray 357 
Newman, Janet S. 
Newman, Scott Alexander 274, 

372 
Newsom, Edith Diane 
Newton, James Eno 
Newton, Margaret Wren 
Newton, Jr., Robert Huelett 
Nguyen, Luan Huy 328 
Nguyen. Ngoc Diep Thi 
Nicchitta. Christopher Vincent 
Nicholas, Janice Carole 
Nichols, Barbara Lynn 357 
Nichols, Linda Lee 
Nichols, Rebecca Lynn 208, 

328 
Nichols, Stephen Andrew 328, 

108 
Nicholson, Laurinda Leigh 373 
Nicklev, Martin David 246 
Niebuhr, David Harold 388 
Nieburg, Dinah Hays 358 
Nielsen, Nancy Teresa 328.358 
Nieman. Loraine Kay 
Nierenberg, Andrew Paul 
Niska, Lucille Kathleen 358 
NizoD, Heather Loucks 195, 

373,264 
Noe, Richard Grier 



Noffsinger, Stephanie N. 

373 
Nolan, Diana Virginia 388,152 
NoHn, Daniel Elvin 
Noonan, Deborah S. 
Noonan, Susan C. 
Nordeen. Nancy Marie 373 
Nordlund, Lorraine 
Nordseth, Lori Beth 206,415 
Noreiko, Becky Marie 197.373 
Norenberg, Lvnn Ann 195. 

254.255.373.281 
Norlander, Todd Alan 25 
Norman. John J. 
Norman, Mildred Jean 
Norman, Teresa Elizabeth 264 
Norment, Marcia Lynnette 388 
Norton, Michael John 329 
Norton, William George 399 
Norwood, Kevin Duffy 
Nowicki, Nancy Jean 200,201, 

250,272 
Nowotny, Carl Frederic 
Noziglia, Jeanette Isabelle 
Nuckols. Betsv Aileen 388 
NuckoU, Mary Grace 195,388 
Nuckols, Michael Hunter 399 
Numan, Muhammad Z. 
Nunnally, Stuart Arnold 
Nuttall, Elizabeth Tucker 329 
Nyrop, Lise Aime 

o 



OakeB. Robert Randolph 
Oakley, Elizabeth Louise 210, 

211,329 
Oboyle, Kathleen Marie 
Oboyle, Patricia Suzanne 329 
O'Brien. Barbara Tarpey 
O'Connell, Anne Wright 200,373 
O'Connor, Annette Jane 329 
O'Connor, Jonathan Story 329 
Oder, Lanette Joy 373 
O'Doherty, Stephen Philip 219 
O'Doherty, Thomas John 127 
O'DonneU, Christine 
O'Donnell, Mary-Anne 
O'Donoghue, Patricia Jean 329 
O'Donohue, Daniel John 230 
Odor. Kevin C. 49.107,219. 

239.329.109 
O'Gorman. Edward Joseph 
O'Gorman. Susan Marie 255.388 
O'Grady. Kelly Jean 373 
Ogren. Kenneth M. 
O Hanlon. Annemarie Claire 388 
O'Hanlon. John Patrick 358 
O'Hara, Jane Alice 330 
O'Hara, Kathleen Frances 
O'Hara, May Lynn 
O'Hara, Nicholas Vincent 330 
O'Hara, Thomas Leo 
Ohtinger. Amy Lynn 373 
Okane. Kathleen Cecelia 126, 

373 
Okinaka. Naomi 192.358 
Olander. Donald Edward 
Old. Jr. William Abncr 
O'Leary. Raymond Michael 
Olenich, Tamara Jean 260.281 
Olewine. Timothy Daniel 220 
Oleynik. Jeffrey Edward 368. 

108.109 
Oliver. Barbara Dye 
OUver. David Scott 
OUver. Robert Warren 219.373 
O'Loughlin. Susan Marie 192,358 
Olsen, Kristin Just 195,330 
Olson, Grant Clifford 330 
Olson, Karl Tage 235 
O'Malley, Robert Brian 216, 

217,246 
O'Mara, Neal J. 133.285 
Ondarza. Roseanne 208.330 
O'Neal. Derek Andre 283 
O'Neal. Douglas Wayne 
O'Neill. David George 249 
O'Neill. Mary Margaret 197,373 
Opel, JuUa Ann 166 
Opperman, Antony Frank 
Orchesis 182 

Ordway, Aliette Marisol 358 
Orfe, Janis Ruth 
Organizations 112 
Orr, Jr., Harold Allen 
Orrico. Kristen 206.373 
Oisini, Barbara Erica 358 



Orton, Audrey Howes 
Osbom, Erin L. 
Osborne m. Henry Harrison 
Osborne. James Lee Edward 
O'SulIivan. Susan Marie 388 
Otto. Steve Cari 388 
Ottobre. Angela Mary 200.201 
Overbev, Terry Lvnn 358 
Overby. Kathleei; Adelia 204. 

205.358 
Overton. Gaye Lynn 200.373 
Overton. Lisa Jean 
Overton. William Jeffrey 388 
Oweis. Jamal Nathan 219 
Owen. Brenda L. 
Owen. Pamela Fay 
Owen. Roderic L. 103.109 



P 



Pace, Gary James 330 
Paclisanu, Anthony M. 
Pagano, James Robert 263 
Pagans. Rebecca Lynette 388 
Page, Alexis M. 
Page, David W. 
Page. Robert Wilson 
Page, Stevtm Douglas 
Paige, Edward Alcana 
Paine, John Wayne 34 
Paine. Peter Earl 
Painter, Jack Allan 388 
Paladeau, Jr., N. Louis 226 
Palanca, Terilyn 126,330 
Palmer, Forrest 283 
Palmer, Walter Butler 399 
Palmore, Paula Jean 275,388 
Palmore. Randolph Harris 
Pandak, Hilary Keith 219 
Pang. Wei-Shuan 388 
Pands, Helen 388,197 
Papamarcos, Steve D. 
Pappas, Jr.. Theodore John 
Paramore, Teresa Ann 388 
Pardee, Rosamond Louise 388 
Pare. Andrew Paul 
Paris, Laurie Lee 
Parker. Dennis Winston 330.35 
Parker, JeSrey Scott 
Parks. Kevin Leo 246 
Pamell. Isiah L. 
Parolini, William James 
Parrino, Robert 
Parrieh, James Randolph 232. 

249 
Parrish, Jr.. John Berryman 
Parrish, Judith Lynn 358 
Parrish, Nancy Louise 331 
Parsons. Catherine Marie 
Parsons, Twyla Lynn 135.195, 

331 
Paschal, Denise Lee 331 
Paschall, John Alan 219,331 
Pasteris, Lynn Marie 206,373 
Pastor, Jr., Lawrence James 
Pastore, Darlene Michelle 
Pastore, Lora Ann 388 
Pastore. Wendy Jean 
Pate, Beryl Yvonne McFadden 
Patesel. Jean Denise 
Patrick. Renae Reed 
Pattee, Diane Marie 331 
Patten, Elizabeth Ann 331.108 
Patterson, Ann Cummings 228 
Patterson. Bruce Ward 358 
Patterson, Jr., Donald Joseph 331. 



331 

Patterson. Mark Randall 
Patterson, Mary Beth 
Patterson, Patsy Annette 388 
Pattis. Janice A. Heatwole 
Patton, Christopher Alan 230. 

267 
Patton, Jeffrey Ross 114,331 
Patton, Polly Susan 
Patty, Robin Dale 208 
Paul, Mark Murfee 
Paulino. Anna Cristina Mortola 

388 
Paulson. David Eugene 127 
Paulson. Louis George 
Pawlowski. Edleen Frances 206, 

207.331 
Payne. Jr.. A. Clifton 
Payne, Jr., Charles Nelson 388 



Payne. Curtis Beale 
Payne. Dale Harrison 
Payne, Jr., Joe Stanley 
Payne, Leslie Kay 
Payne. Lisa Grace 331.108 
Payne. Mark David 331 
Pavne. Timothy Jon 
Pavnter. Kathleen Elizabeth 
Paynter, Kennedy Troy 235 
Pazoga, Patricia Jean 208, 
358 



Pearce, Anita Gail 200 
Pearce. James Clinton 
Pearcy, Marsha Glyn 
Pearlstein, Brent Lewis 
Pearson, Ellyn Bain 192,388 
Pearson. Herta Ann 
Pearson. Katherine Lee 358 
Pearson, Kathleen Marie 
Pedersen. Robert John 331 
Pedersen, Bruce J. 399 
Pedlar. Charles Josiah 283 
Pebbles IV. Thomas Henry 388,263 

263 
Peeler, Elizabeth Lovem 
Peelman, James Michael 
Peery, Jr., Donald Porter 230 
Peery. Laurie Anne 
Pegram. Jill Nannette 210 
PeitBO. Ten Jill 
Pellegrini. William John 
Pena HI. Jose Marie 
Pendley, Kerry Ann 
Pene, Ralph Charles 
Penman, Gordon R. 
Pennewell, Anne Stewart 124, 



Pennix, James Ervin 358 
Penola, Robert Scott 
Pensak, B. Steven 
PEOPLE 292-293 
Pepper, Elisabeth Ann 203,248, 

373 
Pepper. Susan Kathleen 
Peralta, Cheryl Marie 331 
Perez, Joseph John 
Perfall, Artliur Clayton 226 
PERFORMING ARTS 158 
Perkins. Deborah Karen 
Perkins, Lucinda 
Perkinson, Sharon Lynn 
Perlman, Linda Susan 
Perlowski, Kevin John 
Peroe, Cvnthia Evelvn 206,373 
Perrime, William Chadwick 190. 

232,331 
Perrot. Virginia 373 
Perry, Doris Michelle 399 
Perry, Jr., John Edward 
Peruffo, Diane Marie 331,108 
Petchul. Carol Ann 196.197,331 
Petersen. Erica Ray 358 
Peterson. Blake Arthur 388 
Peterson, Cheryl Ann 331 
Peterson, Sandra L. 
Peterson. Thomas Dennis 
Petrolia, Jeannette Beatrice 
Peucker, Janet Carol 210 
Peworchik, James Anthonv 388 
Peyton, Sarah Dabney 126 
Pfanz. Donald Crittenden 358 
Pfeffer. Peter John 239 
Pfeifer, Cynthia Marie 
Pfeifer, Patricia Lee 
Pflueger, Amy Louise 203 
Pham, Hua Trung 
Phelps. Billie T. 
PHI KAPPA TAU 220-221 
Philipp, Barbara Ann 373 
Philipp, Walter 358 
Phillips, Bruce Beaumont 
Phillips. Charles Weston 253. 

Phillips. Cheryl L. 
Phillips. Christopher 
Phillips. David Duncan 230 
Phillips, Denise Audrey 331 
Phillips, Dori Ann 208,331,415 
Phillips m, Howard Lee 388 
Phillips, Maribeth Dalson 152 
Phillips n, Roy Franklin 217 

Phillips. Susan Elizabeth 

Penny 373 
PhilHps, Susan Ann , 
Philloa, Akrivoula 
PHI MU 220-221 
PHI MU ALPHA 127 
PI BETA PHI 210-211 
Pickard, Richard Randolph 399 
Pickell, Stuart Charles 388 



Pickering, Kathleen Ann 
Pickett, Susan Merriman 135. 

206,288.373 
Pickrell, Janice Irene 124, — - 

208.373 
Picou, Robbi Ann 
Piedmont, Susan Carty 
Pierce, Edna Lynn 
Pierce, James Edward 
Pierce 11. James Harold 331 
Pierce, Jr., Richard Brayton 35 
Pierce. Terrv Lvnn 
PI KAPPA ALPHA 222-223 
PI LAMBDA PHI 224-225 
Pilgrim. William Brian 278 
Pillai. Seetha K. 331 
Pillow, Reuben Chris 
Pilson, Karen Elaine 
Pinch, Kathleen Charlotte 208 
Pine, Kiraberlv Jo 210.373 
Pinkham, Audrey Lynn 208. 

332 
Pinto. Colleen Marie 332 
Pirog. Susan E. 
Pirri, John Stuart 
Pirri. Vincent Gregory 
Pittman. Jr., Charles Dandridge 
Pittman. Marquerite Alexander 
Pitzer, Elizabeth Neal 
Plaag. Gary Kenneth 127,332 
Piatt. Christina Marie 332 
Ptavnick, Judith Ann 151.203, 

248,109 
PLAY UO-IU 
Pleasants, JetTrey Roland 
Pleasants, Stuart Alan 
Plumley HI, Allan Rudolph 388 
Plumly. Rebecca Anne 332 
Plummer. David Bryan 
Plunkett, James Jerill 332.415 
Pobiner. Bonnie Fay 208.358 
Podger. Nancy Ellen 203,272 
Pohl. Christoph 

Poland, Kimberly Joan 210.358 
Polglase. Christopher Reece 228, 

229 
Polhill in. Lucius McLendon 
Policastro. Michael Francis 
Pollack, Ronald A. 415 
Pollard. Carolyn Jane 
Pollard. Patricia Ann 199 
Pommerening, William Edwin 

226,358 
Pond, Peyton Gibson 
Ponticello, Stacv Anne 359 
Pool, Jr., Edward Fuller 332.232, 

334 
Poole. Mary W. 
Pope. James Harwood 
Pope. Rena Blanche 197.332 
Pope, Robert H. 373 
Poplawski. Michael David 
Popman. Elaine Marie 332 
Popp, Deanee Smith 
Porasky. Joseph Michael 
Portasik, Laura .Marie 281 
Porter, Janet Lyrui 388 
Porter, Leslie /^uine 
Porter. Susan Carol 359 
Porter. William David 
Posenack. Jean Helen 
Poston. Jonathan H. 
Potkalitsky, Jill Elizabeth 
Potorti, Stephen Joseph 359 
Potter. Holly Ann 317.332,108 
Pottle. Kathleen Sue 
Potts. Carlton Sherry 
Potts. James Woodward 332 
Potts. Michael Lee 
Poulson. Elisa Joy 332 
Powell, Andrew John 
Powell. Angela Fehce 
Powell. Harlan Charles 
Powell. James Wegener 388 
Powell, Jean Susan 373 
Powell, Stephen Tauer 
Powell, William Lee 
Pratt. Judith Mary 
Preli, Mark Allan 
Press. Marlene Renee 
Price, Catherine Ann 
Price n. Charles Edward 388 
Price, Jeffrey Llewellyn 125 
Price. Linda Robin Stemfield 
Prillaman, Sarah Suzanne 197, 

373 
Prince. Anita Elaine 
Prince. Sarah Carroll 373 
Prince, Susan Mae 200,201 
Prince. Warren Thomas 388.162 
Prior, James Edwards 
Prior. John Charles 
Pritchard, Pamela Lynn 373 
Pritchard. Patricia Lettie 196, 

197,242,332 
Pritt. Peari C. 
Prock. Susan 204.359 
Proffltt, Candia Yvonne 



Index/409 



Proffitt, Sandra Kim 

Propert, Christopher Barnes 332 

ProBcino, Cheryl Lynn 250,332, 

108,272 
Provencher, Kenneth P. 
Prym, Jeffrey Allen 
Pnybvcien, Robert William 
Przypyszny, Karen Ann 206.359, 

108 
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB 129 
Pugh Ernest Olin 222,332 
Pugh Manlyn G. 
fugh Spencer Alan 373 

ifley Jr Collin Graham 
. jlley Franklin Dean 
Pulley Rebecca Harper 
Pulley Stephen McDonald 
Puis Stacy Kimbark 197,373, 

281 
Punjabi Alkesh Ramprakesh 
Purcell Christopher Kelly 

f Purcell Karen Burdick 

^ Purdy Jewel 373,197 

IjPurdy Ted Joseph 332 

fpurser Margaret Sermons 
PurtiU Kathleen 373 

sPuryear Bruce Conrad 

gPuster David Walden 332,263 

|Pyne Alan Richard 
^ Janet Webb 



ft 



Quaintance, Susan Virginia 
Quann, Charles Danial 235 
Quattlebaum, Mary Alice 369 
QUEEN S GUARD 122 
Quick, Aurelia Parramore 208, 

Quigg Karen Elizabeth 196.333 
Quigley Elien Louise 192,389 
Quigley Katherine Lynn 389, 

197 
Qumdlen Kathleen Judith 389 
Qume Stisan Carol 389 
Qumn Heather Ann 389 
Qumn Jeffrey Andrew 
Qumn Peter John 
Quirk Anne Ehzabetb 
Quitko Kay Klose 
Quynn m Russell Hoover 222, 



R 



Rachelson, Howard S. 
Rackley, Barbara Shearin 
Raczenbek, Cynthia Margaret 

194,195.333 
Raczkowski, Gary George 222, 

333 
Raden, Lee Richard 
Rader, Jay Roland 127 
Rae, Robert Bruce 399 
Ragan, Jerry Neil 
Raghunathan, Vanamali 
Ragsdale, Duane Harris 
Ragsdale, Judith Ray 
Ragsdale, Katherine Hancock 
Raitch, Stephanie Lynn 373 
Ralston, John Joseph 
Rambow, Herbert F. 
Rambow, Teresa Louise 
Rsmsden, James P. 
Ramsey. Harriet Nawasa 333 
Ramsey. Jerry A. 
Ramsey, Kelvin Wheeler 333,398 
Ramsey, Rickey Dale 215 
Randle, John Brooks 
Raney, David Alan 415 
Raney. John P. 
Ranson, Anne Elizabeth 
Rapaport. Robert Alan 399 



Rappe, Susan Laurie 359,191, 

206 
Rarick, Jay Allen 
Rarig. Natalie Schell 359 
Rasche, Katherine E. 
Raschi, Anna L. 
Rash. Robert Mitchell 239.217 
RasmuBsen, Carolyn Leanee 210 
Ratchford, Diane Marie 389,206 
Rathjen, Kira Sue 373,264 
RatkuB, Jim 249 
Ratzlaff, Leshe Allison 389 
Rau, Kenneth Vaughn 
Raung, Coralie Kiolet 
Rausch, Robert S. 
Rawding, Arthur Clark 389,127, 

253,283 
RawlingB, Michael Wayne 389 
Ray, Jr., Herbert Howard 
Ray, Robert F. 
Raymond, Patricia L^Tin 389 
Read, Nancy Oliver 272 
Read, Robert M. 
Reagan, James Corbett 359.223, 

222 
Reagan. Paul J. 263 
Reams, Jr., James Richard 373 
Reardon, Ann Marie 373,197 
Reardon, Kathleen Sheila 333,204 
Redding, John Carl 
Reddv, Jr., Thomas Francis 222 
Redmond, John Russell 373.215 
Redmond, Maureen Patricia 264 
Redpath, Alan John 



272 
Reed, Donna Lynn 373 
Reed, Lane Richardson 
Reed, Lauren Lineii 
Reed, Mark Norman 359,215 
Reed. Sheila Kay 37 
Reed. Susan Anita 333 
Reeder. Raymon Gene 
Reeks, Karen Ann 389 
Reeks. Milisea June 374,135 
Reese, Karen M. 
Reese, Sandra F. 
Reeves, Brenda Lee Hoffman 359, 

Reeves, Jr., Harold Windal 389 

Reeves, Trudy 359,206 

Rehme, Jane E. 

Reid. Cynthia Lee 374,192,210 

Reidiand, Peggy Reynolda 

Reil, Mark Joseph 

Reilly. Paul David 333,108 

Reilly, William David 399 

Reitz, Diana Kevit 

Reitz. Jr.. John H. 

REUGI0N44 

Renger, Bernard Simon 374.225 

Renner, Mary Anne 230 

Renz. David Wayne 333,215 

Replogle, Bruce Robert 

Reach, Carol Ann 

Restuccia, Amy Ruth 359,191, 

204 
Reter, Janine Louise 333.211. 

210 
Revell, Cheryl Ann 
Revere, James Franklin 
Rexrode, Brenda Sue 389 
Reyn, Paula Ann 
Reynolds, Frances Herring 
Rhee, Russell 

Rhein, John David 389.267 
Rhinehart, Lee 374 
Rhoads. Mark Buchanan 222 
Rhodes, Diana Lyim 359 
Rhodes, Laura Kelsey 203 
Rhodes, Pamela Lee 389,197 
Rhodes, Stephen F. 
Rhodes, Todd McAllister 215, 

333 



277 
Ricca, David Alan 359 
Rice, Benidia Andrea 
Rice, Davis Arthur 
Rich, Jennifer Lee 
Rich, Judith Ann 
Rich, Sandra Lee 
Richard, Amy E. 
Richard, Kent Brian 
Richards, Peter Muhlenberg 
Richards, Robert Dirom 
Richards, Robert Scott 
Richards. Yevette 389 
Richardson, Kimberly Rae 
Richardson, Linda Emma 359 
Richardson, Mark Benton 
Richardson, Rhonda Anne 333 
Richman, Patrice Fay 
Richmond, Helen Leas 
Richter, Lee James 374 
Richter, Todd Benjamin 333,285 



Rickerich, Ann Amanda 205.359 
Ricketts, Jennifer Dawn 389 
Ridd, Susan Elizabeth 
Riddle, John Mark 389 
Riddle, Raymond Scott 
Riddle, Rebecca Lee 206,359 
Ridenhour, Susan Faye 389 
Riley, Barbara Monroe 
Riley. Gavle Kathleen 
Riley, James Robert 235, 

374 
Riley, John Patrick 135 
Riley, Linda Kay 208,243 
Ringel, Mark Robert 334 
Risinger, Mark Wayne 
Ritson, Jonathan Lee 235, 

334 283 
Rittner, Hanno Ingbert 274,374 
Ritts, Leslie Sue 
Ktz, Paul John 
Rivaa, Bernard T. 
Riveil, Elizabeth Ann 197, 

334 
Rives, Linda Jean 359 
Rivea, William Francis 
Rizzo, David Paul 334 
Roach, Brett Reagan 359 
Roadcap, Steven Paul 399 
Robb. Amy Elizabeth 
Robbins, David Lea 
Robbins, Helen Norene 
Roberson, Sandra Donnarie 

206,359 
Robert. Frank Chambers 5 
Roberts, David Michael 389 
Roberta, Elizabeth Mae 389 
Roberts, Paul T, 151 
Roberts, Jr.. Thomas Walker 
Robertson, Betty Shotton 
Robertson, Deborah Ann 208, 

374 
Robertson, Virginia Bowen 

389 
Robins, Christopher James 

Robins m, Hubel 226. 

374 
Robins, Karen B. 
Robinson, Ann Henley 
Robinson. Cynthia Leigh 389 
Robinson, Deborah Jean 
Robinson, Janeen Ann 374 
Robinson, Lisa Marie 389 
Robinson, Paul Craig 334 
Robinson, Reta Mae 359 
Robinson, Susan 
Robinson, William Q. 399 
Robison, Mary Mae 374 
Roche, Kevin Joseph 
Rock, Frank Daniel 
Roderick, Mary C. 
Rodgers, Catherine Ann 
Rodgers, Helen Elizabeth 192, 

359 
Rodgers, John Franklin 399 
Rodgers, William Gerard 222 
Rodriguez, Michael Andrew 

334 
Roe, Carol R. 
Rogan, Michael John 127 
Rogar, Larry Edwin 
Rogers, Charles Lewis 
R<^erfi. David John 389 
Rogers. Sandra Kay 196.197, 

334 
Rogers, Sarah Burke 
Rogers, Stuart Perinchief 

253,374 
Roland, David Franklin 
Rolen, Cynthia Gwen 374 
Rolen, Stanley Michael 
Rollins, Martha Gallagher 

Roltsch, Helen Jan 237,374 

268,269 
Roman, Robert Francis 359 
Romanczyk, Jane Ann 374,281 
Romano, Steven James 225 
Romeo, Christopher Francis 

389 
Romeo, Maria Catherine 
Roof, Ronald Joseph 
Rooney, Rebecca Anne 
Rosa, George J. 
Rose, Anne Preston 
Rose, Thomas Paul 
Roseili, Theresa Marie 
Rosemond, Roxie Oliver 
Rosenbaum, Charles Ivan 
Rosenberg, Christine Leiand 
Rosenthal, Joseph Michale 
Ross, Amy Jane 389 
Ross, Carolyn Hunter 359 
Rots, Jeffrey L. 
Ross, Rebecca Shell 
Rossi, Roberta Marie 334 
Rossiter, Kevin Allan 144, 

336,109 



Roth, James David 
Rothacker. Jr., Robert Donald 

215,335,108 
Rothberg, Elizabeth Celia 

208.335 
Rother, Patricia Jean 
Rothschild, Richard Alan 252, 

253,283 
Rough, Carol Ann 
Roush, Mark David 
Roussos, Robert Vincent 
Row, Michael Chesley 
Rowe, Sylvia Heide 374 
Rowland, Alice Louise 126, 

374 
Roy, Anita Lee 359 
Roy, Dhanobroto 
Royster. Deborah Lucheryl 
Royston, Chris Michael 225, 

273 
Rozantz, Thomas Edward 228, 

238.239 
Rozzelle, Jan J. 
Ruben, John Carroll 273 
Rubenking, Brian Harold 
Rudolph, Mark Edward 389 
Ruesch, David Augustine 
Ruff, Stephen Howard 48, 



Ruiz, Antonio Jose 131 
Rumberger, Kathy Elizabeth 
Rupert, David Alan 389 
Rupp. Jeff Douglas 226, 

306.335.108 
Ruppersberger, Jr.. William 

Leslie 217.273 
Rusevlyan, Jr., Andrew Robert 

219,359 
Rush, Deborah Lynne 335 
Russell, Bridgett Patrice 

359 
Russell, Jeffrey Alan 
Russell, Lisa Carol 208 
Russell, Lynn Taylor 206,277 
Russell, Mark Duane 359 
Russo, Jeffrey Francis 
Rust, Dana Lewis 
Rutherford, Joseph Robert 
Ryan, Elizabeth Maiy 390 
Ryan, Jr., James Joseph 228, 

239,109 
Ryan HI, Joseph Michael F. 

335.222,109 
Ryan, Philip Keebler 
Ryan, Susan Ann 335 
Ryan, William Thomas 232 
Ryder, Mary Evelyn 
Ryer, Clifford Henry 



S 



Saari. Patrice Anne 208 
Saccone, Michael Joseph 359 
Saccone, Stephanie Ann 335 
Sacks. David Matthew 359 
Sadler, Jack Richardson 
Sadler, James Howard 
Sadler, John Timothy 
Sager, Susan Blanche 
Sagolla, Lisa Josephine 183, 

359 
Sais, Josephine Isabel 369 
Sakata, Jon Matsuo 130,131 
Salbu, Steven R. 
Sale, Era Suzaime 374 
Salhany, Donna Jean 
Salmon, Douglas Reid 225,335 
Salmon, Jr., Richard Henry 
Salter, Steven Albert 232 
Samford, Patricia Merle 335 
Samms. Kathy Hamilton 
Samms, Richard W. 
Sampson, Bonnie R. 
Sampson, Gregory 283 
Sampson, Timothy Beastey 

Samuels, Cynthia Allen 360 

414,415,109 
Samuels, Margaret Ann 
Sancetta, Biagio A. 
Sanchez-Moreno, Ana Maria 

Smith 374 
Sanchez, Laura Luisa 
Sanchez, Maria 
Sanderford, Mary Arm 390 



Sanderlin, Marilyn Jean 374 
Sanders, Jr., Clayton Robert 
Sanders, David George 374 
Sanders, Lisa 
Sanders, Robin Sue 
Sanderson, Laura Jane 131.374 
Sanford, Kathryn Fretw^^^, 
Sanford, Mary BeveTls^tff?^B60 
Sanger, Pamela Sue 
Santoro, Frank James 399 
Santos, Ralph G. 
Sardo, Catherine Anne 27,280, 

281 
Sardo, Laura Lynn 360,280 
Sargent, Edward James 
Sarin, Deepak 261 
Sartor, Mark Alan 246,390 
Satkowaki, Susan Ellyn 
Satterfield, Brenda Ann 390 
Saueracker, Julia Ann 126,192 
Saunders, Anne Washington 
Saunders, Bill Daniel 
Saunders. Devra Luann 
Saunders, Margaret Susan 360 
Saunders, Pauline Vera 374 
Saunders, Richard Peter 
Saunders, Robert Lynn 
Saunders, Sara Harold 390 
Saunders. Shirley S. 
Saunders. Jr., Spencer William 
Saunders HI. William Ed- 
ward 335 
Saunders, William Paul 335 
Sautter, Julie Ann 360 
Savage, Jr., John Thomas 335, 

109 
Savage, Jr., Malcolm Brooks 

335.415 
Savage, Martha Louise 
Savage, Robert Allen 
Savage, Ronald 
Savage, William Mapp 390 
Sawyer, Larry Bernard 
Sawyer. Randolph Howell 230 
Sawyer, Sheryl Ann 
Saxton, Bradley 
Scaife. Allen Ross 
Scalera, Catherine Maiy 
Scalise, Eric T. 
Scanlan. Lisa Anne 335 
Scanlan, Sheila Maree 335 
Scanlon, Michael Bernard 
Scarlett. Diana Marie 390 
Scarlett, Kane Allen 
Scarr, Thomas Edward 
Schaab, Brooke Browne 
Schafenacker, Ann Marie 
Schafer, Jerre Lyn Catherine 
Schaffer, David Richard 246, 

360 
Schafftier, Linda C, 
Schafrann, Richard Anders 399 
Schalk. Mark Howard 273 
Schapiro, Mona Beth 
Schek. Joyce Lynn 335 
Schellenberg, Robert Karl 390 
Schellenbere, Roger Thomas 
Schenarts, Susan Mock 390 
Scherer. Kathie Ellen 374,280, 



336 
Schiller, Mareke Meiborg 
Schilling, John Michael 
Schirmer, Martha 192,48,335 
Schlagenhauf, Jeffrey Lloyd 
Schlick, Joseph Jordan 230 
Schmelz, Claire Marie 374 
Schmid, Patricia Louise 
Schmidt, David Howard 360 
Schmidt, Vivian Joyce 204, 

374,268 
Schmittlein, Michael Albert 

219,108 
Schneider, Timothy John 390, 

283 
Schnell, Alan Leslie 
Schnell, Sharon Louise 390 
Schocklin, Donna Estelle 390 
Schoen, Paula Love 374 
Schoen, Richard Frederic 230 
Schoepke, Susanne Alexandra 
Schofield, John Stoner 
Scholand, Stefanie Elizabeth 

374 
Scholte, Suzanne Kristine 

208 
Scholz. Charisse Melanie 374 
Schomo, Bert 151 
Schomo, Mao 131 
Schoner, Amy Elizabeth 275, 



410/Index 



Schreiber, Thomas Edward 230, 

267 
Schriefer, Janet Marie 360 
Schroder. Peter Joseph 
Schuette, Elizabeth Anne 

360,108,281 
Schuler, Philip James 
Schulte, Bruce Alexander 
Schultz, Frederick William 267 
Schultz, Mary Florence 

335 
Schumacher, Deborah Lynn 
Schupp, Richard Frank 
Schuster, Pamela Lee 
Schwab, John Conrad 
Schwaner, Jr., Jack Anthony 
Schwartz, Carole Lena 390 
Schwartz, Charles Anthony 
Schwartz, Laura Suzanne 360, 

264 
Schwarz, James P. 335 
Schwarz. Laura 390 
Scbwanman. Steven Ala? 
Schwenke. Barbara Ann 

204.390 
SchwuUt. Carolyn Gaylord 

200 
Scibelli, Jr., Arthur Peter 
Scofield, Donald Gow 390 
Sconvers, Janis Michelle 

151 
Scott, Amy Elizabeth 
Scott, Charles Granville 

336,169 
Scott, David Bennett 
Scott. Elizabeth Calvin 210. 

360 
Scott. Joseph Brian 131 
Scott. Kathaleen Lynn 390 
Scott, Laine Allison 360 
Scott, Lisbeth Ellen 
Scott, Maiy Louise 194,195 
Scott, Nancy Elaine 255.281 
Scott, Steven Arthur 
Scott, Susan Elizabeth 220, 

336 
Scott, Tammy Ellen 360 
Scott, William Edward 

219,239,241,360 
Scott, William John 
Scruggs, Catherine Louise 
Scudder, Harold Stephen 
Scura, Mark M. 235,415 
Scussel. Janice Lynn 208.374 
Seaborn, Dorie Marie 360 
Seaman, Alan Armstrong 374 
Seaman, Henry W. 
SearU, Laurie Fern 
Sebacher, Kim Susan 336 
Secor. Julie Rae 360 
Secrist, Luida Karen 374 
Sedwick, Martha Anne 360 
Seele, Stephen Edward 48, 

374,109 
Segall, Alison Leigh 
Seggerman, Virginia Louise 

192,374 
Seidel. Cynthia Anne 360 
Seidel, H. Edward 
Seidel, Sandra Serena 374 
Seim, Marc Josiah 
Seitz, J. Barton 235,374 
Self, Judith Harrison 
Selfe, Nancy J. 
Sellers, Charles Howard 390 
Sellers, Suzanne Moore 210 
Sellers, Virginia Anne 374 
Sellera, Virginia Hana 
Selz, Laurie 
Semisch, Mark Randall 
Sempelea* John Demo 
Senaelbaeh, Karen Lavina 

192,336 
Senior, Susan Jeanne 
Sentman, Catherine Sue 126, 

336,77,170 
Serena, Thomas E. 374,270, 

271 
Seesoms, Kari Lauralyn 

Settle, Teresa Mae 
Settlemyer, Rebecca Fern 336 
Setzer, Kathy Lee 192, 

336,103 
Sevier, Vernon A. 
Seward, Troilen Gainey 
Seymour, Marcia Elaine 208 
Shaara, Ula 360 
Shaffer, GuIb Rose .. 
Sha^r, ,n9nny Hete^ 
Shafher, Bonnie Kay 
ShafirBn, James Stephen 336 
Shalek. Marc Scott 
Shanahan, Peter Harry 274 
Shannon, Carol Annette 360 
Shannon, Lyime Johnson 390 
Shannon, Paul John 



Shannon, Jr.. Thomas Alfred 

415,109 
Sharer. Frances G. 
Sherman, Charles Christian 

360,109 
Sharp, Barry Joseph 230,375 
Sharp, Charlotte Gray 210,181, 

336 
Sharp, Nancy Hunter 210, 

Shaughnessy, Chris Horrell 
Shaw, Andrea Marie 390.152 
Shaw, Jr.. Edwin Ferebee 
Shaw. Elisa Marie 390 
Shaw. Peter Mark 
Shaw. William T. 
Shawver. Jere Garrett 391 
Shea. Eileen Lavoime 
Shea. Kelly Ann 208,391 
Shea, Michael Angelo 166,391 
Shea, Peter John 
Sheehy, Brian Daley :' 

Shell, Judith Ellen - "^ 

Shell, Mary Elizabeth 
Shelby. Lvnne Ann 336 
Shelton. Charles Jeffrey 
Shelton, Nancy Beatrice 107, 

135,206,336,109 
Shelton, Victoria Lynne 
Shem. Lauren Marie 
Shepherd. Kenneth Sam 
Sheppard m, Clinton Holland 
Sheppard, Joanne Leigh 376, 

28S 
Sheppard, Sharleen H. 
Sheridan. Rebecca Lee 336 
Sherland, Susan Elizabeth 360 
Sherman, Richard Morey 118 
Shewmake, William Henry 222. 

391 
Shibut. Macon Alexandre 
Shields, James Vincent 253, 

360,371,385,283 
Shields, .Jeff C. 
Shields. Mary Ellen 203. 

336 
Shields, Jr.. Norman Guy 
Shiffer, Rebecca Anne 336 
Shih, Shih-Pong 
Shih, Shih-Shing 192, 

Shilan, Stephen Burridge 336 
Shilstone, William Arthur 
Shine, Frances Elizabeth 337 
Shine, Glenn Robert 391 
Shine, Margaret Marie 360 
Shinn, Susan Valerie 391 
Shishkevish, Helen 23,206, 

207 
Shoaf, Susan Elizabeth 250, 

376,272 
Shocket, Suanne 
Shoemaker, Kurt Lee 
Shoemaker. Patricia Anne 

391,277 
Shomaker HI, John Fleming 

Shore, Marshall F. 
Short, Jr., John James 
Short, Jr., Robert James 217, 



Shukaitis, Mark J. 
Shuler, Clark Brooks 235 
ShuU, Robert Owen 391 
ShuU, Steven Mark 228, 

239 
Shulman, Howard 
Shumaker, Susan Carol 
Sibilla, Guy Alan 399 
Sibley, Laura Diane 375 
Siddall. Yvonne R. 
Sidebottom. Lmda Hudgens 
Sides. Debra Lynn 208, 

Siebentritt m, Carl Robert 
Siebentritt, Gretta Kathiyn 

107,274,337 
Siegfried, Elizabeth Mercie 

391 
Siemens, Sandra Gay 
Siemonsen, Joy Lynn 
SIGMA CHI 226-227 
SIGMA NU 228-229 
SIGMA PHI EPSILON 230- 



Silkworth, William Ryon 337, 

414,415,109 
Silverman, Bruce Alton 337 
Silverman, JeSrey Scott 



Sim, Anna Cain 

Sim, Martha Elizabeth 206, 

348,360 
Simmering, Candace Eileen 

197 
Simmons, Erik Paul 
Simmons, Karen Laurie 

183,337 
Simmons, Kathryn Ann 337 
Simmons, Lee Ann 
Simmons, Narmette Marie 360 
Simmons, Jr., Thomas Newton 

217 
Simms, Kathryn Jeanette 391 
Simon, Curtis Joseph 
Simone, Michael Peter 
Simone, Susan Elizabeth 
Simonson. John Crosland Blake 

232 
Simpson, Gloria Doreen 192, 

375 
Simpson, Patricia Louise 337 
Simpson, Stephen Lee 360 
Sims, Lena J. 375 
Singh. Sheila Rani 
Sinnott. Jr., Otis Allston 
Sites, Joseph Lee 
Sitterson, Katherine Louise 

148.375.109,415 
Sivavec. Timothy Mark 
Sizemore. Lawrence C. 
Skapars. Lmda Anne 206, 

Skelly, Kimberly Kay 124, 

203,375 
Skerl, Barbara Ann 
Skiba, Thomas Mark 376 
Skillin, Rosemary 
Skinger. Karen Virginia 
Skipper. Everett Paul 391 
Skoglund. Cynthia Mae 375 
Skoglund, Virginia Marvin 337 
Skovran, Nadine 337 
Skovran, Nina 337 
Slagle, Gary Summerell 
Slater, Douglas Kenneth 267 
Slater, Susan Lee 210,360 
Slaughter, Douglas Anthony 

337 



Sledge, Judy Frances 
Slczak, Karen 197,391 
Sloan, Barbara Ann 
Slocumb, Travis Hugh 
Slomineki, Christopher John 

360,282,283 
Slonaker, Elizabeth Leigh 192 
Small, Marc James 
Smalley, Edward Scott 399 
Smart, Lisa Ann 
Smedley, Jane Elizabeth 376 
Smelley, Craig Allen 
Smethurst, Doiiglas Carter 
Smiley, Paul Richard 
Smith, Andrew D. 
Smith, Ann Elizabeth 376,415 
Smith, Annamarie Shannon 391 
Smith, Beverly Gibbs 337 
Smith, Bruce Chippendale 
Smith, Carol Rene 
Smith, Charles F. 
Smith. Charles Gerard 
Smith, Charies H. 
Smith, Charles William 
Smith, Christine Leigh 210 
Smith. Christopher Scott 
Smith. Craig Colin 391 
Smith, Craig Howard 399 
Smith, Craig John 399 
Smith, Cynthia Elaine 337 
Smith. Dana Norman 
Smith. David Brandon 
Smith. David Harper 222.237 
Smith. David Praeger 278 
Smith. Dean W. 
Smith, Debbie Jean 
Smith, Deborah Hudson 192, 

193,275.337 
Smith, Deborah Wood 
Smith, Debra Anne 
Smith, Diane 
Smith, Douglas Frank 220 
Smith, Edmund Reed 20,337,415 
Smith, Elizabeth Louise 

195,311,391 
Smith, Glen Welsh 242 
Smith, Gretchen Elizabeth 

200,109 
Smith, Helen Elizabeth 
Smith, Jr., Howard Talmon 

337 
Smith, Janice Carol 391 
Smith, Jenifer Mareton 375 
Smith, Joseph W. 
Smith, Katherine Tucker 
Smith, Kathryn Lee 206,360 



Smith, Kimberly Arm 
Smith, Kimberly Anne 206,337 
Smith, Marilyn Payne 
Smith, Mark Richard 
Smith, Mark Stephen 
Smith, Mark Stephen 
Smith, Mary Margaret 
Smith, Mary Tomaseski 
Smith, Peggy Hood 
Smith, Rav Gregory 
Smith, Rebecca Anne 
Smith, Rebecca Beach 399 
Smith, Rebecca Elizabeth 3.38 
Smith, Richard Alan 222,338 
Smith, Richard Eugene 
Smith m. Richard Holladay 
Smith. Richard Murray 
Smith. Richard Randolph 
Smith. Ronald James 249 
Smith. Sharon H. 
Smith. Sheiyl Lee 360,108 
Smith, Stephen Meade 
Smith, Steven Easley 166, 

190,222,360 
Smith, Susan Elaine 375 
Smith, Teresa Lee .360.108 
Smith, Jr., Thomas Arthur 
Smithson, Rebecca L. 
Smoot. Ronald Harvey 
Snarr, Susan Elizabeth 338 
Snediker. Susan Jayne 109 
Snellings. Karla Lynn 391 
Snellinge. Kimberly Sue 360 
Snider. Deborah Ann 360 
Snidow. Pamela Sue 200.360 
Snow, Daniel Gerard 131 
Snyder. Averel B. 228.249 
Snyder. Brett Richard 360,109 
Snyder, Elizabeth Ada 399 
Snyder, KcUi Patricia 391 
Soaper, Jr., Richard H. 
Soban, Thomas Edward 253,283 
Soberick. Michael Thomas 399 
Sobus, Paul Richard 
SOCIETY FOR COLLE- 
GIATE JOURNA- 
USTS 113 
Soden, Brandon M. 
Sokkappa, Padmini Rachel 131, 

Sokol, Leslie Elayne 200,128 
Soles. Linda Lou 
Soils. Michael Taylor 338 
Solitario. John Paul 249 
Solomon. Carrie Lee 210.391 
Solomon. Marilyn Stoner 
Soloway. Robert Alan 
Soltis. Lynn Allison 
Somers, Pamela Jean 
Sormenberg, Kyle Russell 

338,109 
Sooner, Brenda Sue 
Soroka, Stephanie EUen 
South, Carolyn Sibley 
Southard. Robin Lynn 338 
Southern. Maiy Jo 
Souza. Raymond Manuel 338 
Sowell, Mary Lea .360,415 
Spacek^aul Kevin 
Spady in, Frank Alma 
Spaniel, William George 274 
Sparrow, Charles Kavanaugh 

214,215 
Speere, Julie Katherine 
Spencer, Debra -Joan 284 
Spencer. Hardwick Ray 163,164 
Spencer, .Jr., Sidney Gordon 
Spencer. Stace>- Leigh 
Spencer. Susan Lyim 391 
Spicer. Henry Konrad 
Spicer. Pamela Sue 210.211, 

338 
Spicknall, Robert Hale 
Spiller, Manrery Scott 338 
Spinuzza, Thomas John 
Spiri, Mary Helen 136 
Spivev. Carol Beth 360 
Spivey. Jr.. Donald Robert 

Spoehr. Thomas William 
Spong. Martha Kingman 
SPORTS 236 
Spraguo. Karl Willia 217 
Spring. Lynda Kay 196 
Springate, Grace .338 
Springer, Marianne Gail 197, 

338.109 
Springs. Ethelyn L. 
Sprinkle, Stephen Daniel 
Spruill. Charles Winthrop 
Spurting. Frances Ann 338 
Spurtock. Martha Ann 338 
Squire. Hairv Edward 
St. John. Gill Platl 
St. Louis. Eileea M. 336 
St. Thomas, Mary Lorett^ 200, 

272 
Stabler. Winder Laud 



Stacks. WjlUam Michael 263 
Stagnard, Lyn Ellen 360 
Stahl. Tcrri Lynn 
Stallings. Gladys Lvnn 
Stallings, Gregory flalph 
Stallworth, Hugh Townsend 
Stalvey, Betsy Gill 
Stamper, Jr.. George William 
Stampfli. Ellen Stebler 3.38 
Stancill, Steven Godfrey 
Stanger. Marth Sue 
Stanley, Martha Ruth 203,339 
Stanley, Richard Peter 
Stanten, Evelyn Rosemarie 391 
Stanziano. Angela Mary 375 
Staples. Donald Paul 375 
Stapp. Barbara Ann 
Stark. Elizabeth Mary 166.339 
Starr. Deborah 375 
Starr. Judith Roxanne 204. 

339.83 
Startt. Susan Marie 197 
Stassi, Margaret Anne 376 
Stassun, Dorothy Henrietta 

399 
Staton. Gwyn Elizabeth 399 
Stalon. Leslie Marie 113, 

149,339,416 
Steams, Amy Anne 
Steckelberg, Kathryn Arm 203 
Steel, Ellen Louise 339 
Steele HI, Colin Gansert 219, 

262,263 
Steele, Janet Ellen 107,108. 

83 
SteEcek. Gary Ray 
Stegall. Pamela Lee 360 
Steblik. Linda L. 
Steimel. Stacy Elizabeth 376. 

277 
Stein. Daniel Joshua 339 
Stein. Warren Robert 375 
Steinberg. Andrew David 219, 

298,339,109 
Steindler. Amy Beth 
Steiner. Sarah Ann 
Stdl, Jeffery Alan 339 
Stephan. Anne Elizabeth 181. 

196 339 
Steph'an, Kathleen Rose 192, 

391 
Stephens, Anne Weatherly 
Stephens, Margaret Claire 

375,200 
Stephens, Suzanne Green 360 
Stephens, Thomas Scott 
Stephenson, Carolyn Gail 391 
Stephenson, Robert Bruce 
Stephenson, Susan Wilson 375 
Stephenson, Tracev Ann 360, 

379.414.109.415 ' 
Stepp. Tanva Hatcher 
Sterling. Carolyn Stacy 124. 

Stem. Charles Jay 339 
Stem. Nancy 

Stem, Ronald William 339 
Sternberg. Joel Stuart 
Stevens. Brenda Ann 
Stevens. Dorothy K. 
Stevenson, Ava Suzanne 376 
Stevenson, Claire Rhodes 
Stevenson, Deborah Jan 339 
Stevenson, Kathryn Have 360, 

415 
Stevenson, Philip H. 230 
Stewart. Jaraes Thompson 
Stewart. John Anthony 
Stewart. Marta Ruiz 
Stewart. Richard Charles 228 
Stickel. Pamela Edna 210, 

375 
Stiehl, Patricia Ann 339 
Stiff, Alice Anne 
Stiles, Margaret Ruth 192, 

Still, Connie Ann 391 
Still, William John Peter 

339,416 
Stillman, Laura Ann 
StUlwill, Jeffery Adam .376, 

283 
Stipp, Karen Lynn 197.360 
Stoel, Elizabeth Ann 
Stokes, Marion Bruce 
Stolcie, Jeanne Winston 200. 

360 
Stone, Debrfi Lee 
Stopple. Jet&ev Wavne 
Storm, Handle Henn .'(«) 
StoulTer. Jan Marie 360 
S'to^all .lohn Cathbt-rt 
:-,..;,.:,. P,..h..-s ■.;iier, 200 
■• . . .. 'Tieth 



:% ^; 



Tndex/411 




Streeper, Donna Jean 
Strella, Paul Vavrek 
Strickland, Scott Alan 391 
Strickler, Robin Lee 399 
Strobel. Charles Joseph 
Strock, Elizabeth A. 265,391 
Strohkorb, Gregg A. 
Strong, Catherine Ng 
Strong, Deborah Susan 147,3.39 
Strother, David Allen 
Struckell, Susan Jane 206.376 
Stryker, Sharon Lvnn 391 
Stuart, Michael Gerald 399 
Stuart, Richard Leonard 4,282, 

283 
Stuart, Valerie Jo 248 
Stubbs m, Frank Hunter 
Studds, Julian Anthony 
STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

136-139 
Stukenbroeker, George Henrv 

108.144,147,109,1.56 
Stulce. Valarie Leigh 391 
Stumm, Sharon Marie 206, 



340 

Sullivan, Kathleen Ann 26 
Sullivan, Keith Joseph 362, 

266,267 
Sullivan, Jr., Leonard Lee 
Summers, Scott Andrew 215 
Sumner, Terence Timothy 
Sumption, Daniel James 
Sumser, Michael Clark 
Sundquist, Paul Dean 340 
Supinski. Kathleen Anne 
Surprenant, Sally Linda 391, 

268 
Sushereba. Wendy White 340 
Suaser, Peter Alan 399 
Susaman, Audrey Helane 
Suter, Dorothy Mae 197 
Sutherland, Louis Hinton 
Suttle, Gary Amorv 
Suttle, Patrick Hampton 
Swaim, Charles B. 124,226,376 
Swain, Robert 
Swain, Tracey 392 
Swan, Stephen Kelley 
Swann, Robert Bruce 
Swanson, Patricia Ann 163, 

204,376 
Swantz, Linda Sue 11,206.376 
Swatling, Barbara 399 
Sweeney, James Thomas 
Sweeney, Laura Eileen 
Sweeting, Susan Louise 
Sweig, Donald Mitchell 
Swertfager, William Merrill 

239,262,263 
Swezey, William Berkeley 263 
Swdckley, Lisa 208 
Swift, William Joseph 
Swiner m, Connie 212,213,376 
Swink, Denise Marcel 392 
Swithers, Frank George 230 
Switzer, Rose Arlene 
Swope, Bradley Hunter 
Sykes, Amanda Ann 
Sykes, Graham James 362,248 
Sykes, Lundy M. 
Symanowski. James Thomas 290, 

230 



T 



Taaffe. Patricia Mary 
Tabakin. Sally Ann 
Tabarini, Christina Louise 
Tafro. Aleitander Joseph 239, 

241,108 
Taillcfer, Betty Jo M. 
Tait, Julia Dawson 392 
Takagi, James Thomas 
Talbot, Andrea Jean 
Talbott IV, Frank 



Talbott, Frank Christopher 

Talerico, Patricia Mary 250,281 
Talley, Barry Leenard 
Tallev. Patricia Ann 
Tallo'n. Leslie Best 
Tammi, Nancv Diane 210,362 
Tamura, Robert Fumio 376 
Tang, Stephen Shun-Chien 392 
Tankard HI, George Granville 

232 
Tankersiey, Michael Edward 

128 
Tanner, Retta Thorpe 
Tappan, Charlene Ann 392 
Tarkenton, Jeffrey L. 395 
Tate, Karen Hope 
Tatnall, Jennifer Lea 210,264 
Taylor, Alan Cozart 
Taylor, Amy Lou 203,362 
Taylor, Arthur Jay 278 
Taylor, Betsy Ellen 362 
Taylor. Carl Wavne 399 
Tavlor, John Wesley 160 
Taylor, Lydia Calvert 
Tavlor, Michael Andrew 
Taylor, Page Derieux 192, 

340 



Su, Pin 


Taylor, Paul D, 


Suddith, Kimberly Ann 


Taylor. Rick Len 


Suhler, Ann Cornelia 


Taylor, Ronald Wayne 


Suhr, Cynthia Anne 192 


Taylor, Sandra Lee 132,.376 


Sulhoff, James David 340,285 


Teabo, Mary Kathryn 340 


Sullivan, Dennis Joseph ^ 


Teeter, George Geoffrey 340, 



Teeter, Hollv Christine 197, 

376 
Teitelbaum, Alex Mark 
Tenhoor, Stuart John 
Tenney, Craig Arthur 376 
Tent, Karen Elizabeth 
Terman, Gregory William 
Terranova, Elizabeth Caroline 

362 
Terrell, Nancy Elizabeth 
Terrell, PhvUis Adele 116, 

198.361 
Terry, Veronica Monique 208, 

.361 
Thackara, Lucy R. 195 
Thaiton, Robert Jeffreys 361 
Theberge, Louise Dibrell 
Theobald, Mary Miley 
THETA DELTl CHI 

234-235 
Thode, Steven Robert 109, 

108,107,341,416 
Thomas, Brian F, 
Thomas, Carri Lynn 376 
Thomas, Earl Randolph 
Thomas, Gregory Steven 25, 

376 
Thomas, Nancy Jean 392 
Thomas, Norman Allan 
Thomas, Jr.. Robert Melvin 
Thomas, Sandra Gayle 208, 

341 
Thomas, Suzaime Cromiller 
Thomas, Twyla Blostine 
Thomas, Victoria Paula 
Thomas, Jr., William Allison 

Thomas, William Miles 376 
Thompson, Bryan Todd 
Thompson, Clyde Gerard 
Thompson, Jr., George Arnold 

230 
Thompson, Jeffrey Lynn 215 
Thompson, Kathryn Angela 260 
Thompson, Kenneth Charles 
Thompson, Lisa Beth 
Thompson, Lisa CaitUn 275 
Thompson, Mary Catherine 
Thompson, Mary Elizabeth 
Thompson, Michael David 
Thompson, Rhonda Energene 

392 
Thompson, Robert Bowers 
Thomsen, Jeffrey Town 341 
Thomson, Marcy Ann 361 
Thomhill, Matthew Thomas 
Thornton HI, Daniel M. 
Thorp, Kathleen Jane 195,376 
Thurman, Andrew Edward 399, 

109 
Tibbatts. Tern Ann 
Tiemey, Kevin Michael 376 
Tikkala, David Holden 230 
Tillery, Mary Jo 392 
Tillman, Sr.. Walter J. 
Timberlake, Linda Leigh 

341,108 
Timmons.-Williaro Frederick 

225,286 
Tims, Mary Giatrakis 
Tipton. Carol Lee 341 
Tisdale, Margaret A. 
Tison, Edwin 361 



Tison, Sidney Smith 376 
Tito, Hugh Francis 341 
Tjossem, Linda Ann 361 
Todd, Carol Ruth 200,341 
Todd, John Wesley 
Todd, Robert Michael 362 
Todhunter, Stuart Jameson 
Tokarz, Peter Mason 270 
ToUey, Elizabeth Ellen 
Tolson, Karen Joanne 48, 

160,362 
Tomchek, Debra Moen 
Tomlinson, Keith WiHiam 

219,376.273 
Tondrowski, .Joan Barbara 
Toney, Rebecca Faye 
Toomajian, Jane Reilty 



Towne, Robert Lyne 
Townsend, Gregoiy Clark 
Townsend, Janet Lynn 235,362 
Townsend, Laura Lee 
Townsend, Ramon D. 
Townsend, Susan Holt 208,376 
Traband, Sarah Louise 
Trabert, Mary C, 
Trabucco. Linda Ruth 
Trahan. Augustus P. 
Trainer, Michele Mary 197 
Trainer, Philip 
Tran, Kim-Dinh Thi 
Trapasso. Beatrice 114 
Travelstead, Jack G. 
Travis, Sara Hines 
Trawicki, Susan Mar^' 202,203 
Traylor, Kathy Lvnn 
Trbovich, Nancy "Lynn 206, 

207,341 
Treanor. Craig Paul 
Trefzger, Elizabeth Carol 392 
Treleaven, Thomas Michael 
Trenkmann, Kurt Augustus 
Trepanier, Lauren Ann 376, 

415,109 
Trester, HoUiday Steele 200 

248,341 
Tievey, Lisa Haynes 392 
Trible, Anne Brooke 107, 

136,206,341,108,109 
Trice, Ruth Angela 260.376 
Trimble, John Miller 392 
Tripician, Elizabeth Markley 
Tripician, Peter Harrison 
Tripp, Bemice Elizabeth 198, 

199,341 
Tiogdon, Denise Ann 362,3 
Troia, Susan Mariann 399 
Trompeter, Deborah Rebecca 
Trotman, Christy Caroline 341 
Trowbridge m, Robert Hub- 

Trozinski, Steven John 219 
Trueax, John Ward 
Trumbo, Stephen Taylor 
Tmmbill, Gay 362 
Truskett, Olenna 392 
Tsantes, George Konstantine 
Tschirgi, Trent Alan 341 
Tuason, Victoria Valerie 
Tucker, Alan Scott 
Tucker, Carter Harrison 
Tudder, Davison Lewis 
Tufts, Elizabeth Ann 203, 

362 
Tuggle, Nora Ann 341 
Tulloh, Barbara Lee 197, 

376,272 
Tumbleson, Karen Christina 

376 
Turbeville, Jr., Charles 

Thomas 263 
Turbiville, Joseph Wilson 

341 
Turbyfill, Beth EUen 

206,207,362 
Turgeon, Lortaine Marie 341 
Turk, Heather Fontaine 195 
Turman. Ann EUzabeth 341 
Tumage, Robert Blair 
Turner, Cynthia May 206,362 
Turner, David Raiford 127 
Turner, Gary Dale 
Turner. James Edward 
Turner, Kathryn Deidra 376 
Turner, Kimberley Dawn 
Turner, Patricia Dezem 
Turner. Robert Thomas 362 
Turner, William Futral 
Turrentine, Shannon Rye 197 
TuthUl, David Wilson 341 
Tuthill, Diane Lorraine 341 
Tygrest, James Richard 
Tyler, Connie Denise 362 
Tyman, Cynthia Gayle 
Tyndall, Larry William 341 
Tyner, Paul Mark 228,229,239 



Tyree, Robin Nell 



u 



Ueberhorst, Susan Gail 392 
Uehara, Yoahifumi 
Uhl. Katherine Ruth 
Umstott, Nancy Susan 376 
Ung. Nancy 261,392 
UNITED SKIERS OF 

VIRGiNIA 123 
Unkulvasapaul, Manida 
Unruh, Marry Frances 376 
Upchurch. Wilhetmina Hubbard 
Upperco, Ann Katherine 392 
Urbanski, Jr., Steven Michael 
Urek, Alan Southroayo 341 
Uribe, Sarita Maria 362 
Urquhart, John I. A. 
Uthappa. Machia Mapangada 341 
Utt. Sherry Lynn 392 



\[ 



Vachal, Richard 
Vaden, Anne Keller 
Vaden, Anne Spotswood 
Vail. Jr.. Robert E. 
Valenti, Monique 392,281 
Valentine, Cathleen Maria 
Valentine, Cynthia Birdaall 

341 
Vallow. Karen F. 
Van Namen. John 376,278 
Vance. John Eric 263 
Vance, Marian Leslie 
Vance, Tamara Ann 181 
Vandecastle, Karen Anne 197, 

376 
Vandeventer, WiUiam Robert 261 
Vandezande, Jeanette Seering 
Vangeaael, Lisa Claire 
Vankirk, Katherine Ann 362 
Vanraontfrans, Margaret Norman 
Vannewkirk. Carolyn Jane 
Vantine, Robin Francifi 
Vanveld, Peter A. 
Varker. Susan Gibson 203,392 
Varrone. Jerrie Sue 204,205, 

341 
Vasapoli, Dennis Lee 
Vaaeleck. Jr.. James Mlchae! 392 
Vaughn, Catherine Taylor 250, 

376 
Vaughn. Joseph Lee 230,267 
Vaughn, Merlin Cleveland 362 
Vaughn, Patricia Page 203.392 
Vaughn. Thomas Carroll 215 
Vaughn, Vickie Lynn 
Vaughn Jr., William Joaephus 

399 
Vaughn, Jr., Robert Lee 
Vaught, Jr., Lawrence C. 
VayvadJa, Marsha Louise 392 
Vazquez, John Julian 
Vecchione, Michael 
Vebko. Jane Fahey 
Vehrs, Nancy Joyce 362 
Velde, Blake Thomas 135,362 
Vera, Kristi Marie 392 
Verlander, Jr„ Richard Henry 342 

342 
Verlander. Rosemary Frances 

362 
Vermeulen, Mary Elaine 

Wiersema 
Vernon, Christwher 
Vesley, Kathy Ellen 
Vick, Cynthia Marie 392 
Viehweg. Keri Sue 126.342 
Vienna, Kevin Richard 
Villalba. Wendy 362 
Vincent, Margaret Louise 
Vitalia, David Keefe 342 
Vlannes. Katherine 342 
Voegelin, Stephen Peter 342 
Vogel, Gregory M. 



Vogel, Stephen Fredenc 232 
Volk, Robert Michael 
Vollero, Keith Raphael 
Volhrath, Karl Vincent 
Voflrath. Margaret Ann 376 
Vollrath. Robert Edward 
Volpone, Michael John 
Vongerhren. Erich Karl 
Von Haug, Peter 395 
Vonlersner. Christine Karin 
Vondettingen, Susanna 

Lisalotte 342 
Vonofenheim, William H. C. 
Voudrias, Evangelos Alexandres 
Vulpe, Shirley-Ann E. 

w. 



Waddle, Harry Patton 
Wadsworth, Brett Garrett 267 
Wagar, Martha Elizabeth Grafacfi 
Wagner. Caryn Anne 107,342 
Wagner, EUzabeth L. 
Wagner. Karen D. 102 
Wagner, Katherine EUzabeth 
Wagner, Kelly Nan 260,392,27| 
Wagner, Michael Joseph 217,,;^ 

239,342 
Wagner, Patricia Anne 
Wagner, Rita Schreyer 
Wagner, .Jr., Robert Edwin 242. 

376 
Wagner, Stuart Turner 
Wagner, Timothy P. 269 
Wagstaff, Susan Gayle 268 
Wahl, Ellen 

Walk. Beth Ann 192,376 
Walker, Barbara McCoy 
Walker. Catherine Marie 393 
Walker, Edward Richard 362 
Walker, Edwin L. 
Walker, Elaine Virginia 362 
Walker DI, Ephfrom Randolph 

393 
Walker, Jon Zane 
Walker HI, Lewis Wesley 
Walker, Rebecca Lynne 126.192 
Walker, Richard John 149,342. 

415,143 
Walker, Robert C. 
Walker. Robert Joseph 
Walkley, Kenneth Boland 
Wall, Majorie Lancaster 203, 

362 
Wallace, Beverly Anita 342, 



230 

Wallace. James Weldon 
Wallace, Roberta H. 
WaUach, Fred Barry 228,239 
WalUn, David O. 
WaUing, Alyce L. 
WalUs. Donna Jeanne 362 
Wallmever, Elisabeth EUen 210 
Walls, Mary M. 
Walode, Scott Allen 190,226 
Walters, Edward Burrell 222, 

362,273 
Walton, Claire EUen 204,362 
Walton, David Andrew 239 
Walton, EUzabeth Ann 
Walton, .Ml Kristin 204,393 
Walton, Susan Andrea 342 
Waltrich, Steven John 376 
Waltrip, Jean Bahr 
Wampler, Anthony ColUer 
Wampler, Dorothy Lou 376 
Wamaley, James Cooper 219 
Wancio, Lisa Gaye 
Wang, Tzuu-Shin 
Ward. Ann Cutchin 342 
Ward, Carolyne Grey 
Ward, Elizabeth Carol 
Ward, James Francis 232 
Ward, Juhe Lynne 393 
Ward, Kimberly Rene 342 
Ward, Lauren Diatui 
Ward, Laurence Richard 
Ward, Mary Kathryn 
Ward, Mitchell Keith 
Ward, Paula Angela 363 
Ward, Robert Vincent 
Wardrop. Daniel Hubert 
Ware, Rex Davis 215,342 
Warfle, Patrick Daniel 236,283 
Warlick, Mark Bridger 
Warner, Carol Arm Goble 



412/Index 



Warner, Granville Clayton 235 
Wamer. Pamela Sue 43 
Warr. Linda Susan 261 
Warren, Jeanne Terese 363 
Warren, Susan Bradford 20S, 

343 
Warren, Taylor Kendall 
Warrick, Cecily Barksdale 206, 

289,363,277 
Warring, Bruce David 
Warthan, Debra Gail 
Warwick, Sandy Burdctte 232, 

363 
Washer, Cheryl Edna 261,343, 

108 
Washington, Gilda Francine 
Washko, George Jeffrey 343 
Washko, Susan 
Wassom, Sally Comett 
Waterman, Jr., Avery TiUinghaa 

107,140,343.108,109 
Waters, Ann Elizabeth 
Waters, Charles Andrew 232 
Watkins, Ann Clarke 195,343 
Watkins, Susan Gary 
Watson, Deborah Ellen 376 
Watson, Ellen Halward 393 
Watson, Jr., James William 
Watson, John Mark 363 
Watson, Kay Phillips 
Watson, Lisa Kay 343 
Watson, Mark Steven 
Wattaykom. Gullaya 
Waiters, Jeffrey W'infred 
Watts, George William 
Watts, John E. 

Wauford, Jennifer Ann 197.108 
Way, Karen G. 
Wayland, Scott Prosser 343, 

108 
Waymack, Janice Ruth 
WCWM 150-151 
Weathersbee. Lisa Marie 5,118, 

192 343 
Weaver, Cynthia GaU 204 
Weaver, Hugh Mac 
Weaver, Scott Cameron 343, 

107,108 
Webb, Michael Reid 
Weber. Cynthia .Joan 343,192 
Weber. Donna L. 204,376 
Wedding, Daryl Leigh 197.363 
Weddle, David Gregory 
Weeks, Margaret Ann 203,376 
Weening. Richard Henry 
Weihs, WiUiam Francis 376. 

266.267 
Weiland, Elizabeth Marie 
Weiler, Christine Anne 192, 

393 
Weinberg. Charles Martin 
Weinbeiig, Neil Aaron 220 
Weinstein. Barry Evan 343 
Weinsteio. Judith Ellen 
Weintraub. Daniel Louis 225 
Weirick. Gunvor Elizabeth 



Weiss, Carol Anne 
Weithoner, Katherine Sue 343 
Weitz, Eric Bradley 230 
Welch, Catherine Lynn 206, 

242,363 
Wellford, Ann Drurv 343 
Wellons, Catherine Ann 343 
Wells, David Wclby 
Wells. Richard Curtis 219. 

239,241 
Wells, Russell Norwood 
Wells. Suzanne Louise 376 
Welsh. Catherine Frances 192. 

363 
Welsh. Elizabeth Burch 
Wendell. Christopher John 
Wendt. Diane Louise 377 
Wenger, Helen H. 
Wengler, Michael E. 
Wente. Mary Angela 
Wentzel. Nancy Ann Hilton 
Wenzel. Christine A. 284 
Wesley. Nathaniel Gatewood 

WESLEY FOUNDATION 

51 
Weasel, Janet 
West, Anita Gay 377 
West, Beverly Louise 
West, Carroll Van 
West, Jr., Dale Henry 
West, Jr., James Odell 
West, Jocelyn Carol 399 
West, Keimeth Michael 
West, Margaret Bame 
West, Shearer Carroll 
West, Stephanie Anne 
Westbrooke, Pamela Glenn 210. 



Weston, Donald Paul 
Wetmore, Carol Lee 393 
Wetta. Jr., Daniel Joseph 
Wetterer, Katherine Cnst 

195,343 
Whanger, Donna Foushee 
Wheatley III, Thomas Blackburn 

393 
Wheaton. Michael Grier 
Wheeler, Gregory Allen 343 
Wheeler, Julia Lee 206,343 
Wheeler, Laurie Marie 
Wheeler, Sarah Elizabeth 
Whitcomb. Melanie 
White. Jr.. Alfred Lewis 
White. Audrey Ellen 363,191, 

208 
White, Bessida Cauthome 
White, Carol Cottingham 
White, Clay Kevin 
White, Diane Sheppard 393 
White. Jr.. Ernest Alvin 393 
White, Jr.. Harold 0. 226 
White. Howard Jonathan 
White. Karen Kay 192.393 
White, Lolleen Barber 
White. Stacey Jean 377 
White. Tare Elaine 377 
Whitehurat. Colon Hall 399 
Whiteaell. Eric Dwight 
Whitfield, Maty Diane 363 
Whitley, Karen 377 
Whitley, Scott Michael 257, 

258,259 
Whitmarsh. Lynne Louise 208. 

363 
Whitmire. Aruie Corley 344 
Wh'ltmire, Jerry Cleveland 377 
Whitney. Jacquelyn Ellenann 

363 
Whitney. Mark Bryan 
Whitson. Christina Vance 363 
Whittaker. Curtis Mack 267 
Whittico. Gloria Ann 344,109 
Whittv. John T. 
Whitworth. Kathryn Mary 393, 

264 



268 
Wiener, Eric Stanley 
Wiesemen, Katherine Claire 344 
Wiggert, Sarah Christine 393 
Wiggins, Donald Kent 232,363 
Wiggins, Joanne Louise 393 
Wilber, Anne Catherine 
Wilbur, Letitia F. EUen 
Wilbum, Thomas Joseph 
Wilcox, Dianne Elizabeth 

Hulbert 
Wilcox, Marie Elizabeth 
Wild, Karen 363 
Wilde. Jr.. Carlton Dalbey 
Wilding. Mary Lyim Bland 
Wiley. Jenny Leigh 
Wilfore. Patricia Gale 
Wilkin. Sue Anne 200 
Wildins. Elizabeth Wakefield 
Wildins. Patricia Louise 
Wilkinson, Cathryn Stallings 
Wilkinson. Cynthia Gayle 
Wilkinson. Mary Nell 284 
Will, Alyson Hunter 363 
WUlett, Steven Bradley 344, 

109 



BAND 178-179 
WILLIAM AND MARY 

CHOIR 176-177 
WILLIAM AND MARY 

CHORUS 176 
WILLMM AND MARY 

CHRISTIAN FELLOW- 
SHIP 52 
WILLIAM AND MARY 

REVIEW 152-163 
WILLIAM AND MARY 

THEATRE 160-165 
Williams, Artis Earl 107.345. 

109 
Williams. Barbara G. 
Williams. Brenda T. 
Williams. Cherry Dawn 107 
WilKams. David Oscar 232.363 
Williams. Deborah Y. 
Williams. Debra Oenise 192, 

377 
Williams. Duane 
Williams. Dudley Leigh 377 
Williams. Elaine Martha 



Williams, Elizabeth 208.393 
Williams. Francine Bobbinette 
Williams, Harvey Shepherd 
Williams. James Lee 
Williams. Jerone Otis 
Williams. Julie Elizabeth 34.5. 



Williams. Kevin Turner 
Williams. Martha Shields 
WUIiams. Nancy Wallace 393 



Williams. Susan Frances 377. 

414.415 
Williams. Tyler Edward 
Williams. Valerie Jean 
Williams. Walter Lawrence 
WILLIAMSBURG AREA 

TUTOIUAL SERVICE 

SERVICE 121 
Williamson, Karen Jayne 345 
Williamson, Keith Eugene 
Williamson, Robert Stickley 
Williford, Rhonda G. 399 
Willie. Cynthia Ann 377 
Willis, Kimberlcy Dawn 199 



Willson. Margaret Anne 209 
Wilsey, William Lee 
Wilson. Beverley Kay 203.346 
Wilson. Brie Jade Lindsay 151 
Wilson. Catherine Fern 377 
Wilson, Charles Haile 131 
Wilson, Christopher .loseph 
Wilson, Connie Long 203 
Wilson, Dean Ensor 27,28,345 
Wilson, James Russell 
Wilson, Jeanne Marie 204 
Wilson, Julie A. 
Wilson. Mary Ann 
Wilson, Ralph Welton 125,345 
Wilson, Robert Bullington 
Wilson, Timothy Wavne 
Wilson, William Estes 
Windt, Gerard Richard 
Wine. Cynthia Regina 363 
Winegar. Kristine 206.393 
Wingerd. Edmund C. 
Wingfield. Charies Parker 
Wingo. Warren Douglas 45,367. 

377 
Winkleman, Marcia R. 
Winn, Ashley Robinson 
Winn. Kenneth Robert 222.363 
Winter. Catherine Ellen 197. 

Winter. Thomas Carlyle 278 
Wirshup, Philip Michael 363 
Wise. Annie Cheshire 
Wise. Frances Elisabeth 
Wisniewski. Regina Maria 393 
Witcover, Paul 
Withka. Joan Marie 
Witmer, Rachel Steele 363 
Witt. David Samuel 363 
Witten, Margaret Mahone 192. 

193.363 
Wittkamp. Bernard Francis 216. 

217.362.377 
Wittmann. Christopher E. 249 
Wo. Andrew Man-Chung 
Woeasner. Stephan Dupont 215 
Wolf. Lisa 203 
Wolf. Titus Lynn 
Wolfe. Charles Corbit 
Wolfe. Sally Frances 192.377 
Wolff. Richard Ernest 
Wolford. Catherine 107.192. 

345.108 
Wolle, William Nicholas 232 
Wolthuis. Donald Ray 
Womack, Cathy J. 
Wong, Edward David 278 
Wong, Lisa Anne 
Wong, Susanna Lee 195,345 
Wood, Douglas Porterfield 226 
Wood, Henry Raymond 235,278 
Wood, Jeffrey Barlow 377 
Wood, Pia Christina 346 
Wood, Sarah Ellen 377 
Wood, Sharon Diane 
Wood, William Donald 
Wooldridge, Peter William 345 
Wooldridge, Robert Williams 96, 

Woolfolk. Ethel Watts 
Woolley. Jill Caroline 393 
WORK 54-56 
Worland. Jane Louise 
Worthy. Martha Chandler 
Wortmsn. Laura Kimberly 206. 



Wrabley, Deirdre Marie 377 
Wragg. Ethel Irene 
Wrav. Gregory Allan 393 
Wray, NatTianiel Edwin 220 
Wright, Amy 260.393,272 
Wright, Elizabeth Blackwell 

377,206 
Wright, .leff Cornell 190,220, 

345 
Wright, Louis Jeffery 239 
Wright, Mary Ann 345 
Wright, Ronald Frederic ,377,270 
Wright, Susan Katherine 196, 

250,345,272 
Wright. Susan Lorraine 
Wu, Sha Fong 

Wimderlich, Kenneth William 39; 
Wyant, Jean Burton 
Wyatt, Karen Elizabeth 131 
Wyrough, Alexander Penn Hill 



Zirulnik. Barry Stuart 393 
Zoebelein, David Andrew 

235,346 
Zoller, Matthew Ernst LSI 109 
Zorich, Pamela Teresa 
Zuckerinan, Anita L. 
Zutli, Jerilyn 
Zupan, Michael Ue 190,219, 

239,363 
Zvosec, Christine Lynn 113, 

149.203,363.376,415,109 
Zybko, Susan Marie 



230 



Y 



Yamaguchi. Hideko 345,272 
Yamaflhita. Tatauo Henrv 131 
Yamaahita. Yukiko 209.377 
Yamoah-Kyei, Kwame 
Yaney, Carolyn Jean 
Yang, Don-Lin 
Yang. Peter 
Yankovich. Kathv Lynn 197. 

345 
Yamoff. Michael Leroy 225 
Yatefi, Elizabeth Nevenka 
Yate, Kathleen Elizabeth 345 
Yeager, Gail Bennett 197.377 
Yeager, Gait Ellen 
Yeager, Joanne 393 
Yerly, Raymond Alan 393 
Yoder, Sandra Dell 
Yoritomo, Leonard Lee 
York, Roxanne Willette 
Young. Bruce Michael 
Young, Janet Elizabeth 
Young. John Frederick 
Young, John Mark 377 
Young in, Lawrence Edward 393 
Young, Madaline Vaden 
Young, Michael Gordon 
Young. Patricia Diane 208.393 
Young, Rebecca Blair 
Young, Robert Kevin 217 
Young, Stewart 
Youngdahl, Jenny Irene 206 
Younger. Deborah Lynn 289, 

281 
Younger. Renee Suzanne 363 
Yowan, David Linn 232 
Yoweli. Emily Elizabeth 

107.200.345 
Yu. Aaron Peir-Shin 
Yurchak. Carole Ann 



Zaborowski. Annanaarie 393. 



345 
Zanca, Criepin 

Zandaraki, Richard Leonard 263 
Zanetti. Lisa Ann 393 
Zangardi. Carl Vincent 
Zappulla, Morv Ann 363 
Zamlli, Claire Marie 2-30 
Zaruba. Daniel Scott 283 
Zearfoee. Jonathan Andrew 
Zegel. Kevin Scott 
Zeleniak, Nancy Ellen 



Zellmer, Linda R. 
Zeris. Jamea Nickolaob 
Zettler. John Fehst- -19,: 




Catherine Goewey 



Index/413 



RIGHT: A new addition to the photography 
staff, Barry Long, lends his talent. 
FAR RIGHT: Hours of typing and proof- 
reading occupy Tracey Stephenson and 
Vicky Dervishian before a deadline. 
BELOW: Perfori 

Samuels, choose, ^ _ 

impact for her section. 
FAR BELOW: Careful cropping absorbs 
Religion Editor, Susan Williams and Or- 
ganizations Editor, Ca 
BELOW RIGHT: A ci„..„. ^^.. „. .... 
yearbook, the Index, is compiled by Bill 
Silkworth. 



414/Staff Box 



nahing It IPossib 




Editor 

Business Manager 

Layout/Design Editor . . 

Copy Editor 

Lifestyles Editor 

Performing Arts Editor 

Sports Editors 

Greeks Editors 

Academics Editor 

Classes Editors 

Index Editor 

Administration Editor . 
Organizations Editor . . 

Religion Editor 

Graduates Editor 

Honoraries Editor 

Media Editor' 

Government Editor . . . . 
Typing Coordinator 



Rich Walker 
Bob Keroack 
Ed Smith 



Leslie Staton 

Andy Morse 

Kathy Gorges 

Rosemary Harold 

Chris Zvosec 

Cindy Samuels 

Laurie Trepanier/Keith Harrison 

Paul Fletcher/Lori Nordseth 

Molly Macauley 

Jamie Baylis/Kathi Sitterson 

Bill Silkworth 

Anne Jacocks 

Caroline Bolte 

Susan Williams 

Lydia Dambekalns 

Vicky Dervishian 

Steve Thode 

~ Dave Garland 

Tracey Stephenson 



Photographers 



Doug Kirkpatrick 

Barry Long 

Jim Lowden 



. pecial acknowledgements 
to Rich Walker and Bob 
Keroack for color photography. 

For their hours in the office: 
Lifestyles: Sidney Brown, Tom 
Shannon, Mary Sowell, Kit Steven- 
son; Performing Arts: Ish Arango, 
Rosemary Harold, Jerry Plunkett; 
Sports: Doug McCusker, Ann Smith, 
Buddy Phillips, Dave Raney, Don 



Morris, Herbie Hogge, Mark Scura, 
Terri Matthews, Ron Pollack, 
Jim Cochran; Greeks: Linda John- 
son, Dori Phillips; Academics: 
Betsy Fournier; Classes: Amy Lit- 
tle, Kathy Lubin, Pam Lunny; 
Index: Brooks Savage, Peter Still, 
Pernie Hatcher; and for hours of 
typing, Tracey Stephenson, Pam 
Lunny. 



r olume 81 of the Colonial Echo was 
r-.nted by Inter-Collegiate Press 
of Shawnee Mission, Kansas. Four thou- 
sand two hundred copies were printed, 
each consisting of 416 pages, dimensions 
9x12 inches. The cover was hot stamp in 
gold on a classical blue base material. 

Copy: All body copy 10 pt. Century 
Schoolbook. All captions 8 pt.; Greek 
rosters and index, 6 pt. 

Headline Styles: Cover, title page: 
Olive Antique; Introduction, Dividers, 
Subdividers, Conclusion: Uptight Neon; 
Contents: Helvetica Medium; Lifestyles: 
Friz Quadrata; Religion: Ancient Egyptian; 



Academics: Pitilli Roman Black; Adminis- 
tration: Peignot Bold; Graduates: Windsor 
Honoraries: University Roman; Organiza- 
tions: Futura Inline; Government: Olive 
Antique; Media: Microgramma Bold; Per- 
forming Arts: Broadway Engraved; Greeks: 
Tiffany Heavy, University Roman, Etrus- 
can; Sports: Souvenir Medium Italic; 
Classes: Perpetua Bold; Index: Tiffany 
Heavy. All headlines were handset by 
the Colonial Echo Staff. Total edi- 
torial and production budget, $40,.562. 

Further questions can be addressed to 
the Editor, Colonial Echo, College of Wil- 
liam and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 2.T186. 



:^3I5/Staff. 



ad To fi ncuj 




n important decision was 
I facing the College of Wil- 
liam and Mary in the coming 
decade. Until recently, the 
small and the personal rather 
than the large and impersonal 
had dominated the campus in ap- 
pearance and attitude. But 
present circumstances — lack of 
funds, changing opinions, and 
changing needs — were beginning 
to exert pressure on and threat- 
en this dominance. Already the 
computer was beginning to take 
over previously "human" tasks 
and the student/teacher ratio 
was slowly increasing. Would 
modernization and all it implied 
spread to the rest of the cam- 
pus? Would the small become 
the large? 

Only the students, the facul- 
ty, and the administration 
could answer these questions. 
Direction and emphasis would 
have to be decided by them- 
selves for themselves. For 
them, a possible "turning point" 
was approaching in the next 
decade; one they could not ig- 



.Office of Student Ffnanclal Aid